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I have a task to write .net wrapper around native activex component, which loads realtime data on stock prices.

The question is how to test it correctly?

It seems reasonable to me to make the following test cases:

  1. Test it works in general: Start loading prices on some ticker, make sure loading starts
  2. Test data is flowing: Start loading prices on some ticker, make sure I have recieved some amount of updates
  3. Test that I have reasonable prices: Start loading prices on some ticker, make sure I have recieved expected price (or al least price in some reasonable range)

Unfortunately:

  1. I cannot be sure that some stock ticker will exist forever.
  2. I cannot be sure that some stock price will update for specified number of times per period
  3. or will have some exact value (or even value in given range with 100% probability)

Of course, I can mock the data source, and it would make some sense. But in this case I will test my wrapper to be fool-proof against myself, not agains those guys who wrote the native loader

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Non-determinism and unit testing don't go together that well. However, I would argue that the only non-determinism you're facing is the data and its format you receive from native loader. Why?

Test it works in general: Start loading prices on some ticker, make sure loading starts

This should be controlled by .NET code entirely; either by some sort of job or manual method invocation. No non-determinism.

Test data is flowing: Start loading prices on some ticker, make sure I have received some amount of updates

Again, .NET code. You either need yet another job that would periodically query native loader for data, or something that observes events from native loader and responds to them.

Test that I have reasonable prices: Start loading prices on some ticker, make sure I have received expected price (or at least price in some reasonable range)

What is a reasonable price? A range from 0 to Int32.Max? Don't try to test native loader. Make assumptions about how it works and build your code around those assumptions. You can of course verify data formats, ranges (like, prices shouldn't be negative values) but that's about it. This brings us to the actual code you might want to unit test - class that maps their data to your data (domain objects - a simple POCO - StockQuotation or TickerData). Builder/mapper/converter of some sorts.

Now, you want to have two sets of tests - one for builder/mapper code to ensure your later code works around assumptions you made. The second set would be traditional system/integration test - entire process from loading data to building results with actual components (you shouldn't care about tickers ceasing to exists here as that's again something beyond your control).

In such setup, if something stops working it usually may mean one of two things:

  1. Assumptions you made about loader's data changed (or you overlooked something)
  2. Your builder/mapper/converter is implemented incorrectly around valid assumptions

At this point tracking issue should be easy. Don't try to write fool-proof code because you won't. Code having bugs is normal state of things. You find them and fix them. It's much easier to prepare for errors/exceptions than try to write code not containing them in first place. Not to mention, you cannot really control bugs in 3rd party code (your native loader) - it's better to prepare for them coming.

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+1 Thanks for detailed response! Your points 1 and 2 are great, I guess it must be a correct way of handling my situation. Could you please clarify something: in your opinion, I should use any ticker and if it ceases to exists and my tests start failing, just chainge it with new one and do not worry? –  Rustam Nov 13 '13 at 14:01
    
@Rustam: Yes, I'd go with any ticker (heck, even selected at random to make sure you don't accidentally make too many assumptions about your data). Note that ticker selection is only relevant for integration/component (large) test. Builder/mapper should be indifferent to whether ticker reflects actual stock or not. –  jimmy_keen Nov 13 '13 at 14:18

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