Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In this code, this line is causing an exception:

clearText = c.doFinal(Base64.decode(encryptedText, Base64.DEFAULT));

javax.crypto.BadPaddingException: pad block corrupted

I got the code from: http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/software-engineer/attention-android-developers-keep-user-data-safe/

Any ideas?

    private String decrypt (String encryptedText) {
        byte[] clearText = null;
        try {
            SecretKeySpec ks = new SecretKeySpec(getKey(), "AES");
            Cipher c = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
            c.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, ks);
            clearText = c.doFinal(Base64.decode(encryptedText, Base64.DEFAULT));
            return new String(clearText, "UTF-8");
        } catch (Exception e) {
            return null;
        }
    }

Details: I am encrypting it on the android as well

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Java + Android + Encryption + Exception means just one thing normally, somebody is using the SecureRandom class again as a key derivation function. This fails when the SecureRandom implementation of "SHA1PRNG" does not behave as the one in Sun's implementation in Java SE. Especially if the seed is added to the state of the random number generator instead of the seed being used as a starting point of the PRNG.

Basically, simply use SecretKey aesKey = new SecretKeySpec(byte[] keyData, "AES") instead, or - if you start off with a passport - try and generate the key using PBKDF2.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't it more secure in the way stated in the link? If the guy took time to make a guide, it probably works on his machine, but why not mine? –  Esq Nov 14 '13 at 13:19
    
byte[] keyData = "0123456789012345".getBytes(); SecretKey ks = new SecretKeySpec(keyData, "AES"); I tried this, it works. Buttt, since now it doesn't convert to 128-192-256-bits automatically, I had to enter it manually, I think I need to add a method which converts automatically, any recommendation? –  Esq Nov 14 '13 at 13:57
    
@Esq There is no standardized way of creating smaller or larger keys by just adding zero values as it would obviously bring down the security provided by the key. So to do this it is required to use a KDF, that could be a KBKDF if there is enough entropy in the key data you now have. If there is less than 16 bytes of data (for AES-128) then you should strengthen the key by using a PBKDF. The PBKDF2 method has been implemented by Java. KBKDF's are not present, but they are relatively easy to construct from a HMAC, e.g. you could use HKDF. –  Maarten Bodewes Nov 14 '13 at 16:17
1  
If KBKDF's are not an option, then use a HMAC with output size as big or bigger than the key and use the leftmost bytes. If you need more keys, use a different salt for each key (a publicly known input to the hash before the key data). –  Maarten Bodewes Nov 14 '13 at 16:19
up vote 3 down vote accepted

owlstead's advice was helpful, but for this case when using the code in

Attention Android developers: Keep user data safe http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/software-engineer/attention-android-developers-keep-user-data-safe/

I made some changes to the code that might be helpful for other people in the future. I completely deleted the getkey method.

private static String seed;

/**
 * Encrypts the text. 
 * @param clearText The text you want to encrypt
 * @return Encrypted data if successful, or null if unsucessful
 */
protected String encrypt(String clearText) {
    byte[] encryptedText = null;
    try {
        byte[] keyData = seed.getBytes();
        SecretKey ks = new SecretKeySpec(keyData, "AES");
        Cipher c = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
        c.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, ks);
        encryptedText = c.doFinal(clearText.getBytes("UTF-8"));
        return Base64.encodeToString(encryptedText, Base64.DEFAULT);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        return null;
    }
}

/**
 * Decrypts the text
 * @param encryptedText The text you want to encrypt
 * @return Decrypted data if successful, or null if unsucessful
 */
protected String decrypt (String encryptedText) {
    byte[] clearText = null;
    try {
        byte[] keyData = seed.getBytes();
        SecretKey ks = new SecretKeySpec(keyData, "AES");
        Cipher c = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
        c.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, ks);
        clearText = c.doFinal(Base64.decode(encryptedText, Base64.DEFAULT));
        return new String(clearText, "UTF-8");
    } catch (Exception e) {
        return null;
    }
}   
share|improve this answer
1  
You should not be creating such examples if you are not sure what you are doing. For instance, you are still using AES ECB mode, which is unsafe. You are using getBytes() without specifying an encoding. You are using a string as if it was a key. Basically, you've fixed one issue but kept at least three others. –  Maarten Bodewes Nov 30 '13 at 1:37
    
opened up to community wiki in case if you want to fix the things you mentioned. –  Esq Nov 30 '13 at 17:38
    
Thanks, however I would have to do a rewrite, and in the end I would end up with code similar to this answer. Maybe you want to take a look at it, it also contains some security advice. –  Maarten Bodewes Nov 30 '13 at 17:45
    
thanks, i'll check it out –  Esq Nov 30 '13 at 17:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.