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"As written, getint treats a + or - not followed by a digit as a valid representation of zero. Fix it to push such a character back on the input."

Ok, well this is the original version:

int getint2(int *pn)
{
    int c, sign;

    while(isspace(c=getch()))
         ;

    if(!isdigit(c) && c!= EOF && c!= '+' && c!= '-') {
          ungetch(c);
          return 0;
    }

    sign = (c == '-') ? -1 : 1;

    if(c == '+' || c == '-') {
       c = getch();
    }

    for(*pn = 0; isdigit(c); c = getch())
        *pn = 10 * *pn + (c - '0');

    *pn *= sign;
    ungetch(c);
    return c;
}

And i edited this way:

int getint2(int *pn)
{
    int c, sign;

    while(isspace(c=getch()))
         ;

    if(!isdigit(c) && c!= EOF && c!= '+' && c!= '-') {
          ungetch(c);
          return 0;
    }

    sign = (c == '-') ? -1 : 1;

    if(c == '+' || c == '-') {
       c = getch();

       if(!isdigit(c)) {
         ungetch(c);
         return 0;
       }
    }

    for(*pn = 0; isdigit(c); c = getch())
        *pn = 10 * *pn + (c - '0');

    *pn *= sign;
    ungetch(c);
    return c;
}

So im not sure what did the author want. Should i unget the +/- aswell, or just the character after it? Should i return 0 in case there's no digits after +/- or -1?

I also have a question about getch and ungetch functions: since EOF on my sistem is -1, this is how i wrote getch and ungetch:

int buf = EOF;

int getch()
{
    int temp;

    if(buf == -2)
        return EOF;

    if(buf == EOF) 
        temp = getchar();
    else
    {
        temp = buf;
        buf = EOF;
    }

    return temp;
}

void ungetch(int c)
{
     if(c == EOF) 
        buf = -2;

     buf = c;
}

So i was told by some people that EOF can be -2. What should i do to avoid this sort of 'problem'.

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1  
Just so we know, is this a homework problem? If so, you've asked it the right way, by posting the work you've already done and asking specific questions, but it's also good to mention that it's homework so people can keep that in mind while answering. –  Brian Campbell Jan 3 '10 at 15:36
    
If you're only providing one char of "put back" buffer you may as well use getchar and ungetc directly instead of rolling your own getch/ungetch pair. I think that your changes will need more than one character of "un-get" though, your implementation may provide this. –  Charles Bailey Jan 3 '10 at 15:41
    
No, its an exercise from K&R, but i guess ill mention it from now on. –  Tool Jan 3 '10 at 16:01
    
Yeah, well im using getch and ungetch because the book implied so. No, i dont need more then one char of unget, because the function always returns after ungeting a char. –  Tool Jan 3 '10 at 16:04
    
It depends on what you read into "push such a character". If it means the '+' or '-' then you have to look at the character following it, determine that it is a non-digit and then push the non-digit and the '+' or '-' back into the read buffer. If it means just the non-digit (probably what was intended), then yes, only one character of "un-get" is required. –  Charles Bailey Jan 3 '10 at 16:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To answer your second question, about EOF and -2, I can think of a couple of solutions:

  • you could have an array of characters in the "buffer", and an "index" in the position (i.e., have a rudimentary stack). I believe that arrays are introduced in K&R by that point. That will give you flexibility in that you can ungetch() more than one character. An added advantage of this scheme is that your code in part 1, where you might need to ungetch() twice, becomes easier as well.
  • you could store the 'state' in another int variable, such as int buffered = 0;, and then getch() would return buf only when buffered == 1. ungetch() sets buffered = 1, getch() sets buffered = 0:
static int buf;
static int buffered = 0;

int getch()
{
    if (buffered) {
        buffered = 0;
        return buf;
    }
    return getchar();
}

void ungetch(int c)
{
    buffered = 1;
    buf = c;
}
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