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I want to be able to write a lambda/Proc in my Ruby code, serialize it so that I can write it to disk, and then execute the lambda later. Sort of like...

x = 40
f = lambda { |y| x + y }
save_for_later(f)

Later, in a separate run of the Ruby interpreter, I want to be able to say...

f = load_from_before
z = f.call(2)
z.should == 42

Marshal.dump does not work for Procs. I know Perl has Data::Dump::Streamer, and in Lisp this is trivial. But is there a way to do it in Ruby? In other words, what would be the implementation of save_for_later?

Edit: My answer below is nice, but it does not close over free variables (like x) and serialize them along with the lambda. So in my example ...

x = 40
s = save_for_later { |y| x + y }
# => "lambda { |y|\n  (x + y)\n}"

... the string output does not include a definition for x. Is there a solution that takes this into account, perhaps by serializing the symbol table? Can you access that in Ruby?

Edit 2: I updated my answer to incorporate serializing local variables. This seems acceptable.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Use Ruby2Ruby

def save_for_later(&block)
  return nil unless block_given?

  c = Class.new
  c.class_eval do
    define_method :serializable, &block
  end
  s = Ruby2Ruby.translate(c, :serializable)
  s.sub(/^def \S+\(([^\)]*)\)/, 'lambda { |\1|').sub(/end$/, '}')
end

x = 40
s = save_for_later { |y| x + y }
# => "lambda { |y|\n  (x + y)\n}"
g = eval(s)
# => #<Proc:0x4037bb2c@(eval):1>
g.call(2) 
# => 42

This is great, but it does not close over free variables (like x) and serialize them along with the lambda.

To serialize variables also, you can iterate over local_variables and serialize them as well. The problem, though, is that local_variables from within save_for_later accesses only c and s in the code above -- i.e. variables local to the serialization code, not the caller. So unfortunately, we must push the grabbing of local variables and their values to the caller.

Maybe this is a good thing, though, because in general, finding all free variables in a piece of Ruby code is undecidable. Plus, ideally we would also save global_variables and any loaded classes and their overridden methods. This seems impractical.

Using this simple approach, you get the following:

def save_for_later(local_vars, &block)
  return nil unless block_given?

  c = Class.new
  c.class_eval do
    define_method :serializable, &block
  end
  s = Ruby2Ruby.translate(c, :serializable)
  locals = local_vars.map { |var,val| "#{var} = #{val.inspect}; " }.join
  s.sub(/^def \S+\(([^\)]*)\)/, 'lambda { |\1| ' + locals).sub(/end$/, '}')
end

x = 40
s = save_for_later(local_variables.map{ |v| [v,eval(v)] }) { |y| x + y }
# => "lambda { |y| _ = 40; x = 40;\n  (x + y)\n}"

# In a separate run of Ruby, where x is not defined...
g = eval("lambda { |y| _ = 40; x = 40;\n  (x + y)\n}")
# => #<Proc:0xb7cfe9c0@(eval):1>
g.call(2)
# => 42

# Changing x does not affect it.
x = 7
g.call(3)
# => 43
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My version of Ruby2Ruby (1.2.4) doesn't seem to have a translate method. Is there a different api for this in newer versions? –  Stephen McCarthy Mar 2 '10 at 21:24
1  
I don't quite understand it, but this thread recommends downgrading to Ruby2Ruby 1.2.2. I also found this monkey patch which claims to add it back to later versions. Haven't tried it though. –  Jonathan Tran Mar 4 '10 at 2:59
1  
It sucks that it doesn't work with Ruby 1.9... –  Kludge Dec 10 '10 at 0:26
    
@Kludge You can use sourcify instead. See my other answer. –  Jonathan Tran May 20 '11 at 13:31

Use sourcify

This will work on Ruby 1.8 or 1.9.

def save_for_later(&block)
  block.to_source
end

x = 40
s = save_for_later {|y| x + y }
# => "proc { |y| (x + y) }"
g = eval(s)
# => #<Proc:0x00000100e88450@(eval):1>
g.call(2) 
# => 42

See my other answer for capturing free variables.

Update: Now you can also use the serializable_proc gem, which uses sourcify, and captures local, instance, class, and global variables.

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Is there an example anywhere of using sourcify with capturing free variables? –  rogerdpack Apr 4 '12 at 0:16
    
@rogerdpack, see my update. You may just want to use the serializable_proc gem if you care about free variables. –  Jonathan Tran Sep 17 '12 at 18:52

Check out the answers to this question.

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Ruby has the Marshal class that has a dump method that you can call.

Take a look here:

http://rubylearning.com/satishtalim/object_serialization.html

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1  
Marshal doesn't do lambdas. –  Jonathan Tran Oct 14 '08 at 0:54
    
Marshal doesn't actually work on Procs, which what the question is asking about. –  Kyle Burton Oct 14 '08 at 0:56

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