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What is, in your opinion, the most surprising, weird, strange or really "WTF" language feature you have encountered?

Please only one feature per answer.

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@gablin I think if you combined LISP delimiters with PERL regex using javascript parsing you would cover 90% of the WTF... –  Talvi Watia Sep 19 '10 at 23:41

320 Answers 320

How about the neat system-dependent overflows causing year rollovers in (MRI/C) Ruby and MacRuby (but not in JRuby) followed by localtime errors for a larger number. Not a common issue, but it is strange:

$ ruby -version
ruby 1.8.7 (2009-06-12 patchlevel 174) [universal-darwin10.0]
$ irb
>> Time.at(67767976233550799)
=> Tue Dec 31 23:59:59 -0500 2147483647
>> Time.at(67767976233550800)
=> Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 -0500 -2147483648
>> Time.at(67768036191694799)
=> Wed Dec 31 23:59:59 -0500 -2147481749
>> Time.at(67768036191694800)
ArgumentError: localtime error
...
Maybe IRB bug!!

This may be specific to 64-bit environments, though.

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FORTRAN isn't a really WTF moment but rather it's more a "Why do I need to type all this garbage moment"

IF(12 .gt. 11) THEN
 // Do some magic
ENDIF

The ".gt." threw me off when I was playing with the language for a bit until I realized it was the ">" symbol. Oh how I love not being a biology major and having to dabble in this crap day to day

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I personally like the fact that whitespace is not significant so IF(12.GT.11)THEN and I F ( 1 2 . G T . 1 1 ) T H E N are identical. –  D.Shawley Jan 4 '10 at 23:34
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How many 'C' bugs have been caused by "if (a=1)" ? –  Martin Beckett Jan 5 '10 at 16:23
3  
FORTRAN predates both ASCII and EBCDIC, and was first implemented on a computer with a 6-bit character set. So you couldn't count on < and > being available, hence the need for substitutes. More recent versions of Fortran do support the < and > operators. –  dan04 Jun 9 '10 at 6:08
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@D.Shawley whats the real advantage, that whitespace is not significant? (there is none) –  Joschua Oct 12 '10 at 9:17

In Bash, variables can appear to be both scalars and arrays:

$ a=3
$ echo $a
3
$ echo ${a[@]}    # treat it like an array
3
$ declare -p a    # but it's not
declare -- a="3"
$ a[1]=4          # treat it like an array
$ echo $a         # acts like it's scalar
3
$ echo ${a[@]}    # but it's not
3 4
$ declare -p a
declare -a a='([0]="3" [1]="4")'
$ a=5             # treat it like a scalar
$ echo $a         # acts like it's scalar
5
$ echo ${a[@]}    # but it's not
5 4
$ declare -p a
declare -a a='([0]="5" [1]="4")'

ksh does the same things, but uses typeset instead of declare.

When you do this in zsh, you get substring assignment instead of arrays:

$ a=3
$ a[2]=4          # zsh is one-indexed by default
$ echo $a
34
$ a[3]=567
$ echo $a
34567
$ a[3]=9
$ echo $a
34967
$ a[3]=123         # here it overwrites the first character, but inserts the others
$ echo $a
3412367
$ a=(1 2 3)
$ echo $a
1 2 3              # it's an array without needing to use ${a[@]} (but it will work)
$ a[2]=99          # what about assignments?
$ echo $a
1 99 3
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In Common Lisp, arrays with zero dimensions are strange, and naturally, they have read syntax.

? (aref #0A5)
5
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A Fortran compiler that I used years ago had the interesting feature that: (a) Numbers were stored high-byte first; (b) Numbers were passed to subroutines by address; (c) There was no compile-time checking of length.

So you could write a program like this: (Excuse me if I mess up the syntax. It's been a long time since I've written Fortran.)

INTEGER*2 FUNCTION TIMESTWO (INTEGER*2 N)
RETURN N*2

... THEN CALL THIS SOMEWHERE WITH A LONG INTEGER ...

INTEGER*4 I, J

I=42
J=TIMESTWO(I)

The final value of J is ... zero !

Why? Because the passed in value is 4 bytes, but the called function looks at only the first two bytes. As the first two are zero, it doubles the zero and returns it. This return value is then converted back to four bytes.

This was very mysterious when I first encountered it. Almost every number I passed in to certain functions got interpreted as zero!

