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I have some list items to which I need to show lines between the list elements but not on the first and last elements.

According to many posts here on SO, this can be done using

1st approach

.list-item { 
    border-top: 1px solid black;
}

.list-item:first-child{
    border: none;
}

But I just realized on my own that it can be done like this too

2nd approach

.list-item ~ .list-item {
    border-top: 1px solid black;
}

I was implementing the second approach in my office project but my colleagues prohibited me to use it.

I was using it as it is simple, does the same and it is also passes browser compatibility. Then why should not I use the second approach? (I am asking here because I can't find this approach on SO)

My colleagues stating that it results in bugs later in the project. So, my question is, are there really issues related to "sibling selector" of CSS ?

share|improve this question
    
my post doesn't make much sense, but I just want to know whether second approach is better or worse? –  Mr_Green Nov 13 '13 at 11:45
    
Browser Support Adjacent-sibling selectors are supported in Internet Explorer 5.x Macintosh. They are also supported in the Netscape 6 preview release 1 for all the myriad platforms for which it's available, and in preview release 3 of Opera 4 for Windows. There are bugs in the handling of adjacent-sibling selectors in IE5 for Windows, and Opera 3 for Windows. –  john Smith Nov 13 '13 at 11:50
2  
@johnSmith This is not adjacent sibling selector. It is just sibling selector. –  Mr_Green Nov 13 '13 at 12:28
    
@Mr_Green Before discussing your CSS question, please post the relevant part of your HTML markup. Because CSS code without the associated HTML code is senseless. –  Netsurfer Nov 17 '13 at 10:59
    
@Netsurfer updated my post.. –  Mr_Green Nov 17 '13 at 15:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This May Be What They Mean by "Bugs"

Before discussing the possible "bugs," I want to note that I disagree with nmkol's answer in that :first-child is perfectly fine in your case. His example showing a potential issue is invalid html, as the only valid child of a ul is an li, so there should never be any other "type" of child that is a sibling to an li.

Now regarding "bugs."

First

The first code gives your lines as you desire, and also allows later css (perhaps other css in the project made by your co-workers) to override it like so:

.list-item {
   border: none;
}

However, the above override would not work if you use the second code, because the override is not specific enough to overcome the specificity of the original selector code. So this could be perceived as a "bug," as it would require some way of increasing the specificity to override it, of which there may not be an "elegant" way to do it, but only through some "redundant" increase like this (redundant because :nth-child(n) matches all elements):

.list-item:nth-child(n) {
    border: none;
}

Or this redundancy (which just states the class twice):

.list-item.list-item {
    border: none;
}

However, there are other means of increasing specificity that may not be as redundant, but it may be your colleagues do not desire to have to increase specificity.

Second

Both versions have some "bugginess" with older browsers, just differently. So it may depend on what browser support is desired that your colleagues may consider :first-child pseudo-class to be less buggy than the general sibling selector ~.

Personally, I would ask them to be more specific about what "bug" your second code introduces. This will help you establish more clearly what they perceive the problem to be (which may be some "third" idea I do not give here).

Better Still?

Since your intended support is IE9+, then this selector is probably your best solution:

.list-item:not(:first-child) { 
    border-top: 1px solid black;
}

I say "best" because:

  1. It keeps it as a single (non-cascade) selector
  2. It keeps it as a selector that is only evaluating the item in question (in other words, the browser does not need to check any previous elements for their status, which is the case for the general sibling combinator of .list-item ~ .list-item), and so improves performance.
  3. It is a bit clearer what is being done, that is, select the .list-item unless it is the first one. It is not immediately obvious that .list-item ~ .list-item also skips the first item and only the first item (though when one thinks about it, he/she will come to that conclusion).

If these are not used on li elements (say, a "list" of div elements), then it is possible that :first-child may need to be replaced with :first-of-type (which is assuming then that no other non-"list-item" elements are of the same type; really this idea is designed for use with li elements).

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We are here supporting IE9+.. Can you give your opinion on with what approach should I go with? (the two appraches which I mentioned above) –  Mr_Green Nov 16 '13 at 15:36
    
and I am the only one who is working on CSS.. they are just testing my code later. –  Mr_Green Nov 16 '13 at 15:44
    
Well, my opinion is somewhat irrelevant. Either works. The first might even be slightly "faster" in selecting (though not enough to really make it a factor). I'll repeat that really you need to communicate with your co-workers to find out what "bug" they are seeing. If you are in control of the css, then perhaps you can use the one you want, #2, and overcome the "bug" through other changes in css. But unless you find out the exact issue, that may not be possible. On the other hand, if it means little to you, then just do what your co-workers want and go with #1 to keep the peace. –  ScottS Nov 16 '13 at 16:41
    
Thanks for your opinion.. actually I asked here thinking that the second approach hasn't been used by anyone (I realized this on my own), just shared here, so that others can knew about it. –  Mr_Green Nov 16 '13 at 17:04
    
@Mr_Green: I updated with another (perhaps better) means of doing what you want if just targeting IE9+. –  ScottS Nov 21 '13 at 14:49

Am not going big and detailed like other answers, cuz I feel it's not required actually to elaborate this...

tl;dr

We are here supporting IE9+.. Can you give your opinion on with what approach should I go with? (the two appraches which I mentioned above) (Here)

Answer is there's no issue if you use ~ or you use first-child whatsoever, as both are totally compatible..

