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I have an Order class that has a list of OrderTransactions and I mapped it with a one-to-many Hibernate mapping like so:

@OneToMany(targetEntity = OrderTransaction.class, cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
public List<OrderTransaction> getOrderTransactions() {
    return orderTransactions;
}

These Order's also have a field orderStatus that are used for filtering with the following Criteria:

public List<Order> getOrderForProduct(OrderFilter orderFilter) {
    Criteria criteria = getHibernateSession()
            .createCriteria(Order.class)
            .add(Restrictions.in("orderStatus", orderFilter.getStatusesToShow()));
    return criteria.list();
}

This works and the result is as excpected.

Now here is my question: Why, when I set the fetch type explicitly to EAGER, do the Order's appear multiple times in the resulting list?

@OneToMany(targetEntity = OrderTransaction.class, fetch = FetchType.EAGER, cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
public List<OrderTransaction> getOrderTransactions() {
    return orderTransactions;
}

How would I have to change my Criteria code to reach the same result with the new setting?

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1  
Have you tried enabling show_sql to see what's going on underneath? –  Mirko N. Jan 3 '10 at 14:29
    
Please add the OrderTransaction and Order classes code as well.\ –  Eran Medan Jan 3 '10 at 15:24
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3 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

This is actually the expected behaviour if I understood your configuration correctly.

You get the same Order instance in any of the results, but since now you are doing a join with the OrderTransaction, it has to return the same amount of results a regular sql join will return

So actually it should apear multiple times. this is explained very well by the author (Gavin King) himself here: It both explains why, and how to still get distinct results


Also mentioned in the Hibernate FAQ :

Hibernate does not return distinct results for a query with outer join fetching enabled for a collection (even if I use the distinct keyword)? First, you need to understand SQL and how OUTER JOINs work in SQL. If you do not fully understand and comprehend outer joins in SQL, do not continue reading this FAQ item but consult a SQL manual or tutorial. Otherwise you will not understand the following explanation and you will complain about this behavior on the Hibernate forum.

Typical examples that might return duplicate references of the same Order object:

List result = session.createCriteria(Order.class)
                    .setFetchMode("lineItems", FetchMode.JOIN)
                    .list();

<class name="Order">
    ...
    <set name="lineItems" fetch="join">

List result = session.createCriteria(Order.class)
                       .list();
List result = session.createQuery("select o from Order o left join fetch o.lineItems").list();

All of these examples produce the same SQL statement:

SELECT o.*, l.* from ORDER o LEFT OUTER JOIN LINE_ITEMS l ON o.ID = l.ORDER_ID

Want to know why the duplicates are there? Look at the SQL resultset, Hibernate does not hide these duplicates on the left side of the outer joined result but returns all the duplicates of the driving table. If you have 5 orders in the database, and each order has 3 line items, the resultset will be 15 rows. The Java result list of these queries will have 15 elements, all of type Order. Only 5 Order instances will be created by Hibernate, but duplicates of the SQL resultset are preserved as duplicate references to these 5 instances. If you do not understand this last sentence, you need to read up on Java and the difference between an instance on the Java heap and a reference to such an instance.

(Why a left outer join? If you'd have an additional order with no line items, the result set would be 16 rows with NULL filling up the right side, where the line item data is for other order. You want orders even if they don't have line items, right? If not, use an inner join fetch in your HQL).

Hibernate does not filter out these duplicate references by default. Some people (not you) actually want this. How can you filter them out?

Like this:

Collection result = new LinkedHashSet( session.create*(...).list() );
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4  
LOL, nicely said on the hibernate FAQ: "If you do not fully understand and comprehend outer joins in SQL, do not continue reading this FAQ item but consult a SQL manual or tutorial. Otherwise you will not understand the following explanation and you will complain about this behavior on the Hibernate forum." –  raoulsson Jan 3 '10 at 15:32
22  
Even if you do understand the following explanation, you might well complain about this behaviour on the Hibernate forum, because it is flipping stupid behaviour! –  Tom Anderson Mar 13 '11 at 12:12
4  
Quite right Tom, Id forgotten about Gavin Kings arrogant attitude. He also says 'Hibernate does not filter out these duplicate references by default. Some people (not you) actually want this' Id be interested when people actually ant this. –  Paul Taylor Feb 28 '12 at 20:52
    
@TomAnderson yes exactly. why would anyone need those duplicates? I am asking out of pure curiosity, since I have no idea... You can create duplicates yourself, as many of them as you wish .. ;-) –  Parobay Jan 24 at 14:16
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In addition to what is mentioned by Eran, another way to get the behavior you want, is to set the result transformer:

criteria.setResultTransformer(Criteria.DISTINCT_ROOT_ENTITY);
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2  
This will work for most cases....except for when you try to use Criteria to Fetch 2 collections/associations. –  JamesD Mar 28 '12 at 21:26
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try

@Fetch (FetchMode.SELECT) 

for example

@OneToMany(targetEntity = OrderTransaction.class, fetch = FetchType.EAGER, cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
@Fetch (FetchMode.SELECT)
public List<OrderTransaction> getOrderTransactions() {
return orderTransactions;

}

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FetchMode.SELECT increases number of SQL queries fired by Hibernate but ensures only one instance per root entity record. Hibernate will fire a select for every child record in this case. So you should account for it with respect to the performance considerations. –  Bipul Kumar 1 hour ago
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