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What is, in your opinion, the most surprising, weird, strange or really "WTF" language feature you have encountered?

Please only one feature per answer.

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5  
@gablin I think if you combined LISP delimiters with PERL regex using javascript parsing you would cover 90% of the WTF... –  Talvi Watia Sep 19 '10 at 23:41

320 Answers 320

In Java, if the value of x is NaN then x == x returns false and x != x returns true.

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14  
This is in the definition of NaN, it should be true in any language which uses IEE floating point. If the value is not a number it cannot be equal to anything. –  Scott Wales Jan 8 '10 at 3:08

javascript:

parseInt('06'); // 6
parseInt('08'); // 0
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6  
Numbers prefixed with 0 are octals. –  BalusC Feb 18 '10 at 20:33
1  
@Bozho What is strange about it? 8 is not a valid number in octal so it just wraps back around to 0. Remember that octal is 0 to 7. –  Cromulent May 14 '10 at 17:11
5  
It's counter-intuitive, since when parsing Int you would expect it to do it in decimal notation and strip leading zeros. This has lead to alot of annoying bugs... who needs to ever parse octal numbers anyway? Other languages (more intuitively) default to decimal which can be overriden with radix parameter. –  Mavrik May 24 '10 at 8:46

The entirety of the Malbolge programming language: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malbolge

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Looking for a function? Why not a language?

I love PHP but it always seems to be built like this "Oh s***t! I forgot this! Let's just add another argument to the function" which result in this :

str_replace($search, $replace, $subject, ...)
strstr($subject, $search, ...)

Notice the extra underscore and the different order for the arguments.

Here is something else

$a = array( 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd');

print_r($a); //Prints array( 0 => 'a', 1 => 'b',    2 => 'c', 3 => 'd');
unset($a[2]); //Destroys the element 2 of the list
print_r($a); //Prints array( 0 => 'a', 1 => 'b',    3 => 'd');
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1  
strstr is like that to copy its behaviour in C. And php's arrays are stored associative. If you don't want indexes to break, don't use unset but actual array functions like array_splice. –  poke Aug 14 '10 at 16:21

In JavaScript:

1 / 0; // Infinity
1 / -0; // -Infinity
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7  
This behavior is defined by IEEE754 -> grouper.ieee.org/groups/754 Other curiosities of this specification is positive and negative NaN:s, +0, 0 and -0. –  Esko Sep 10 '10 at 10:35
6  
so what? it's just the 1/epsilon limit for epsilon \downto 0 and \epsilon \upto -0 –  Tobias Kienzler Sep 10 '10 at 11:02
7  
Thats because JavaScript was created ^^COUGH^^glued together^^COUGH^^ on the assumption that most of its users would be idiots, and therefore would be confused by the meaningless errors. What they didn't want was this: "Error on line 5: Division by Zero, WTF does this error message mean????" What they got was this "HLP MY PRGM DOSNT WRK!!!" –  Joe D Sep 10 '10 at 14:33
3  
Ironically, the answers it provides mathematically are correct. –  Talvi Watia Sep 14 '10 at 3:57
1  
@Ralph your counter-example is flawed per infinity is not (necessarily) commutative. see: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commutative –  Talvi Watia Sep 17 '10 at 12:43

C++'s most vexing parse:

struct S
{
    S() {} //default constructor
};

int main() {

    S s(); // this is not a default construction, it declares a function named s that takes no arguments and returns S.
}
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1  
Makes perfect sense to me, it's just declaring a delegate. –  Justin Morgan Mar 24 '11 at 19:22

PL/SQL allows to declare variables and function names that are keywords. The following is compilable PL/SQL:

create or replace 
  function function 
  return number  as
  return number;
begin 
  function.return := 4;
  return   return;
end function;
/

This created a function named function. Later:

SQL> select function from dual;

