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The following Problem drives me nuts, though it doesn't seem very odd:

class Foo;

// This is the location of the first error code
//        ↓
int (Foo::*)(int) getPointer()
{
    return 0;
}

GCC gives me:

error: expected unqualified-id before ')' token
error: expected initializer before 'getPointer'

PS: I compile with -std=c++11

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1  
For God's sake use typedefs –  Slava Nov 13 '13 at 19:00
1  
@Slava Totally agree, but it's also nice to understand how it works. –  Macmade Nov 13 '13 at 19:13
    
@Slava I cannot, since the return type is dependent of a deduced template parameter and you cannot typedef between 'template<>' and 'getPointer()' –  Jakob Riedle Nov 13 '13 at 19:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
int ( Foo::* ( getPointer() ) )();

That being said, remember you can use typedef. For function pointers, it usually improves the overall readability:

typedef int ( Foo::* TypeName )();

TypeName getPointer();
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use a typedef, like:

class Foo;

typedef int (Foo::*POINTER)(int);

POINTER getPointer()
{
    return 0;
}

For more reasoning here goes: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq/typedef-for-ptr-to-memfn.html

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It is usually bad idea to use all uppercase identifiers. –  Slava Nov 13 '13 at 19:03
    
It usually depends on the coding standard your company decided to adopt. –  fritzone Nov 13 '13 at 19:06
1  
to use uppercase identifiers for preprocessor does not seem to be a company coding standard, but used everywhere. –  Slava Nov 13 '13 at 19:11

Looks like you are trying to use function pointers, but not giving a name to it :P

Use this:

int (Foo::*myPointer)(int) getPointer()
{
    return 0;
}
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