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I've written a custom print function. My problem is that I need to return a const char* as this has to be used in another function. I simply have no idea how to manage that...

anotherFunction (const char* text /*Here*/, unsigned __int32 value, unsigned __int64 bigVal);

I know the following example/s do/es not work as it should. That's what I've tried so far.

const char* CatchMessage (const char *message, ...)
{
    va_list  args;
    va_start (args, message);
    /*?*/
    va_end   (args);
    return message;
}

I've yet only managed to get the correct output in cmd, but I actually need it as return value.

void CatchMessage (const char *message, ...)
{
    va_list  args;
    va_start (args, message);
    vfprintf (stdout, message, args);
    va_end   (args);
}

Call:

CatchMessage ("Some Input %s and %d equals to %d", randString, randNumber, secRandNumber);

Should return:

"Some Input stuff and 12 equals to 6"

I have not been able to find a solution. Any help would be appreciated.

Q: How do I get this CatchMessage function to return the correctly formatted const char* ?

share|improve this question
2  
I suggest checking whether your system has vasprintf() or vs[n]printf() (the latter could be called twice - once with a NULL buffer to get the output length, then again on a buffer you malloc/new)... your client code will need to be responsible for deallocating the memory. But, what's the point? Have you considered boost::format and std::string? –  Tony D Nov 13 '13 at 9:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem with returning a (const) char * is that you have to have a buffer somewhere.

There are several ways to accomplish this:

  1. The caller has to provide that buffer
  2. You have to malloc() it
  3. The function itself as a static buffer, but that would make it non-reentrant - which would be bad for multithreading etc.

Ad 1:

void CatchMessage(char * result, size_t maxlen, const char *message, ...)
{
    va_list ap;
    va_start(ap, message);
    vsnprintf(result, maxlen, message, ap);
    va_end(ap);
}

called with

char buffer[500];
CatchMessage(buffer, sizeof buffer, "Some Input %s and %d equals to %d", randString, randNumber, secRandNumber);
anotherfunction(buffer, ...)

ad 2:

char * CatchMessage(const char *message, ...)
{
    size_t size = 500;
    char * result = malloc(size);
    if (!result) return NULL; // error handling!
    while (1) {
        va_list ap;
        va_start(ap, message);
        size_t used = vsnprintf(result, size, message, ap);
        va_end(ap);
        char * newptr = realloc(result, size);
        if (!newptr) { // error
            free(result);
            return NULL;
        }
        result = newptr;
        if (used <= size) break;
        size = used;
    }
    return result;
}

called with

char * buffer = CatchMessage(buffer, sizeof buffer, "Some Input %s and %d equals to %d", randString, randNumber, secRandNumber);
if (!buffer) { /* error handling: no memory! */ }
anotherfunction(buffer, ...)
free(buffer); // important for avoiding memory leaks

ad 3:

char * CatchMessage(const char *message, ...)
{

    static char result[500]; // static is important here! Otherwise the memory will be freed immediately after returning.
    va_list ap;
    va_start(ap, message);
    vsnprintf(result, sizeof result, message, ap);
    va_end(ap);
    return result;
}

called with

char * buffer = CatchMessage(buffer, sizeof buffer, "Some Input %s and %d equals to %d", randString, randNumber, secRandNumber);
anotherfunction(buffer, ...)

There is no other option, especially not defining

char result[500];

in the function and then returning it: this array lives on the stack and is freed immediately after return. It cannot be safely accessed by the caller; its contents are just undefined.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you glglgl :) –  Blacktempel Nov 13 '13 at 10:03
    
@Blacktempel You're welcome. I just added some code... –  glglgl Nov 13 '13 at 13:00

It sounds like CatchMessage should take a pointer to a char buffer (and its size), and vsnprintf() into that buffer.

share|improve this answer

Since you're using C++ (at least according to the tags on the question) why not just return the string in a std::string ?

share|improve this answer
    
it's tagged as 'C' –  Tom Tanner Nov 13 '13 at 9:47
6  
It's also tagged as C++ –  Sean Nov 13 '13 at 9:47
1  
@TomTanner: last I heard it was recommended to use RAII in C++; the real issue here is that the best answer depends very much on whether you want a C or C++ solution. Sure, you can use a C solution in C++; but why tag it C++ then ? It brings nothing. As far as I am concerned, any question tagged C++ is to be answered with the full strength (and thus best practices) of C++11 unless there are specific demands from the OP. –  Matthieu M. Nov 13 '13 at 12:10
1  
I would have thought someone who tagged a question with C wanted a C solution. If they tag it with both, I'd suspect they're using it in a mixed environment. Perhaps it could be code using C++ methods but the interface would have to match C. In which case using std::string in the intermediate code would be valid. But he says he needs a const char * and the likelihood is he can't change that requirement. Telling him to return a std::string isn't going to help much. –  Tom Tanner Nov 13 '13 at 12:36
1  
He needs to call anotherFunction with a char const*, but std::string provides that (using c_str); what is not clear is whether said anotherFunction takes ownership or not. If it does not: anotherFunction(format(...).c_str(), ...); matches perfectly, and the rules of temporaries lifetime in C++ guarantee that the std::string will be destroyed right after anotherFunction calls end which could be perfect. Honestly, the question is really under-specified :( –  Matthieu M. Nov 13 '13 at 12:42