  FUNCTION
----------
         4
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C#'s default inheritance model wins my vote:

public class Animal
{
    public string Speak() { return "unknown sound" ; }
}

public class Dog : Animal
{
    public string Speak() { return "Woof!" ; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main( string[] args )
    {
        Dog aDog = new Dog() ;
        Animal anAnimal = (Animal) aDog ;

        Console.WriteLine( "Dog sez '{0}'" , aDog.Speak() ) ;
        Console.WriteLine( "Animal sez '{0}'" , anAnimal.Speak() ) ;

        return ;
    }
}

Running the program give the following as a result:

Dog says 'Woof!' Animal says 'unknown sound'

Getting that sort of behavior should require the programmer to go out of the programmer's way. The subclass instance doesn't stop being what it is because it's been upcast to its supertype. Instead you have to explicitly request the expected (and almost always desired) result:

public class Animal
{
    public virtual string Speak() { return "unknown sound" ; }
}

public class Dog : Animal
{
    public override string Speak() { return "Woof!" ; }
}
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5  
This was very much deliberate on the part of the C# designers, and with good reason. Anders Hejlsberg explains why here: artima.com/intv/nonvirtual.html –  Will Vousden Dec 2 '10 at 21:24
4  
Hmmm, that's pretty rad. I'm so deep in C#, I didn't even realize that was unusual. –  CodexArcanum Dec 3 '10 at 0:28
1  
Yes, I know Hejlsberg did it that way for a reason. Doesn't change the fact that the default behavior is opposite what any reasonable person would expect -- that the behavioral differences implemented by a subtype would, when upcast to its supertype, would still manifest themselves. –  Nicholas Carey Dec 3 '10 at 18:04
3  
Isn't it the same model for C++ ? –  bltxd Dec 6 '10 at 11:15
1  
Isn't that what it should be? If you choose to override, then it is override. If you choose not, it is not. If you don't specify, just as your example, the compiler gives warnings. –  Dudu Jan 18 '11 at 3:36

Commodore BASIC's command shortcuts. Basically most commands had an abbreviated form which was usually the first letter + (shift+2nd letter). But because the character set on a C64 was by default in all uppercase, these commands would look like bizarre symbols. Here's a short hello world example:

Commodore BASIC screenshot

Maybe someone has a better example actually with more meat to it, but for long programs this looked completely ridiculous.

Here is a list of abbreviations: http://www.c64-wiki.com/index.php/BASIC_keyword_abbreviation

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1  
i also remember that you didn't need to put space after the command, so FORI=1TO15 is valid. Shouldn't take too much imagination to come up with more interesting examples. The one everyone experienced though is that if you put the cursor on the READY. line and hit ENTER, the BASIC parser interprets it the same as READ Y. –  tenfour Aug 14 '10 at 20:58

In Perl (without "use strict" or "use warnings"):

if(true==undef)
{
    print "True\n";
}
else{
    print "False\n";
}
if(undef)
{
    print "True\n";
}
else{
    print "False\n";
}
if(true)
{
    print "True\n";
}
else{
    print "False\n";
}

Prints:

True
False
True
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3  
What's the output? –  xor_eq Aug 19 '10 at 8:21
1  
It prints True False True - implying that the automatic undef -> boolean typecasting behaves differently if it's being compared with the == operator. –  michaelc Aug 23 '10 at 19:03

In Javascript, I believe the following are equivalent:

a['title'] = "Syntactic sugar is good for yr teeth.";
a.title = "Syntactic sugar is good for yr teeth.";
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22  
It is not a WTF, it is very useful (and logical as well). –  Andrey Shchekin Jan 5 '10 at 0:09
2  
Useful maybe, logical hardly imo. –  richo Jan 5 '10 at 1:01
2  
why? because it's not exactly like C or PHP? –  Breton Jan 5 '10 at 22:53
1  
@Richo: Definitely logical. –  slebetman Jan 6 '10 at 2:15
3  
It makes the syntax a bit nicer if you know at design time what data member you're asking for but still allowing dynamic access with the array syntax. –  Michael Mior Mar 12 '10 at 20:39