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Perl's CORE::open and standard library having elements of object orientation masked with a procedural interface: open ( my $fh, '>', 'foobar' ); open is a constructor that operates on the reference returned by my(), and takes the arguments '>', and 'foobar'. Moreover, that being an object that is a blessed typeglob (meaning it can't hold state inside the object).

More information on my perlmonks post IO::File vs CORE::open here: http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=763565

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I think this one isn't actually a "language feature" (C) and I'm quite possibly being widely ignorant in posting it, but I couldn't figure why this happens, so I'll ask. If it turns out to be related to some odd language feature.. well, it really made me "WTF", so it's worth this place.

int a = 0;
int *p = &a;

printf("%d, %d, %d.\n", *p, (*p)++, *p); // Outputs "1, 0, 0.\n" on MinGW's GCC 4.4.1

Why?

-- edit

Just got it, and it's not big deal. I can sense the C++ gurus laughing at me now. I guess the order in which function parameters are evaluated is unspecified, so compilers are free to call them as they wish (and I think I've read that one somewhere in boost's documentation). In this case, the argument statements were evaluated backwards, probably reflecting the calling convention of the function.

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In Lisp you can copy a list, and you can copy a vector, and you can copy a struct, and you can copy a CLOS object...

... but you cannot copy an array or a hash table.

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JCL Conditional execution.

//STEP02 EXEC PGM=PROG02,COND=(4,GT,STEP01) .

This features allows you to run or not run a step depending on the return code from previous steps. Quite a nice feature really.

Except for a couple of small features which turn the logic inside out and backwards.

First the step does NOT run if the condition is true.

Secondly the 4,GT,STEP01 actually means "if the return code from STEP01 is greater than 4"

So the whole thing means "Do not run this step if the return code from STEP01 is greater than 4". Which is the almost but not quite the same as a naive interpretation "Run the step if 4 is greater than the return code from STEP01".

Given that only time you ever look at these things seriously is about 2.30 am with a frantic nightshift operator at the other end of the line this double ambiguity leads to serious headaches.

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Reverse Polish Notation (RPN). That means the arguments precede the function. Or, in other words, you add two and two by writing 2 2 +.

Languages featuring that WTF include Forth, Postscript (yes, of laser printers) and Factor.

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In what way is RPN a WTF? –  David Thornley Feb 18 '10 at 20:30
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@David It is unusual, and completely different from standard convention. –  Daniel C. Sobral Feb 18 '10 at 21:59
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@Daniel: It isn't unusual where it's used, and a whole lot of things in computer languages are different from standard non-computer conventions. RPN has been used in some very popular calculators, so many people have some familiarity with it. Forth isn't exactly a mainstream language, but I don't see RPN as a WTF. –  David Thornley Feb 18 '10 at 22:34
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@Daniel: Less so than maybe ten years ago, when a whole lot of engineers used RPN calculators. Since then, HP is no longer run by engineers. Still, one of the early iPhone calculator apps worked with reverse Polish (I bought it, as I dislike doing complicated things with infix calculators). Moreover, anybody who's taken a compilers class will be familiar with it. I think it's more common than you think. –  David Thornley Feb 19 '10 at 15:47
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It's not a WTF, it's a FTW (double entendre). –  Erich Mirabal Jul 21 '10 at 17:33

Something bizarre -- VBScript having both a Null keyword and a Nothing keyword (Null is missing data and Nothing is a missing object). Why not just have one keyword...? Most other languages seem to do fine with one!

Visual Basic 6.0 and of course "Classic ASP" code (because it uses VBScript) have the same bizarrity. And in Visual Basic old and new we also have DBNull.

The situation is improving however, as in Visual Basic.NET Null has at last gone away so that Null is unused and only Nothing and DBNull are used.

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@David: Just use a nullable character (Character?) when you need one... –  configurator Feb 20 '11 at 4:27

A very tiny thing that annoyed me in COBOL was that there was no dedicated modulo operation. Instead you could do a division specifying that you only wanted whole number results and store the rest in a different variable. Since COBOL is very sensitive when it comes to variables that means that you ended up with a variable you didn't really need, i.e. the actual result of the division. This is the story of how I once named a variable "USELESS" - that was the most appropriate name I could think of.

