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I know how to program Console application with parameters, example : myProgram.exe param1 param2.

My question is, how can I make my program works with |, example : echo "word" | myProgram.exe?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You need to use Console.Read() and Console.ReadLine() as if you were reading user input. Pipes replace user input transparently. You can't use both easily (although I'm sure it's quite possible...).

Edit:

A simple cat style program:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string s;
        while ((s = Console.ReadLine()) != null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(s);
        }

    }
}

And when run, as expected, the output:

C:\...\ConsoleApplication1\bin\Debug>echo "Foo bar baz" | ConsoleApplication1.exe
"Foo bar baz"

C:\...\ConsoleApplication1\bin\Debug>
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Does your example works for : echo "Foo bar baz" | ConsoleApplication1.exe | ConsoleApplication1.exe ? –  Patrick Desjardins Oct 14 '08 at 0:41
2  
Yes. Using a lower level analogy, what really happens with a pipe is the Stdout stream of the first application gets plugged into the Stdin stream of the next application in the pipeline. The console's stdin get put through the first application, and the last applications stdout is displayed. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 14 '08 at 0:44
    
Tommorow I will try that!!! Thx :) –  Patrick Desjardins Oct 14 '08 at 0:48
1  
If you're working with binary data: stackoverflow.com/questions/1562417/… –  sanmai Oct 3 '12 at 1:58

The following will not suspend the application for input and works when data is or is not piped. A bit of a hack; and due to the error catching, performance could lack when numerous piped calls are made but... easy.

public static void Main(String[] args)
{

    String pipedText = "";
    bool isKeyAvailable;

    try
    {
        isKeyAvailable = System.Console.KeyAvailable;
    }
    catch (InvalidOperationException expected)
    {
        pipedText = System.Console.In.ReadToEnd();
    }

    //do something with pipedText or the args
}
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Great trick, thanks for this! –  Tao Jan 22 '12 at 20:22

Console.In is a reference to a TextReader wrapped around the standard input stream. When piping large amounts of data to your program, it might be easier to work with that way.

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Here is another alternate solution that was put together from the other solutions plus a peek().

Without the Peek() I was experiencing that the app would not return without ctrl-c at the end when doing "type t.txt | prog.exe" where t.txt is a multi-line file. But just "prog.exe" or "echo hi | prog.exe" worked fine.

this code is meant to only process piped input.

static int Main(string[] args)
{
    // if nothing is being piped in, then exit
    if (!IsPipedInput())
        return 0;

    while (Console.In.Peek() != -1)
    {
        string input = Console.In.ReadLine();
        Console.WriteLine(input);
    }

    return 0;
}

private static bool IsPipedInput()
{
    try
    {
        bool isKey = Console.KeyAvailable;
        return false;
    }
    catch
    {
        return true;
    }
}
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This is the way to do it:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.SetIn(new StreamReader(Console.OpenStandardInput(8192))); // This will allow input >256 chars
    while (Console.In.Peek() != -1)
    {
        string input = Console.In.ReadLine();
        Console.WriteLine("Data read was " + input);
    }
}

This allows two usage methods. Read from standard input:

C:\test>myProgram.exe
hello
Data read was hello

or read from piped input:

C:\test>echo hello | myProgram.exe
Data read was hello
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Here is something I have found with Google : Interprocess Communication but it requires kernell32.dll call... does it has an other way to do it? It's a simple task ...

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1  
IPC has nothing to do with pipes (not this sort anyway). Named pipes are something completely different again. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 14 '08 at 0:46
    
ahhh didn't know! –  Patrick Desjardins Oct 14 '08 at 0:48
    
Named pipes are used to setup communication between two programs who expect to communicate to each other (similar to an internal network afaik). Pipes in this sense are user defined communication channels, and the programs involved generally aren't even aware of the fact. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 14 '08 at 0:57
    
Is it you that vote me down??? No need to go under 0 if it's not THE solution... –  Patrick Desjardins Oct 14 '08 at 22:34
    
@Matthew: Pipes are most definitely a form of interprocess communication. Shell pipes use kernel32 anonymous pipes, which work almost exactly the same way as named pipes in stream mode. The shell even could use a named pipe for this if it wanted to, and your program would never even know the difference. I'm not sure, but it's possible that anonymous pipes under the hood actually are named pipes with a random name. –  Ben Voigt Nov 2 '10 at 1:25

there is a problem with supplied example.

  while ((s = Console.ReadLine()) != null)

will stuck waiting for input if program was launched without piped data. so user has to manually press any key to exit program.

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