One unexpected feature was the trailing commas in enum def lists and array initialization lists in C, C#, Ruby, etc.

string[] foods = { "tofu", "grits", "cabbage", }

public enum ArtPeriod {
  Modern,
  Romantic,
  Dada,
}
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15  
I find that extremely cool and useful, not really "strange". –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 4 '10 at 21:07
1  
I agree that it's useful. It was strange to me because it was unexpected and given the years and years of syntax errors in my coding history, I never would've expected those to be valid. –  msp Jan 4 '10 at 21:11
2  
I always use the trailing comma. That way someone can add/remove/comment one more enum value in the middle or end easily. –  Pratik Jan 5 '10 at 2:05
3  
Very useful when generating a list using a script. It removes the need to bother removing the trailing comma. –  3Doubloons Jan 5 '10 at 4:33
4  
Not strange. Strange would be Internet Explorer's insistence for generating errors or outright crashing when it encounters trailing commas (all other javascript interpreters are tolerant towards trailing commas). –  slebetman Jan 6 '10 at 2:18

VBScript's With blocks:

With xml.appendChild(xml.createElement("category"))
  .setAttribute("id",id)
  .setAttribute("keywords",keywords)
  With .appendChild(xml.createElement("item"))
    .setAttribute("count",count)
    .setAttribute("tip",tip)
    .appendChild(xml.createTextNode(text))
  End With
End With
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1  
How is the With block a strange feature? Useful for setting many properties on data classes. –  Josh Smeaton Jan 7 '10 at 10:16
2  
A unique feature is not necessarily strange.... I wish C# and other languages had this feature as well. –  Jeroen Huinink Jan 10 '10 at 18:42

Dozens of things in Javascript can make your eyes water.

The scoping of local variables, as just one simple example:

function foo(obj)
{
  for (var n = 0; n < 10; n++)
  {
    var t;        // Here is a 't'
    ...
  }
  t = "okay";     // And here's the same 't'
}
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12  
@Maltrap: t is defined in an inner block, as delimited by { and }. In pretty much every other modern language, stuff defined inside a block stays inside that block. Likewise I could argue that t is defined in the global/window object and should be accessible globally. JavaScripts behavior is very odd as it applies scope to some {}-Blocks and not to others. –  Michael Stum Jan 5 '10 at 3:20
1  
@Maltrap: I also expect this to work the way it does since my other favourite language also does this. –  slebetman Jan 6 '10 at 1:59
1  
In good Javascript, you should have only one var statement per function, usually at the top of the function. Only functions create a new "scope" in Javascript, and not things like for loops and if statements or {}'s. –  strager Mar 23 '10 at 22:31

MySQL enums, specifically their ability to confuse the living hell out of unprepared coworkers.

CREATE TABLE foo (
    ....
    dispatched ENUM('0','1') NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
)

Then:

UPDATE TABLE foo SET ..., dispatched = 1;

Oops, dispatched was set to ZERO instead, because the 1 wasn't quoted. This really annoyed someone who worked on my code; I use plain old INTs now.

On a related note, even if you add an empty string option to your enum, e.g.

blah ENUM('','A','B') NOT NULL,

If you assign an invalid value to blah, MySQL will use a secret hidden empty string value to represent the invalid value, which will be difficult to distinguish from the one you added yourself. Yay!

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1  
How about TINYINT(1), BIT or (perhaps best of all) BOOLEAN rather than ENUM('0','1')? –  outis Jan 5 '10 at 14:58

in X++ (Microsoft Dynamics AX):

1) the need of a semi-colon (;) on a separate line to separate variable declaration from statements (at least up to version 4.0)

    int i;
    int myArray[5];
    ;
    i = 1;


2) array indexes are 1-based, so you are not allowed to read from an array using index 0 (zero) like in

    int myArray[5];
    ;
    print myArray[0];    // runtime error

this is not strange, but you are allowed to use the zero index on the left hand side of an assigment, like in

    int myArray[5];
    ;
    myArray[2] = 102;
    myArray[0] = 100;    // this is strange
    print myArray[2];    // expcting 102?

what happens? The array gets initialized to it's default value, no matter what value was used in the assignment. The above code outputs 0 (zero)!

