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What is, in your opinion, the most surprising, weird, strange or really "WTF" language feature you have encountered?

Please only one feature per answer.

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@gablin I think if you combined LISP delimiters with PERL regex using javascript parsing you would cover 90% of the WTF... –  Talvi Watia Sep 19 '10 at 23:41

320 Answers 320

This is nothing strange or surprising, but it is something that made me always say WTF:

Case sensitivity in syntax, or in identifier names.

Most languages that have it just seem to have it because C has it. There is no good reason for it.

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It's especially scary for loosely-typed declaration-free languages like Python, which will silently create a new totalsum variable, when really you meant totalSum. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 5 '10 at 5:43
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I used to think that way, but I've come around to the fact that forcing all instances of the same identifier to use the same casing avoids some problems with later readability/maintenance when someone decides they will add code using a different "spelling". The modern IDE (Intellisense) feature of typing only a few letters of each identifier to type it out helps a lot. However as said, in declaration-free languages case sensitivity is suicide. –  David Jan 5 '10 at 14:23
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Case sensitivity is not implemented in a language so you can use totalsum and totalSum for different variables. It's there so you don't use it for them both for the same variable. It makes all references to a variable consistent which is a good thing. It's just a side-effect that you can use it for similar-but-different variable names. TRWTF is when people do use it for that purpose. –  David Jan 5 '10 at 22:33
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@BlueRaja: You're right, in languages where a variable doesn't need to be declared before using it this problem becomes far more sinister. But I have seen variables with different cases but the same name being used in Java. In my perfect world I would have 2 constraints: (1) variable names are case-sensitive AND (2) variable names cannot be the same as other variable names (ignoring case). That way variables names always look exactly the same and cannot be confused with other variables. [For clarity: there are 2 Davids commenting here. Mine was the third comment.] –  David Jan 6 '10 at 3:31
2  
-1 Case folding for i8n char sets is not always obvious. –  David J. Liszewski Aug 12 '10 at 13:33

In SQL Server you may end up with a nasty surprise if you use select * in your production code. Using select * is not considered as a good practice anyway but it is good to know of some of the interesting behaviour.

See question “select * from table” vs “select colA,colB,etc from table” interesting behaviour in SqlServer2005 for more details

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Haskell's use of Maybe and Just. Maybe a is a type constructor that returns a type of Just a, but Maybe Int won't accept just an Int, it requires it to be a Just Int or Nothing. So in essence in haskell parlance Just Int is about as much of an Int as an apple is an orange. The only connection is that Just 5 returns a type of Maybe Interger, which can be constructed with the function Just and an Integer argument. This makes sense but is about as hard to explain as it can theoretically be, which is the purpose of haskell right? So is Just really JustKindaLikeButNotAtAll yea sorta, and is Maybe really a KindaLooksLikeOrIsNothing, yea sorta again.

-- Create a function that returns a Maybe Int, and return a 5, which know is definitly Int'able
>  let x :: Maybe Int; x = 5;
<interactive>:1:24:
    No instance for (Num (Maybe Int))
      arising from the literal `5' at <interactive>:1:24
    Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (Num (Maybe Int))
    In the expression: 5
    In the definition of `x': x = 5

>  Just 5  
Just 5
it :: Maybe Integer

    -- Create a function x which takes an Int
>  let x :: Int -> Int; x _ = 0;
x :: Int -> Int
-- Try to give it a Just Int
>  x $ Just 5                   

<interactive>:1:4:
    Couldn't match expected type `Int' against inferred type `Maybe t'
    In the second argument of `($)', namely `Just 5'
    In the expression: x $ Just 5
    In the definition of `it': it = x $ Just 5

Good luck reading this, I hope its right.

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2  
It makes perfect sense in a statically typed language for a function expecting arguments of type Foo to refuse arguments of type Bar. Just is a function a -> Maybe a, Nothing is a Maybe a, fromJust is a function Maybe a -> a. Hope this helps. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 6 '10 at 22:03
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The only WTF is how you're totally missing the point. I don't know your background, but take String in Java, for example. It is actually a "Maybe" String, because it can be String or null. Unfortunately, the compiler does nothing to prevent you from using it as a String, which cause the dreaded null pointer exception. Well, Haskell doesn't have null. If you do something that may or may not return a result, such as getting the index of a character in a string, then you return Maybe Integer. The receiving code uses pattern match to distinguish between Just Integer and Nothing. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 8 '10 at 2:12

In MySQL string comparisons are case-insensitive.

> SELECT * FROM blah WHERE foo = 'BAR';
> SELECT * FROM blah WHERE foo = 'Bar';
> SELECT * FROM blah WHERE foo = 'bAr';

Are all equivelent. Not only that they will match any value of foo that looks like 'bar' (e.g. if foo = 'bar' it will match for BAR, baR, bAR, etc.).