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I once wrote a PHP function which returned a reference, except when there was an error, it'd return null. Except you can't just return null; since that's not a reference to anything. This meant I had to define a variable, set it to null and return that. Of course, the variable was named $thisIsAStupidFxxxingVariableIHadToDefineBecauseOtherwiseThisFunctionShitsItsel‌​f. (yes these were early days in my PHP development career) –  nickf Jan 13 '10 at 12:44
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In these kinds of situations, I name the variable "fcrt" for Fxxxing Compiler Requires This. –  dan04 Jun 9 '10 at 6:11

I can't believe this one isn't on here yet: JSF property access.

In a JSF UI tag, you would put the value of a property from the server-side object into the interface by referencing it thusly:

<h:inputText value="#{myObject.property}></h:inputText>

The thing is that Java doesn't support properties, so you have to write methods starting with get and set in order to link the UI object to the "property" on the server.

public void setProperty(String property){...}
public String getProperty(){...}

This confused me when I first learned JSF and I still consider it WTF-worthy... even though there's really no other way to do it until Java implements support for C#-style properties.

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In SQL server (MS at least):

This will always evaluate to false:

IF @someint <> NULL

Given:

DECLARE @int INT

SET @int = 6

IF @int <> NULL
BEGIN
    Print '@int is not null'
END
ELSE
BEGIN
    Print '@int is evaluating to null'
END

The output will be:

@int is evaluating to null

It must be written:

IF @someint IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
END

Who put English majors on the SQL Team! :)

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in Ruby ...

i=true
while(i)
   i=false
   a=2
end
puts defined?(a) // returns true
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How is that strange? –  poke Feb 8 '10 at 17:44
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I don't even know the language and that's clear. Implicit declarations like that aren't "supposed" to be narrowly scoped in any language supporting them. –  Potatoswatter Feb 18 '10 at 19:25
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the "a" variable is defined inner of the while block and exists after the while block goes out –  Lucas Feb 19 '10 at 16:01
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I believe JavaScript does this too unless you put the var keyword before the declaration. Python also does this, and there's no way around it AFAIK... really screws you up when you thought you redefined the variable later in a different scope, but didn't, and its still using the same value from a previous loop...confusing as hell! –  Mark Jul 26 '10 at 18:58

This is not a strange feature, in fact it makes total sense if you think about it, but gave me a WTF moment nevertheless.

In C++(and in C#), subclasses of a base cannot access private and protected members on the instance of the base.

class Base {
protected:
 m_fooBar;
};

class Derived: public Base {
public:
 void Test(Base& baseInstance) {
  m_fooBar=1; //OK
  baseInstance.m_fooBar = 1; //Badness
  //This, however is OK:
  ((Derived&)baseInstance).m_fooBar = 1; //OK
 }
};
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Subjunctive case in English.

Oh wait, did you mean programming languages? Then using (macro) in C to bypass the preprocessor #define of macro(). E.g., if someone has #define free(...), (free)(...) will not be the same as free(...).

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In PHP, the following:

<?php $foo = 'abc'; echo "{$foo";

is a syntax error.

If you actually wanted {, followed by the contents of $foo, you'd have to use .:

<?php $foo = 'abc'; echo '{' . $foo;
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Processing (processing.org) is a language based on Java. In simple terms, processing compiler is Java preprocessor that translates Processing-specific syntax into Java.

Due to the language's design, it has a few surprises:

Processing's class are compiled into Java inner class, this causes some annoyance, like private variables that isn't really private

class Foo {
  private int var = 0; // compiles fine
}

void setup() {
  Foo f = new Foo();
  print(f.var); // but does not causes compile error
}

also missing draw() function causes event handlers to not be called:

// void draw() {} // if you forgot to include this
void mousePressed() {
  print("this is never called");
}
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In C++, the ability to create a protected abstract virtual base pure virtual private destructor.

This is a pure virtual private destructor that is inherited from a protected abstract virtual base.

IOW, a destructor that can only be called by members or friends of the class (private), and which is assigned a 0 (pure virtual) in the base class (abstract base) that declares it, and which will be defined later/overriden in a derived class that shares the multiple-inherited base (virtual base) in a protected way.

