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To combine two parts of a file path, you can do

System.IO.Path.Combine (path1, path2);

However, you can't do

System.IO.Path.Combine (path1, path2, path3);

Is there a simple way to do this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

As others have said, in .NET 3.5 and earlier versions there hasn't been a way to do this neatly - you either have to write your own Combine method or call Path.Combine multiple times.

But rejoice - for in .NET 4.0, there is this overload:

public static string Combine(
    params string[] paths
)

There are also overloads taking 3 or 4 strings, presumably so that it doesn't need to create an array unnecessarily for common cases.

Hopefully Mono will port those overloads soon - I'm sure they'd be easy to implement and much appreciated.

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Shouldn't declaring single array be more efficient then declaring 4 different variables? What could be the reason for 4 or 3 string overload? –  Hasan Khan Jan 3 '10 at 20:40
1  
@Hasan: No, creating an array requires a separate object which has to be garbage collected later, etc. Passing two separate variables is more efficient than creating a new array containing two references. –  Jon Skeet Jan 3 '10 at 20:53
5  
No need to wait, it's implemented since 10/21/09 :) anonsvn.mono-project.com/… –  Kha Jan 3 '10 at 21:01
2  
msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd784047(VS.90).aspx states that Path.Combine will take 3 strings in .Net 3.5 which is clearly wrong since it gives a compiler error when used. the msdn library is wrong in this case. I put this here in case someone else lands on this page after getting this compiler error. –  Maggie Jul 20 '10 at 20:45
    
Now that .NET 4.0 is out, I have changed the accepted answer to this answer. –  Matthew Aug 4 '11 at 18:41
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Here's a utility method you can use:

public static string CombinePaths(string path1, params string[] paths)
{
    if (path1 == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("path1");
    }
    if (paths == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("paths");
    }
    return paths.Aggregate(path1, (acc, p) => Path.Combine(acc, p));
}

Alternate code-golf version (shorter, but not quite as clear, semantics are a bit different from Path.Combine):

public static string CombinePaths(params string[] paths)
{
    if (paths == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("paths");
    }
    return paths.Aggregate(Path.Combine);
}

Then you can call this as:

string path = CombinePaths(path1, path2, path3);
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@Downvoter: Let's hear it. –  Aaronaught Jan 3 '10 at 20:28
    
This might be a stupid question, but where does Aggregate come from? I'm using Mono targeting Mono / .Net 3.5, and the compiler can't find it. –  Matthew Jan 3 '10 at 20:32
1  
using System.Linq. –  SLaks Jan 3 '10 at 20:34
2  
Ahh - Aggregate is an extension method in the System.Linq namespace, which is in System.Core.dll. –  Aaronaught Jan 3 '10 at 20:35
5  
Why the extra 'path1' parameter? Also, the last line can be shortened to return paths.Aggregate(/*path1, */Path.Combine); –  Kha Jan 3 '10 at 20:37
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Not simple, but clever :)

string str1 = "aaa", str2 = "bbb", str3 = "ccc";
string comb = new string[] { str1, str2, str3 }
    .Aggregate((x, y) => System.IO.Path.Combine(x, y));

Or:

string CombinePaths(params string[] paths)
{
    return paths.Aggregate((x,y) => System.IO.Path.Combine(x, y));
}
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This is handy if you're not doing it more than once. You can simplify it a lot, though: new [] { "aaa", "bbb", "ccc" }.Aggregate (Path.Combine); (assuming you are using System.IO;). –  Matthew Mar 27 '11 at 19:13
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Nope - you have to call Path.Combine() several times.

You could write a helper method that does it for you, though:

public static string CombinePaths(params string[] paths) {
    if (paths == null) {
        return null;
    }
    string currentPath = paths[0];
    for (int i = 1; i < paths.Length; i++) {
        currentPath = Path.Combine(currentPath, paths[i]);
    }
    return currentPath;
}
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1  
+1 - Perfect because you added no unnecessary LINQ. –  ChaosPandion Jan 3 '10 at 20:23
1  
Taking a look at the logic you can easily get rid of that second if statement. –  ChaosPandion Jan 3 '10 at 20:26
    
@ChaosPandion: If you're going to avoid Linq then you should also optimize the Schlemiel-the-painter algorithm and instead use Path.PathSeparator and other static fields with a StringBuilder. I figured performance wasn't an issue here. –  Aaronaught Jan 3 '10 at 20:27
1  
"Unnecessary LINQ"? Perhaps you forgot to specify the [.net-2.0] tag? –  Kyralessa Jan 3 '10 at 20:30
3  
@ChaosPandion - "unnecessary Linq"? Maybe - if performance was critical. Or perhaps if only .Net 2. But actually the Linq approach is simple, concise and intentional. And if it gets people to think in functional terms it is no bad thing. –  Rob Levine Jan 3 '10 at 20:34
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