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this is by design and configurable –  kurast Jan 6 '10 at 14:03
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Like said, it is configurable, not a definite decision made by the developers. There's nothing weird about making it configurable nor the selected default. –  Carlos Jan 13 '10 at 14:23

Not so long ago, when I first descoverd the C Language in my CS class, it was very strange to see the way pointers behaived. we just wrote programs and guess what it would do, until they get the right behavior

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pointers are the most natural thing in the world :P –  Hassan Syed Jan 7 '10 at 2:23
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Sometimes I feel at a loss that I never had a "Aha!" moment with pointers. Somehow pointers always felt natural to me. Same goes for recursion. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 7 '10 at 3:00

The C preprocessor and its usages. Specifically preprocessor metaprogramming and using the preprocessor to generate portable code -- total mindfcuk.

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Labeled break and continue statements in Java..

They allow you to break out of multiple control-blocks with a single break.

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C# has a feature called "extension methods", which are roughly analogous to Ruby mix-ins - Essentially, you can add a method to any pre-existing class definition (for instance, you oould add "reverse()" to String if you were so inclined). That alone is fine- The "Weird" part is that you can add these extension methods, with a method body and everything, to an interface. On the one hand, this can be handy as a way to add a single method to a whole swath of classes which aren't part of the same inheritance tree. On the other, you're adding fleshed out methods to interfaces, essentially breaking the very definition of an interface.

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Unfortunately you cannot do everything you can with Ruby mixins, especially adding per-instance state (without doing crazy stuff with dictionaries...). Also, extension methods do not break the definition of an interface in any way. You are not breaking the contract. You are not adding anything to the interface. The ability to call it as if it was part of the interface is just syntax sugar. Extension methods are just like any other static helper method, with that fine sugar on top. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 7 '10 at 19:25

Python's ternary operator

In Python, the C ternary operator (C++ example: bool isNegative = i < 0 ? true : false;) is available as syntactic sugar:

>>> i = 1
>>> "It is positive" if i >= 0 else "It is negative!"
'It is positive'
>>> i = -1
>>> "It is positive" if i >= 0 else "It is negative!"
'It is negative!'

It's not really strange but a feature. The odd thing is the changed order (A if CONDITION else B) in comparison to the (IMO more logical) order in C (CONDITION ? A : B).

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In C, a[b][c] is exactly the same thing as c[b[a]].

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this is a dupe of the current highest-voted answer... –  rmeador Jan 7 '10 at 20:55

In PHP, you have to explicitly reference globals and explicitly use this-> for class variables. Makes refactoring fun. You cannot promote a variable/argument to a global or a class member without finding all points of usage.

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Perl

my %h1 = map { $_ => 1 } qw/foo bar baz/;    // construct an 'is_member' type lookup table
my %h2 = map { "$_" => 1 } qw/foo bar baz/;

the second line is a syntax error even though to even an experienced perl programmer it looks like it would be identical. The downside to perl always trying to do what you mean, not what you said.

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Why the downvote? –  Rob Van Dam Jan 9 '10 at 22:06

this made me stunning

#define _ -F<00||--F-OO--;
int F=00,OO=00;main(){F_OO();printf("%1.3f\n",4.*-F/OO/OO);}F_OO()
{
            _-_-_-_
       _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
    _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
  _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
 _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
 _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
 _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
 _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
  _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
    _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
       _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
           _-_-_-_
}
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Note that the program relies on non-ANSI preprocessor feature, that _- is expanded to --F. In ANSI C, it is two separate tokens, so expands to - followed by -F. The output is therefore not the value of pi as the author intended. See stackoverflow.com/questions/841646/… for more. –  Alok Singhal Jan 8 '10 at 22:44
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-1. This is, IIRC, an IOCCC entry to calculate PI. What is the strange language feature here? –  Roger Pate Jan 10 '10 at 8:59

Smalltalk:

Have a class method in a class Test, that returns a constant string:

method1
    ^ 'niko'

You should expect that this method constantly returns the string 'niko' whatever happens. But that is not the case.

s := Test method1 

(Set s to 'niko'.)

s at: 4 put: $i.

(Set s to 'niki'.)

s := Test method1

(Set s to 'niki' again.)

So, what happens is that the second line of code permanently changed method1 to return 'niki' rather than 'niko', even though the source code of the method was not updated.

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((char[]) String.class.getDeclaredField("value").get("niko"))[3] = 'i' –  akuhn Jan 9 '10 at 16:59

Try, except, else

try:     pass
except:  pass
else:    pass
finally: pass

If no exception was caught the else part is executed.

Makes sense, but at first I really hadn't any clue what it does.

Example:

def show_square(string):
  try:
    n = int(string, 10)
  except ValueError:
    print "I can't do that, Dave."
  else:
    print n * n
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Since I've learned this feature in Python, I'm really missing it in other languages. –  vit Jan 7 '10 at 21:28
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@Chinmay Kanchi: That's wrong too, else block is executed if no exection where raised at all. If error happens in else block it isn't caught (as opposed to print n*n being put after n=int(...)) and if exception is raised and processed in except clause, else block isn't executed (as opposed to print being put after all try..except structure) –  ymv Jan 11 '10 at 14:50

shift;

sometimes you see it in the very first line of a perl method to get read of self pointer

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In ColdFusion

Struct (aka Java HashMap) is passed by reference.