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1  
Thats a terrific way to trip up people... –  Yann Ramin Jan 8 '10 at 7:52

In c#

Math.Round(2.5)==2
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8  
That's called "banker's rounding" and is pretty much standard and expected. You can always use Math.Round() method overload with additional parameter to specify other ways of rounding. –  Dejan Stanič Jan 5 '10 at 23:18
9  
"Standard and expected" depends on audience. Programmers are rarely bankers, but good to point out what is happening. –  Roger Pate Jan 6 '10 at 1:38
4  
It's called "banker's rounding", but it's not just for bankers. If you've ever done any statistics (or banking for that matter) you know how useful this form of rounding can be. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 6 '10 at 21:31

In MATLAB (interactive array-oriented language, currently TIOBE 20) there is a keyword end to denote the last element of array (it corresponds to NumPy -1). So this is a well known MATLAB syntax:

myVar = myArray(end)

To get an element from the middle of array one would usually write:

myVar = myArray( ceil( length(myArray)/2 ) )

Surprisingly the keyword end is not a keyword at all but is a kind of variable:

myVar = myArray( ceil( end/2 ) )
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Variable assignment in JavaScript can create global variables. If a variable is a assigned a value within a function and it is not declared as var in the same scope it is implicitly declared global.

function foo() {
  x = "juhu";  // creates a global variable x!
  var y = "kinners"
}

foo();
alert(x); // alerts "juhu"
alert(y); // alerts undefined

Note that the var statement can also be used after a value has been assigned to the variable:

function foo() {
  x = 12;
  var x; // x is now local
  return x;
}

alert(foo()); // will alert 12;
alert(x); // will alert undefined
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In Matlab, the following may be surprising, especially if you are used to Python:

>> not true

ans =

     0     0     0     0
>> not false

ans =

     0     0     0     0     0

There are two weird features here. The first one is that a b is interpreted as a('b'), so not true is interpreted as not('true'). The second weird feature is that not of any character returns 0 (presumably because there is no false or true in matlab, only 0 or 1).

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Atari BASIC:

You can fill a string with a character without writing a loop:

10 DIM A$(100)
20 A$(1)=" ":A$(100)=" ":A$(2)=A$
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2  
@pedrofurla: I'm pretty sure he's saying that after those three assignments, A$(3) through A$(99) will now contain spaces as well. I bet the underlying string implementation looks scary. –  Jander Oct 27 '10 at 6:24

NSIS (the Nullsoft Scriptable Install System) has the StrCmp instruction:

StrCmp str1 str2 jump_if_equal [jump_if_not_equal]

Compares (case insensitively) str1 to str2. If str1 and str2 are equal, Gotos jump_if_equal, otherwise Gotos jump_if_not_equal.

StrCmp $0 "a string" 0 +3
 DetailPrint '$$0 == "a string"'
 Goto +2
 DetailPrint '$$0 != "a string"'

The icing on the cake: jump_if_equal and jump_if_not_equal can be negative, too. But I guess you already figured that out from the + symbol in front of positive numbers. I don't remember whether it's mandatory, or just a horrible convention.

This basically combines the worst of BASIC and the worst of Assembler.

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In Java,

String s = null;
System.out.println(s + "hello");

This outputs "nullhello".

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1  
@jdk: NullReferenceException is C#'s thing. This is because all the + operations are automatically compiled to StringBuilder flows so that a+b+c (where all variables are Strings) becomes new StringBuilder().append(a).append(b).append(c).toString() and as we can see from StringBuilder.append(Object o)'s javadoc, nulls are handled by printing null instead of throwing an exception. Tl;dr: Compiler magic with syntactic sugar. –  Esko Aug 13 '10 at 18:00

Python 2.x demonstrates a poor list comprehension realization:

z = 4
s = [z*z for z in range(255)]
print z

This code returns 254. The list comprehension's variable collides with an upper defined.

