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SO i am trying to connect two linux computers via a wireless connection (in this case my home router) and send real time speech signals ( bi-directional ). Both computers shall be able to receive speech signals and play them back through speakers and also record speech and send it to the other computer.

This whole process shall be done through UDP sockets and RTP( real time protocol ) since TCP would not work properly because of the re-transmission algorithms which exist in TCP/IP and are not desired.

I have the following code which has the functionality of the Echo between a server and client:

/*
    Simple udp server

*/
#include<stdio.h> //printf
#include<string.h> //memset
#include<stdlib.h> //exit(0);
#include<arpa/inet.h>
#include<sys/socket.h>

#define BUFLEN 512  //Max length of buffer
#define PORT 8888   //The port on which to listen for incoming data

void die(char *s)
{
    perror(s);
    exit(1);
}

int main(void)
{
    struct sockaddr_in si_me, si_other;

    int s, i, slen = sizeof(si_other) , recv_len;
    char buf[BUFLEN];

    //create a UDP socket
    if ((s=socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, IPPROTO_UDP)) == -1)
    {
        die("socket");
    }

    // zero out the structure
    memset((char *) &si_me, 0, sizeof(si_me));

    si_me.sin_family = AF_INET;
    si_me.sin_port = htons(PORT);
    si_me.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);

    //bind socket to port
    if( bind(s , (struct sockaddr*)&si_me, sizeof(si_me) ) == -1)
    {
        die("bind");
    }

    //keep listening for data
    while(1)
    {
        printf("Waiting for data...");
        fflush(stdout);

        //try to receive some data, this is a blocking call
        if ((recv_len = recvfrom(s, buf, BUFLEN, 0, (struct sockaddr *) &si_other, &slen)) == -1)
        {
            die("recvfrom()");
        }

        //print details of the client/peer and the data received
        printf("Received packet from %s:%d\n", inet_ntoa(si_other.sin_addr), ntohs(si_other.sin_port));
        printf("Data: %s\n" , buf);

        //now reply the client with the same data
        if (sendto(s, buf, recv_len, 0, (struct sockaddr*) &si_other, slen) == -1)
        {
            die("sendto()");
        }
    }

    close(s);
    return 0;
} 

and the client code :

/*
    Simple udp client

*/
#include<stdio.h> //printf
#include<string.h> //memset
#include<stdlib.h> //exit(0);
#include<arpa/inet.h>
#include<sys/socket.h>

#define SERVER "127.0.0.1"
#define BUFLEN 512  //Max length of buffer
#define PORT 8888   //The port on which to send data

void die(char *s)
{
    perror(s);
    exit(1);
}

int main(void)
{
    struct sockaddr_in si_other;
    int s, i, slen=sizeof(si_other);
    char buf[BUFLEN];
    char message[BUFLEN];

    if ( (s=socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, IPPROTO_UDP)) == -1)
    {
        die("socket");
    }

    memset((char *) &si_other, 0, sizeof(si_other));
    si_other.sin_family = AF_INET;
    si_other.sin_port = htons(PORT);

    if (inet_aton(SERVER , &si_other.sin_addr) == 0) 
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "inet_aton() failed\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    while(1)
    {
        printf("Enter message : ");
        gets(message);

        //send the message
        if (sendto(s, message, strlen(message) , 0 , (struct sockaddr *) &si_other, slen)==-1)
        {
            die("sendto()");
        }

        //receive a reply and print it
        //clear the buffer by filling null, it might have previously received data
        memset(buf,'\0', BUFLEN);
        //try to receive some data, this is a blocking call
        if (recvfrom(s, buf, BUFLEN, 0, (struct sockaddr *) &si_other, &slen) == -1)
        {
            die("recvfrom()");
        }

        puts(buf);
    }

    close(s);
    return 0;
}

i thought if I replaced the IP of the server by the destination computer WLAN IP ( 192.168.178.xxx) it should work but it doesn't.

Can anyone help me with some answers.

share|improve this question
    
Did you try one-directional transmission between two hosts? –  Michael Nov 13 '13 at 9:57
    
And did you try to investigate problem with tcpdump or wireshark? These tools can really help to understand what is going on. –  Michael Nov 13 '13 at 9:59
    
@Michael the thing is i can't get it to work over WLAN at all. I guess I am missing something principle in the whole Wi-fi strategy to transmit speech or any other type of data for that matter –  fer y Nov 13 '13 at 10:01
1  
Try using netcat (sometimes installed as "nc", sometimes as "netcat") to replace either, or both ends of the communiucation. –  Mark Setchell Nov 13 '13 at 10:01
1  
@fery Mark advices a good tool. You may check passing UDP streams through the router. There must be some incoming packets at one host and outgoing packets at another host. And if your program works on local host through loopback then it must give some traffic through WiFi (at least one package - according to you code). There is no difference what physical connection you are using (in case of good signal on WiFi) if you are at the higher OSI level - transport (UDP). If signal is bad then you just may see a lot of packets loss, nothing special. –  Michael Nov 13 '13 at 10:12

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