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In my interface package i have this following piece of code that runs when the user wants to change some info about a artist:

IArtist artistToChange = ContainerHelper.Container.GetExportedValue<IArtist>();
artistToChange.Load(new Guid("provided guid"));
artistToChange.SomeProperty = newValue;
artistToChange.Update();

Being Artist a entity in my domain it is composed among other stuff by a IUser CreatedBy & IUser LastAlteredBy properties that must be loaded (think of Many-To-One relationship). Each Entity also has its own repository. IArtist has a IArtistRepository the same way IUser has IUserRepository.

My problem is the following: How can I get a instance of a concrete implementation of IUser inside of IArtist.Load() while maintaining IoC (without the concrete implementation of IArtist not knowing about the concrete implementation of IUser)?

(To make things easy let's call of CArtist the concrete implementation of IArtist, and CUser the implementation of IUser.)

With that in mind i though about passing the container to the Entities so they could also request parts, but i dont know if that is a good idea or even a anti-pattern, mainly because im using constructor injection and my constructor for 'CArtist' looks like this:

[ImportingConstructor]
public CArtist(IArtistRepository repository)
{
    this.repository = repository;
}

but i cant get the container to inject itself with something like

[ImportingConstructor]
public CArtist(IArtistRepository repository, CompositionContainer container)
{
    this.container = container    
    this.repository = repository;
}

So this is basically it... i'm quite lost here... this turned out to be a cry for help/guidance more than a question on itself...

PS: If any other information is necessary pls ask for it!

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How do you intend to use the container in the CArtist class? Will the container give you more flexibility than properties decorated with ImportAttribute? –  Panos Rontogiannis Nov 14 '13 at 15:01
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1 Answer

Assuming you properly export a concrete IArtist class, you can do the following in your code, and then as long as the dll's are available, when you compose the CArtist class, the IArtist type would get injected into the class. You may be able to even get away with a private variable private IArtist _someArtist; (marked with the import attribute)

public class CArtist : IArtist
{
    [ImportingConstructor]
    public CArtist(IArtistRepository repository)
    {
        this.repository = repository;
    }

    public void Load(Guid guid)
    {
        this.SomeArtist.DoSomething(guid);
        ...
    }

    [Import(typeof(IArtist))]
    private IArtist SomeArtist { get; set; }
}

Another approach, would be to, again use a property or var in the class, and import it in the constructor

private IArtist _artist;

[ImportingConstructor]
public CArtist(IArtistRepository repository, IArtist artist)
{
    this.repository = repository;
    this._artist = artist;
}

Aside from those possible approaches, imho passing the container wouldn't be too big of a problem, it would work and you still maintain the separation, I've seen that done in a few places, but I'm no expert in IoC to know definitively whether it's a good or bad practice.

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interesting... so far i placed the container in the Library (project the only has the interfaces and enumerators) because all projects reference it... I created a helper class that would return the container as a singleton... i think this is a good approach... what do you think? –  Leonardo Nov 14 '13 at 1:17
    
@Leonardo it would work, like the saying goes, there is more than one way to skin a cat (note to everyone, no cat was actually harmed in this idiomatic expression). Though I personally wouldn't take this approach, imho the client(s) should take care of composing whatever is needed, and not the shared lib where the interfaces and enums are :) –  Jason Nov 14 '13 at 17:59
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