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Is there any way to instantiate Caller<pfn> from the constructor Foo()?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct Foo
{
    template<void(*pfn)()>
    struct Caller
    {
        static void call() { pfn(); }
    };

    template<typename FN>
    Foo(FN fn)
    {
        Caller<FN>::call();  // illegal type for non-type template parameter 'pfn'
    }
};

void Bar()
{
    cout << "bar" << endl;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    Foo foo(&Bar);
    return 0;
}
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No, not from this constructor. Function parameters are not (assumed to be) compile-time constants. What do you want to achieve? Maybe it's possible in another way. –  dyp Nov 13 '13 at 19:34
    
Why Caller needs to be a template? You can pass pfn to it through a constructor. –  thesamet Nov 13 '13 at 19:36
    
I'm trying to avoid storing a copy of pfn inside Caller, but while retrieving the function pointer from the constructor Foo() by deduction. My real code needs several function pointers, so storage goes up, and syntax gets messy. Thought there may be some trick I can use here. –  bitwise Nov 13 '13 at 19:38
    
also, I am passing member functions, which would require another template parameter, which I would like to avoid. –  bitwise Nov 13 '13 at 19:44
    
"but while retrieving the function pointer from the constructor Foo() by deduction" Use auto? E.g. auto foo = &Bar; or wrap the function pointer in some class (as a non-type template parameter, see sehe's solution) and then use a function to deduce it, e.g. auto foo = make_fptr_type(&Bar); –  dyp Nov 13 '13 at 19:46

3 Answers 3

You need to provide the function's type for class not just for constructor. It's just a workaround and you can use it as a start point:

template <typename F>
struct Foo
{
    struct Caller
    {
        static void call(F fn)
        {
            fn();
        }
    };

    Foo(F fn)
    {
        Caller::call(fn);
    }
};

void Bar()
{
    cout << "bar" << endl;
}

int main()
{
    Foo<decltype(Bar)> foo(Bar);
}

If Foo can not be template base then use this:

struct Foo
{
    template <typename F>
    struct Caller
    {
        static void call(F fn)
        {
            fn();
        }
    };

    template <typename F>
    Foo(F fn)
    {
        Caller<F>::call(fn);
    }
};

void Bar()
{
    cout << "bar" << endl;
}

int main()
{
    Foo foo(Bar);
}
share|improve this answer
    
for my needs, Foo cannot be a template –  bitwise Nov 13 '13 at 19:44
1  
@bitwise: I've just added another code. See it. –  M M. Nov 13 '13 at 19:50
    
in my real use case, Caller needs to be called later on, and must contain several function pointers. If they were passed as template parameters, I could avoid the storage cost, but I am trying to do that without explicitly passing them through template args, because they are member functions, and they are many, so it would be messy –  bitwise Nov 13 '13 at 19:54

Perhaps you meant something like he following:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct Foo
{
    template<void(*pfn)()> // CHANGED
    struct Caller
    {
        static void call() { pfn(); }
    };
};

void Bar()
{
    cout << "bar" << endl;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    Foo::Caller<&Bar>::call(); // CHANGED
}

note the change here:

 template<void(*pfn)()>
share|improve this answer
    
I am trying to avoid passing the function pointer explicitly as a template parameter. –  bitwise Nov 13 '13 at 19:46

This is not possible.

A compile time constant function pointer cannot be used as one after being passed as a function argument.

Also, a compile time constant function pointer for a specific a function cannot be obtained using a function pointer type alone.

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