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I'm writing a program in ANSI-C.

Given these values:

static long long int QList[12] = { 0, 2, 6, 30, 210, 2310, 30030, 510510, 9699690, 223092870, 6469693230, 200560490130 };
static long long int phiList[12] = { 0, 1, 2, 8, 48, 480, 5760, 92160, 1658880, 36495360, 1021870080, 30656102400 };
static int hList[12] = { 0, 1, 2, 4, 12, 60, 60, 120, 360, 3960, 27720, 27720 };

I use them in a loop like this:

double alfa;
static double Log2 = log(2.);

for(k=3; k<8; k++){
    alfa = QList[k]/phiList[k]/ hList[k]/ Log2;
    [.........]
}

If written so, alfa = 0.0000000000000000000 for every "k".

Instead, if i write:

double alfa;
static double Log2 = log(2.);

for(k=3; k<8; k++){
    alfa = QList[k];
    alfa= alfa/ phiList[k];
    alfa = alfa / hList[k];
    alfa = alfa / Log2;
    [.........]
}

Alfa assumes the right values (different from zero). The problem seems to be the division for "hList[k]".

Why?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Division is performed left to right, so your first cases uses integer division for the first two divisions, dropping any remainder.

You can force it to use doubles all the way by casting to double:

alfa = ((double)QList[k])/phiList[k]/ hList[k]/ Log2;
share|improve this answer
    
if it were only the first two divisions, there would not be a problem, since for example: 6/2/2 = 1 => 1/log(2) != 0 – duedl0r Nov 13 '13 at 9:39
    
@duedl0r The loop starts at 3, so your example is never in the loop. – Klas Lindbäck Nov 13 '13 at 9:43
    
yes, you're right :) – duedl0r Nov 13 '13 at 9:45

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