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I am developing a bean class which has multi face properties (name has first name, last name and middle name). Please compare my two methods to incorporate the same in my application.

Method 1:

public class SampleVO {
String firstName;
String middleName;
String lastName;
// getters and setters
}

Method 2:

//Main object
public class SampleVO1 {
NameVO name = new NameVO();
// getters and setters
}
//Name object
public class NameVO {
    String firstName;
    String middleName;
    String lastName;
    // getters and setters
}

Note: Above is just a sample. The requirement is to group a set of properties. In Which way of the above performance/code standards will be good?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by RC., Donaudampfschifffreizeitfahrt, Werner Henze, timrau, Alexis Pigeon Nov 13 '13 at 14:52

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
This question belongs on codereview.stackexchange.com. –  Werner Henze Nov 13 '13 at 14:29
    
Guide me how to migrate this question to codereview portal? –  Jeyasithar Nov 18 '13 at 9:27
    
I think you can't migrate it there, you will have to ask the same question (copy-paste) there again. –  Werner Henze Nov 18 '13 at 10:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It really depends on your use case. If you need NameVO somewhere else or it makes more sense to you to encapsulate the firstName, middleName and lastName in a separate Object then go for the second solution. If that makes no sense for you, take the first one.

There should not be any performance issues for both solutions. If you want to use the second solution you can provide getter and setter for the properties of the NameVO in the SampleVO1. So something like this:

public class SampleVO1 {
    protected NameVO nameVo = new NameVO();

    public String getFirstName() {
        return nameVo.getFirstName();
    }

    public void setFirstName(String firstName) {
        this.nameVo.setFirstName(firstName);
    }

    // etc.
}
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The main intention is that the class has lot of properties, I want it to be a package of files. Should I add getter setter of nameVo here in SampleVO1? Please advice. –  Jeyasithar Nov 13 '13 at 12:30
    
If you want to group the properties in another bean (e.g. NameVO), but you want to use these properties only via getters and setters in the SampleVO1 I would add getters and setters in the SampleVO1 that only forward the requests to the NameVO. This is beacuse then you don't need to access the actual object (like: sampleVO1.getName().getFirstName()), but you can directly access e.g. the firstName. If you need the NameVO outside of the SampleVO1, too, you can provide an additional getter and setter for the NameVO, too. –  mvieghofer Nov 13 '13 at 12:36
    
I've just edited my answer and initialised the nameVo (so that you don't get a NullPointerException when accessing the nameVo) –  mvieghofer Nov 13 '13 at 12:37

Firstly, make sure they're private/protected. They shouldn't be directly accessible outside their own class:

public class NameVO {
  protected String firstName;
  protected String middleName;
  protected String lastName;
// getters and setters
}

Method 2 would be advisable assuming SampleVO1 will do more than just initialise the class.

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A single level of indirection is usually not important. The delay you see is usually one memory access i.e. 4 - 200 clock cycles. Typically less than 10 nano-seconds for optimised code.

Note: there is two level of indirection in every String object. If indirection was killing your performance you wouldn't only be using primitives, or off heap memory, not String at all.

In short, the cost is fraction of the cost of using just one String.

When considering performance questions, you should start with the simplest and clearest implementation possible and only when you have measured a performance problem should you alter the code for performance reason, AND you should test your changes because often your "improvement" will be worse, or no better, just more complicated.

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