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I'm trying to check whether one of my process is running or not in every 10 minutes and if not, restart that process. I want this script to start automatically when the system boots up, so I go for services in linux.

So here is what I did:

  • Wrote a bash script as a service.
  • In the start method of shell script, in an infinite while loop, check whether a temp file exists, if available do my logic, else break the loop.
  • In the stop method, delete the temp file.
  • Then i used update-rc.d to add this script to system boot up.

Everything was working fine, except one thing. If i do ./myservice start, then the terminal hangs up(it should as its running infinite loop), but if I do a ctrl-z then the script was killed and my task wont perform. So my question is how can i make this script to start from the terminal and execute normally. (like say ./etc/init.d/mysql start), may be do the process in background and return. Any ideas?

My bash script given below:

#!/bin/bash

# Start the service 
start() {

    #Process name that need to be monitored
    process_name="mysqld"        

    #Restart command for process
    restart_process_command="service mysql start"

    #path to pgrep command
    PGREP="/usr/bin/pgrep"

    #Initially, on startup do create a testfile to indicate that the process
    #need to be monitored. If you dont want the process to be monitored, then 
    #delete this file or stop this service        
        touch /tmp/testfile

        while true;
        do

        if [ ! -f /tmp/testfile ]; then
             break
        fi      

        $PGREP ${process_name}

        if [ $? -ne 0 ] # if <process> not running
        then
        # restart <process>
        $restart_process_command
        fi

        #Change the time for monitoring process here (in secs)
        sleep 1000

    done
}

stop() {
       echo "Stopping the service"
       rm -rf /tmp/testfile
}
### main logic ###
case "$1" in
  start)
        start
        ;;
  stop)
        stop
        ;;
  status)
        ;;
  restart|reload|condrestart)
        stop
        start
        ;;
  *)
        echo $"Usage: $0 {start|stop|restart|reload|status}"
        exit 1
esac
exit 0
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1  
The script isn't killed, it's just suspended. Typing bg would resume it in the background. –  chepner Nov 13 '13 at 12:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Execute the function in the background. Say:

start)
      start &

instead of saying:

start)
      start
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On doing this, it doesn't exit. Even if I do ctrl-z, the echo was still coming after 10 sec. –  HRM Nov 13 '13 at 12:55
    
@HRM The function was executed in the background. You'd need to kill the shell process that started this function. –  devnull Nov 13 '13 at 12:57
    
i'm not that much expert in linux.After editing script with ur suggestion,from a terminal window, ./myservice start..it just running infinitely..what I want is to execute this in background and release that terminal. Its not happening. Am i clear? –  HRM Nov 13 '13 at 13:04
    
@HRM If it's holding up the terminal, that might be due to mysql service start. Put that command in the background as well. mysql service start & –  devnull Nov 13 '13 at 13:14
1  
@HRM: Check if start >/dev/null 2>&1 & instead of start & in above answer works for you. I'm guessing that you want the service to be completely detached from the terminal... –  anishsane Nov 13 '13 at 13:18

You should detach the cycle itself to a separated script and run the latter script from the startup one according to the manner preferred in your distribution for a non-self-daemonizing application.

Please notice that your current startup script will likely hang a system boot up even if not run from terminal, at least for most traditional startups (I won't say for systemd and other contemporary ones which could start multiple scripts in parallel, but they definitely will think startup isn't finished). But you could miss it if e.g. logged in via ssh because sshd will start before your script.

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But i have tried rebooting and the script was working. So you mean, there is no way to accomplish my task using a single script. –  HRM Nov 13 '13 at 12:52
    
@HRM practically this could be a code in the same script file, e.g. function or even a statement sequence in parentheses; adding "&" after them starts the chunk in background. –  Netch Dec 23 '13 at 6:00

In my opinion, it's worth scheduling such kind of script with cron scheduler rather than writing standalone init script.

cat > /usr/local/bin/watch-mysql.sh <<-"__SEOF__"
    #!/bin/sh
    set -e

    # if this file exists monitoring is stopped
    if [ -f /var/run/dont-watch-mysql.lck ]; then
      exit 0
    fi

    process_name="mysqld"        
    restart_process_command="service mysql restart"
    PGREP="/usr/bin/pgrep"

    $PGREP ${process_name}

    if [ $? -ne 0 ] # if <process> not running
    then
        # restart <process>
        $restart_process_command
    fi
__SEOF__

# make the script executable
chmod u+x /usr/local/bin/watch-mysql.sh

# schedule the script to run every 10 minutes
(crontab -l ; echo "*/10 * * * * /usr/local/bin/watch-mysql.sh") | uniq - | crontab -

If you simply create the file /var/run/watch-mysql.lck it won't be monitored.

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