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I have been using NHibernate on a system for sometime and I am quite happy with how it works, but I thought I would have a go at switching NHibernate out and putting in Entity Framework purely for a learning exercise. However there is a problem I have come across though, in my domain I have 2 classes (somewhat simplified for examples)

public class Post
{
    public Post()
    {
        Comments = new List<Comment>();
    }

    public virtual int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual string Title { get; set; }
    public virtual string Text { get; set; }
    public virtual DateTime DatePosted { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Comment> Comments { get; set; }
}

public class Comment
{
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual string CommentText { get; set; }
    public virtual Post Post { get; set; }
}

The mappings for this work fine when I am using NHibernate, I can quite happily traverse between my Post Comment one to many relationship, Comments are lazy loaded as expected and all is good.

But when moving to EntityFramework it seems in order for the relationship to work, I need to change my Comment class to include PostId field as well as the Post object in order to get the relationship as such.

public class Comment
{
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual string CommentText { get; set; }
    public virtual int PostId { get; set; } // added in for entityframework
    public virtual Post Post { get; set; }
    public virtual int UserId { get; set; }
}

With this field added into my domain object the mappings now seem to work, but I feel slightly uneasy about this as it feels like Entityframework if forcing me to change my domain, and I was under the impression that the domain model should know nothing of the persistence layer.

So do I really need this extra PostId field added in to my Comment class to get the relationship to work or am I doing something wrong?

Am I just being to pedantic about the domain being affected by the change in persistence layer?

Doesn't having the Post and PostId fields together like this mean that if say you change PostId, you will also have to handle the change to update Post field or vice versa in the Comment class?

Thanks

CD

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When generating the data model in EF you can un-check "Include foreign key columns in the model" However from memory this means that EF might have to go to the DB to get the Comment.Post.Id whereas in NH it doesn't –  Rippo Nov 13 '13 at 15:27
    
I was not using the generate data model, my domain was already built as it worked with an existing db via NHibernate before, I have inherited the DbContext class and added any mappings I may need in the override of the OnModelCreating method. –  Mr Cecil Dooberry Nov 13 '13 at 15:36
    
Is there any reason Post isn't an aggregate root on its own? Does Post enforce any invariants on its comments? –  JefClaes Nov 15 '13 at 9:18
    
The Post / Comment thing is just an example I chose, it could have easily been Order / OrderLineItem, the point I was trying to get to was, would I need in the OrderLineItem class the Order and OrderId for it to work with Entity Framework as opposed to how NHibernate would allow me to just have the Order property in the OrderLineItem class without the extra OrderId field, but that is my understanding at the moment. –  Mr Cecil Dooberry Nov 15 '13 at 11:37
1  
I found this article a few mins ago and it seems to explain it all nicely, ladislavmrnka.com/2011/05/… –  Mr Cecil Dooberry Nov 15 '13 at 11:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In my opinion, this is one of the major deficiencies of Entity Framework. You can get EF to work without adding the foreign key, however your application will have to retrieve the entity from the database in order to set the property because EF does not have the equivalent of NHibernate's ISession.Load method.

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