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Not technically a language WTF, but an architecture one.

http://www.6502.org/tutorials/6502opcodes.html#JMP

6502 assembly, indirect JMP:

Note that there is no carry associated with the indirect jump so:

AN INDIRECT JUMP MUST NEVER USE A

VECTOR BEGINNING ON THE LAST BYTE

OF A PAGE

For example if address $3000 contains $40, $30FF contains $80, and $3100 contains $50, the result of JMP ($30FF) will be a transfer of control to $4080 rather than $5080 as you intended i.e. the 6502 took the low byte of the address from $30FF and the high byte from $3000.

So adding a single byte to your code could make your indirect jump go wildly off target.

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Perl can automatically convert base 26 into base 10, if you can live with yourself in the morning...

$ perl -E "say lc (@a='a'..'asdf')"
30530
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The rest of these have nothing on the astounding Ruby Flip-Flop Operator:

p = proc {|a,b| a..b ? "yes" : "no" }

p[false,false]    => "no"
p[true,false]     => "yes"
p[false,false]    => "yes"   # ???
p[false,true]     => "yes"
p[false,false]    => "no"

Yes, program state stored in the interpreter's parse tree. Things like this are why it takes forever to make a compliant Ruby implementation. But I forgive you, Ruby <3

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s a="a=""a=""""a"""",@a=""""2N"""",a=""""c=""""_(""""22""""?@a),@a"",@a,a=""a"",a(c)=""S+""_c,e=$T(@@a@(c))",@a

this is a nice one-liner in COS (cache objectscript). The funny thing to note here are 5 different modes of code-indirection *G

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At Ohio State University they teach programming using a bastard C++ language called Resolve/C++. Resolve/C++ uses a design-by-contract methodology to everything. It requires you to mathematically model out components and methods within comments that get compiled so that it forces you to maintain a requires/ensures relationship between methods and objects.

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That's actually sort of cool, although I don't see why they'd stick so adamantly to C++... there are plenty of other languages that have support for design by contract, some that enforce it strictly: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design_by_contract#Language_support . Maybe it's just me because I started off with C++, but I don't see it as being a very good language pedagogically. –  Rei Miyasaka Nov 20 '10 at 0:26

In retrospect, FORTRAN's computed goto is pretty odd. Wikipedia tells me some BASICs outdo it.

Another famous favourite is Algol 60's call by name parameter passing.

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You sir must be very old. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 5 '10 at 5:27

I've always wondered about the purpose of this function in the Math class of the Java Core library:

static double expm1(double x);  // Returns e^x - 1.
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Maybe, but you could always use exp(x)-1 instead of expm1(x), it doesnt even have more letters. –  Benno Jan 5 '10 at 0:22
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You should try using this other cool feature called Javadoc. ;) "Note that for values of x near 0, the exact sum of expm1(x) + 1 is much closer to the true result of e^x than exp(x)." java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/… –  MatrixFrog Jan 5 '10 at 5:47
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e^x-1 is a function which very often turns up in physics and engineering and also very often x is quite small. In that case the obvious Math.exp(x)-1.0 is very imprecise. For small x you get 1.0000000yyyyyy as result of Math.exp(x) with yyy... the desired result. As you see the leading 1.0 does nothing than wasting accuracy. –  Thorsten S. Jan 6 '10 at 11:47

In C#, why is this not legal?

public class MyClass<T>
    where T: Enum
{

}

It'd be pretty cool to be able to add extension methods on Enum's along with Func<T> where the T would be the enum you're extending so that you can get type inference on that enum.

Re the comment: Yes, you can extend an actual enum, but here's the difference:

You CAN do this:

public static void DoSomethingWithEnum(this Enum e)
{
   //do whatever
}

but what if you want to take a Func with your method that would be the same type as your enum:

public static void DoSomethingWithEnum<T>(this T e, Func<T,bool> func )
   where T: Enum
{
   //do whatever
}

That way, you can call your method like so:

DayOfWeek today = DayOfWeek.Monday;
today.DoSomethingWithEnum(e => e != DayOfWeek.Sunday);

or something like that. You get the idea... THAT'S not possible, and I'm not sure why...

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@SLaks: be sure to read the comments in Eric's answer. He actually made a mistake in saying the CLR does not support it. It is in the spec and there is a working implementation of a library with such constraints (code.google.com/p/unconstrained-melody) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 6 '10 at 21:40

C# yield statement, not weird but pretty useful.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9k7k7cf0(VS.80).aspx

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