If you do not care abour re-entrancy, you could return pointer to static buffer:

#define MESSAGE_MAX 1024

const char *
CatchMessage (const char *message, ...)
{
    static buffer[MESSAGE_MAX];
    va_list  args;
    va_start (args, message);
    vsnprintf (buffer, MESSAGE_MAX, message, args);
    va_end   (args);
    return buffer;
}

Notes:

  1. This implementation is not thread-safe. If you care about thread safety, use thread local storage instead of static buffer

  2. This implementation has hardcoded upper limit on message length. If that's not desirable, and your compiler is C99 compliant, you could call first vsprintf with NULL as first argument to know result string length, then allocate buffer of that side.

share|improve this answer

In C++, the use of variadic arguments is bad because there is a certain emphasis on type safety (and memory safety). So, you may want to propose a version that is actually type safe (and yes, that is possible), and yet proposes a similar interface:

template <typename H, typename... Args>
void format(std::ostream& out,
            char const* format,
            size_t len,
            H const& head,
            Args const&... args);

// Variations with 'char const (&)[N]' and 'std::string' formats
// as well as variations returning directly a 'std::string'.

Now, the implementation of format is not too difficult; especially without support for positional arguments. A simplistic one can be found below:

inline void format_string(std::ostream& out, char const* const* c) { out << *c; }
inline void format_string(std::ostream& out, std::string const* s) { out << *s; }
inline void format_string(std::ostream& out, void const*); // will throw

template <typename Integral, typename = enable_integral<Integral>::type>
inline void format_integral(std::ostream& out, Integral const* i) { out << *i; }
inline void format_integral(std::ostream& out, void const*); // will throw

inline size_t format_consume(std::ostream& out,
                             char const* const format,
                             size_t const length)
{
    char const* end = format + length;
    char const* current = format;

    do {
        // 1. Find first "format identifier", output stuff in-between
        char const* perc = std::find(current, end, '%');

        if (perc != current) { out.write(current, perc - current); }

        current = perc;

        // 2. %% is % escaped by %, so output it directly
        while (*current == '%' and *(current + 1) == '%') {
            out.put('%');
            current += 2;
        }
    } while (current != end and *current != '%');

    // 3. Return number of characters of format parameter consumed
    return current - format;
} // format_consume

inline void format(std::ostream& out, char const* format, size_t len) {
     size_t const consumed = format_consume(out, format, len);

     if (consumed != len) { throw std::runtime_exception("Missing arguments"); }
} // format

template <typename H, typename typename... Args>
void format(std::ostream& out,
            char const* format,
            size_t len,
            H const& head,
            Args const&... args)
{
     size_t const consumed = format_consume(out, format, len);

     if (consumed == len) { throw std::runtime_exception("Extraneous arguments"); }

     format += consumed;
     len -= consumed;

     assert(*format == '%');

     switch(*(format+1)) {
     case 's': format_string(out, &head); break;
     case 'd': format_integral(out, &head); break;
     default: throw std::runtime_exception("Invalid specifier");
     }

     format(out, format+2, len-2, args...);
} // format

In the general case, it is slightly more hairy, as you need to parse the modifiers, etc... but then, for a production-ready implementation, I advise a look at Boost.Format.

share|improve this answer
char* CatchMessage (size_t size, const char *message, ...)
{
    char result[size];
    va_list  args;
    va_start (args, message);
    vsprintf (result, message, args);
    va_end   (args);
    return result;
}

See this for reference.

And for glglgl: If you want to use the clean way, use vsnprintf(result, size, message, args)

share|improve this answer
1  
Surely not. Where does result point to? Why vsprintf() and not vsnprintf()? –  glglgl Nov 13 '13 at 9:37
    
sorry, my bad :) forgot to change void to char*. Why vsprintf? because if he reads the documentation I linked he will find the safe way by himself ;) –  Theolodis Nov 13 '13 at 9:37
1  
result still points to an undefined location. –  glglgl Nov 13 '13 at 9:38
    
And what if the resulting string has more than 500 characters? –  glglgl Nov 13 '13 at 9:40
    
No, you can't - then it is too late, the code is compiled. What is the problem about using vsnprintf()? Then all problems are gone. –  glglgl Nov 13 '13 at 9:43

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