Python 3.x had disposed of this feature, but closures are still using dynamic linking for external variables and brings many WTFs in the functional style python programmer

def mapper(x):
    return x*x
continuations = [lambda: mapper(x) for x in range(5)]
print( [c() for c in continuations])

This code returns obviously [16,16,16,16,16].

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The following is similar to this answer which is about arrays.

In Powershell, like other dynamic languages, strings and numbers are somewhat interchangeable. However, Powershell can't make up its mind.

PS> $a = "4"    # string
PS> $a * 3      # Python can do this, too
444
PS> 3 * $a      # Python doesn't do it this way, string repetition is commutative
12
PS> $a + 3      # Python gives a mismatched types error
43
PS> 3 + $a      # Python would give an error here, too
7

If the variable is an integer instead of a string, then the operations are commutative.

PS> $a = 4      # integer
PS> $a * 3
12
PS> 3 * $a
12
PS> $a + 3
7
PS> 3 + $a
7

When in doubt, do a cast:

PS> $a = "4"
PS> $b = 3
PS> [int] $a * [int] $b
12

You could also use [float].

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4  
Let's see, Powershell has a well-defined and reasonable policy for mixing integers and strings with the * and + operators: the left operand defines the type of the operation. It happens to differ from Python. Note that there is no "official" requirement for string repetition being commutative, unlike there is for numeric addition. Then, numeric operations work as expected. If you cast everything to a single type, everything works as expected too. So, what's strange? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 20 '10 at 4:02

Not sure whether someone mentioned it.

In Java, in finally block it can return a value. It will stop the propagation of an exception and override the normal return statement.

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In Visual Basic 7 and above I found the implementation of short-circuit logical evaluation to maintain compatibility with legacy Visual Basic <=6 code a bit of a WTF:

AndAlso (MSDN)
OrElse (MSDN)

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Another vote for JavaScript:

parseInt('08') == 0

because anything with a leading 0 is interpreted as octal (weird), and invalid octal numbers evaluate to zero (BAD). I discovered this one August when code I hadn't touched in months broke on its own. It would have fixed itself in October, as it turns out.

Octal support has apparently been deprecated, so future generations of JavaScripters will not have this rite of passage.

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6  
This is a dupe, please delete and improve the other answer. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 7 '10 at 2:52

In Perl, objects are just blessed refs, so changing the class of an object at run time is a piece of cake:

package Foo;
sub new { bless {}, $_[0] }
package Bar;
package main;
my $foo = Foo->new;
ref($foo); # => "Foo"
bless $foo, 'Bar';
ref($foo); # => "Bar"

I was surprised that other languages can't do this. What a useful feature!

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2  
My C++ is rusty but I don't think what you've described would have changed the class of the object itself; just of this particular pointer to the object. –  Max A. Jan 7 '10 at 12:53
2  
In Python you don't have to do bother doing this. Who cares what class an object is? haha –  Michael Mior Mar 15 '10 at 13:55
1  
None of what you guys commented is really equivalent to the perl thing, which is leaving the object entirely intact but changing the class of it. –  ben Sep 6 '10 at 18:15

In Python:

abs((10+5j)-(25+-5j))

Returns ~18.03, which is the distance between the points (10,5) and (25,5) by the Pythagoras theorem. This fact happens because Python has native language support to complex numbers in the form of 2+2j for example. Since the absolute value of a complex number in form of a+bj = sqrt(a^2+b^2), we get the distance while subtracting one complex number from another and then apply the abs (absolute) function over it.

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4  
What is so strange about this? How else would you calculate the absolute value of complex numbers? –  Debilski Jan 7 '10 at 16:26
3  
The strange is, as I cited, the native language support to complex numbers, which brings some strange syntax constructions. –  Tarantula Jan 7 '10 at 16:57

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