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let's say I have the next class which include many data memebers:

Class A
{
public:
  .
  .
  .

private:

  string a1;
  string a2;
  vector<string> vec1;
  .
  .
  .
  .

}

and let's say I have a recursive function called foo() with many local variables of type A:

void foo()
{
  A a_1;
  A a_2;
  A a_3;
  .
  .
  .
  A a_n;
}

as you can see in the class definition, today, the data members of A are real objects and not pointers. I know that all those data members are stored on the stack, the stack has a limited size (in my case 512MB) and I was wandering, will it be better to replace the data members with pointers which will point to data on the heap?

Thank you.

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closed as too broad by Barmar, lpapp, Cassio Neri, Daniel Daranas, leemes Nov 13 '13 at 16:27

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
It depends on what you use the pointers for. You need to be more specific. –  juanchopanza Nov 13 '13 at 15:59
    
It's not much different from deciding when to implement ordinary variables as pointers or real variables. –  Barmar Nov 13 '13 at 16:00
4  
Don't forget that in C++ you have references too. And if you need to use pointers, think about using smart pointers. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 13 '13 at 16:01
2  
The simple rule is "don't use pointers". The advanced rule is "don't use pointers unless you know what you're doing with them". –  Mike Seymour Nov 13 '13 at 16:03
    
You'd be surprised how much you can achieve with int, string, vector<>, and struct to combine them together. Pass these around by value most of the time. And take a parameter by reference, on occasion, when you want to use that variable as an output-parameter. –  Aaron McDaid Nov 13 '13 at 16:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would say that the rule of thumb is "don't complicate your life by using pointers if you don't need to".

In C++, there are references, that are (in my humble opinion) easier to use and understand. Regarding methods in a class, it's often necessary to pass objects by reference so that you avoid destroying objects you will need; but as far as variables go, I don't think it's very common that you need to use pointers. :)

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Hi Eutherpy and thanks for the answer, in my case I can't use references because I want to be able to change the value of my class' data members. –  eladm26 Nov 14 '13 at 5:30

As a possible answer, if you know the exact type of the object at runtime, use the stack variables or references. If you do not know the type of an object at runtime, use the pointers. The same rule applies to the arguments of functions. Thank you.

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When you say runtime, do you mean compile-time? –  Grimm The Opiner Nov 13 '13 at 16:17
    
No, under runtime, I mean an execution stage of the final application/executable. –  Alexander Borodulya Nov 13 '13 at 16:25

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