What's the only catch here is, if you have some other properties inside the ~ like this, than it might cause an issue for you, where as if you use first-child than it won't, check this out...


My colleagues stating that it results in bugs later in the project. - First please ask them what kind of bugs do general sibling selector really produce.

So, my question is, are there really issues related to "sibling selector" of CSS ? - Answer is NO

As far as the compatibility goes, you can refer the table below..

enter image description here


So, now I've already shared you the compatibility table, it's absolutely no issue if you use general sibling selector ~, still if your colleagues are redundant to use it.. I will provide you few alternate solutions..

Solution 1 - Vintage

Using class on the first child of li element

ul li {
    border-top: 1px solid #eee;
}

ul li.first {
    border-top: 0;
}

Demo


Solution 2 - Use first-child[1](You already have this)

ul li {

    border-top: 1px solid #eee;
}

ul li:first-child {
    border-top: 0;
}

Demo 2

1. Compatibility


Last but no the least you can also use first-of-type instead of first-child but again, compatibility will be an issue here, as first-child is much more compatible compared to first-of-type, or you can use last-of-type and last-child but again, compatibility will cause an issue, also, instead of using border-top you will have to use border-bottom: 0; if you are going for last-child or last-of-type

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1) Since you have mentioned that you are targeting IE9+ - browser support is irrelevant here because both approaches are supported.

2) Although approach #2 appears to be more succinct in that you have succeeded to place the top border on all but the first element in one rule and without overriding the border -

i) Overriding rules in these situations seem to be a better idea because they clearly show what the code is doing

and

ii) If the list items need further styling apart from border-top (which is very often the case) - then you'll need an extra rule anyway in approach#2 to target styles for all the list items.

So I would stick to approach #1 for the slight advantage of code clarity over approach #2.

share|improve this answer
    
ya you are right.. –  Mr_Green Nov 22 '13 at 5:14

As already stated in the other two answers I cannot see why your approach should be "buggy". But there are some other issues with your general concept.

I assume that your markup look something like this:

<ul>
   <li class="list-item">...</li>
   <li class="list-item">...</li>
   <li class="list-item">...</li>
   <li class="list-item">...</li>
</ul>

where it does not matter if it's an ordered or unordered list.

So the first point regarding your approach is the use of the class attribute. If you only have three or four list items then maybe it does not matter, but think about how ineffective this is if you have a hundred or more elements.

Therefor using a class attribute on every list item should be generally avoided in preference to using it on the parent element.

<ul class="my-list">
   <li>...</li>
   <li>...</li>
   <li>...</li>
   <li>...</li>
</ul>

Secondly class and id names should always be related to the content of the respective elements, not to their presentation, as their presentation may change!
(So "my-list" is not a good choice and should be replaced with a content related name. Or it even might be better to use an ID instead of a class attribute.)

You also wrote:

... but not on the first and last elements.

I cannot see how you would achieve this with your approaches, neither with the first nor with the second one, as you only match the first li element with both of them.

There will be another solution (depending on the needed browser support) to not match the first element:

.my-list li:not(:first-child) {
   border-top: 1px solid black;
}

And if you also want to exclude the last element:

.my-list li:not(:first-child):not(:last-child) {
   border-top: 1px solid black;
}

In case it is a nested list you may use the child selector like this:

.my-list > li:not(:first-child):not(:last-child) {
   border-top: 1px solid black;
}

As always, there are many different ways to achieve the same thing with CSS. Which one might be the best depends on the individual circumstances of the respective project. In general, keeping the KISS principle in mind isn't a bad idea! ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
.my-list li:not(:first-child), .my-list li:not(:last-child) { border-top: 1px solid black; } This will not work - the first selector will match all the list items (including the last) with the exception of the first but the first item will be matched by the second selector so all items will be matched - JSFIDDLE –  MT0 Nov 22 '13 at 0:32
    
If you want to exclude both the first and the last list items then you need to use: .my-list li:not(:first-child):not(:last-child) { border-top: 1px solid black; } JSFIDDLE –  MT0 Nov 22 '13 at 0:34
    
@MT0 Of course you are right - corrected! Thanks for the hint. –  Netsurfer Nov 22 '13 at 9:59

Well i'm not sure why your selector can result in a bug later on.

What i do know is that your selectors aren't exactly the same.

First of all the :first-child selector will select the first element. Specify it with the element <li> it will only be selected when it is the first element.

As you can see Here the first selector won't work.

However the :first-of-type is the same selector as your second selector. However this doesn't work with classes!

Myself would choose your selector as it is more specific what you want. If you would use :first-of-type i would still use your selector because it is more 'smart' coded and you don't need any overlay code to disable the border. Also you can combine your selector with classes.

I suggest you ask your colleagues why they would say that, because i would not see any scenarios of this being a problem.


There is a bug however for older browsers where a dynamic psuedo-class will not work combined with a general sibling or adjacent sibling selector.

bug: https://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=32695

This seems to be fixed in later versions.

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2  
I think it is safe to assume that OP does not have <p> tags within the <ul>, as that is not valid HTML. –  andi Nov 19 '13 at 15:21
    
You're right. So actually all the selectos would have worked in OPs case. However the selectors are still not the same, that was more my point. –  nkmol Nov 19 '13 at 18:18

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