You'd have thought other data type behaves like Java...

Array is passed by value, wtf!

List is just a plain old comma-separated string!

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In Unity,

GameObject.Find("MyObject")

will return your object normally. However, if you do something like this:

GameObject.Find("MyObject").active = false;
//do other stuff
if (GameObject.Find("MyObject").active)
{
    //do stuff
}

Then you will get a null reference. In Unity iPhone, this code will often work fine in the editor but will cause a SIGBUS when running from the iPhone. The problem is that GameObject.Find() will only locate active objects, so even if you're just checking to see if it's active, you are effectively calling if (null.active) .

To make it work right, you've got to store it prior to making it inactive.

GameObject obj = GameObject.Find("MyObject");
obj.active = false;
//do other stuff
if (obj.active)
{
    //do stuff
}

Arguably that's better practice anyway, but the way Unity treats inactive objects in general is quite weird. It appears to unload a large portion of the inactive object (textures, etc.) but not all of it, so inactive objects can still eat up a lot of memory.

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In J, most primitives (a.k.a. functions) are monadic (one argument) or dyadic (two arguments, one to the left, one to the right). But the amend primitive takes 3 (I think it's the only one, besides foreigns). It's understandable that it would take 3, but it just looks... wrong at first.

vector =: i. 10   NB. Vector will be 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
(10) (0) } vector NB. Will yield 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
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In awk, arrays start at index 1, which is confusing the least.

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In Python, at least for me, this was very wft! the first time I saw it:

>>> "ja " * 5
'ja ja ja ja ja '

You can multiply strings! WTF??

PS: I think this is because x * n means: n times x so, 5 times "ja " is "ja ""ja ""ja ""ja ""ja " and because you can concatenate strings like this:

>>> "ja ""ja ""ja ""ja ""ja "
'ja ja ja ja ja '

That two codes have the same result (and maybe are just the same)

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The implict variables\constants and mutable constants in ruby

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What datatype is foo?

SELECT TOP 1
   NULL AS foo
INTO
   dbo.bar
FROM
   sys.columns --trivial

Why does everything go to zero?

SELECT CAST('' AS int), CAST('' AS datetime), CAST('' AS float)

...except this

SELECT CAST('' AS decimal)
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In C#, the following code generates compiler error "Cannot convert from method group to Delegate". Though the logic behind is reasonable, it still feels strange to me.

control.BeginInvoke(delegate { DoSomething(); });
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because you should write "control.BeginInvoke(DoSomething);" –  Behrooz Jun 19 '10 at 7:10
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I would cast this to the Action type. The word "delegate" seems to be not a class at all. –  vorrtex Dec 6 '10 at 13:04

A Java source file can end with the character \u001a (control-Z).

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Quite a few C compilers still recognize this as well. –  Joshua Aug 13 '10 at 21:11

In Java, there is some inconsistency as to how Strings handle the == operator depending on how it was constructed.

String a = "Hello";
String b = "Hello";
System.out.println(a == b ); // prints true.
String c = new String("Hello");
String d = new String("Hello"); 
System.out.println(c == d ); // prints false
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The behavior is consistent, as it only compares the references, a and b reference the same interned string while c and d reference two different string objects. Only compare java objects with == if you want to check for the same instance, if you want to compare two objects use c.equals(d). Using == to compare strings just asks for trouble –  josefx Feb 9 '10 at 13:57

Here is one about python:

>>> print 07
7
>>> print 08
  File "<stdin>", line 1
    print 08
           ^
SyntaxError: invalid token

Ain't that a beauty?

Especially unthoughtful when you think of how human write dates, which has the following effect:

datetime.date(2010,02,07) # ok
datetime.date(2010,02,08) # error!

(the reason is that 0x is interpreted as octal, so print 010 prints 8!)

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Yet another reason to switch to Python 3 -- "print(07)" is also a syntax error. –  Dietrich Epp Feb 18 '10 at 18:37

In Scheme there are no reserved identifiers. So, the following expression evaluates to 1:

((lambda (lambda) lambda) (let ((let 1)) let))

Note that there is a restriction on definitions within a given scope: no definition may redefine an identifier used to define identifiers within that scope, so the following is a syntax error:

(begin (define define 1) define)
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Well the first thing that came to my mind was 'noop', my brain did the same thing when I first came across it!

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working perfectly, then. –  foo Jan 24 '11 at 14:03

In J, foreigns (!:) are various functions bunched together. The left argument is a category, where as the right are often (but not always) incremental values for different... stuff. For example:

    2!:55 NB. Close console
    9!:10 NB. Set print precision
    6!:0  NB. Actual time
    6!:2  NB. Execution time
    4!:3  NB. Loaded scripts

Of course, the smart thing is to wrap them, but some you just commit to memory. BTW, all of those are, come to think of it, triadic, with 2 arguments to the right and one to the left. None of the above will work unless you give them a final valid argument.

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