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I have a simple data file that I want to load, in a C++ program. For weird reasons, it doesn't work:

  • I tried it on Windows assuming the file was in the same directory: failed.
  • I tried it on Windows by moving the file in C:\ directory: worked.
  • I tried it on Linux putting the file in the same directory: failed.

The snippet:

void World::loadMap(string inFileName) {
  ifstream file(inFileName.c_str(), ios::in);
  if (file) {
  }
  else 
  {
    cout<<"Error when loading the file \n";
    exit(-1);
  }
}

I call the loadMap method like this:

World::Instance()->loadMap("Map.dat");

(World is a singleton class).

How can I find the exact error, by using try-catch or anything else?

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I guess, to be portable, you'll need to use full path. –  Drakosha Jan 3 '10 at 13:38
2  
Using "./filename" (the ./ is assumed and not even required) is portable across Windows and Linux, the problem could be that the CWD isn't what he thinks it is, though. –  Roger Pate Jan 3 '10 at 13:49
    
can you try to write a simple file operation program and see if things work. just #include <fstream> using namespace std; int main () { ifstream fin ("map.dat"); if (fin.EOF()) return 1; else { fin.close(); return 0;}} –  segfault Jan 3 '10 at 13:51
    
Bo Tian: it's eof (lowercase) and you should only use it to test a previous stream operation: it does not tell you if the next input would fail due to EOF. –  Roger Pate Jan 3 '10 at 13:52
    
Thanks Roger !! It solved my problem ! And thanks++ for the edit ! Can you please move your answer to "Answer", so I can set is as best answer ? –  Amokrane Chentir Jan 3 '10 at 13:53
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is the working directory.

When you specify a relative path for a file it uses the working directory (which may not be the same as the directory where you application is stored on the file system).

  • Thus you either need to use an absolute path.
  • Or you need to find the current working directory and specify the file relative to that.
  • Or change the current working directory.
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By default, a file failing to open (or any other I/O operation) does not raise an exception. You can change this behaviour, but the standard still provides no means of extracting from an exception the exact reason for failure.

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Prasoon: in the future, probably a good idea to wait until the post is 5 mintues old before editing for that---let the author have a window to find those errors himself, and 5 mins corresponds to what SO recognizes as "the same edit". –  Roger Pate Jan 3 '10 at 14:05
    
@Roger I don't mind people fixing my typos - I'm a pretty crap typist. I agree in general with you, though. –  anon Jan 3 '10 at 14:08
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Linux filenames are case-sensitive.
Is your file actually named map.dat?

Also, did you try putting the file in the current directory?

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The file is Map.dat. And yes it's in the current directory ! –  Amokrane Chentir Jan 3 '10 at 13:45
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Roger Pate's comment:

Using "./filename" (the ./ is assumed and not even required) is portable across Windows and Linux, the problem could be that the CWD isn't what he thinks it is, though.

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