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I want to remove a JButton of a gridLayout, using actionListener. I wanto to leave in blank the space of the JButton that has been removed and later fill that space with a JLabel or something.

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;
public class bottons extends JFrame implements ActionListener{

private JPanel test;
    private JButton[][] buttons;
private JuegoBuca(){

        setVisible(true);
        setSize(500,500);
        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setTitle("Test");
        setResizable(false);


        buttons = new JButton[5][5];

        test = new JPanel();
        test.setLayout(new GridLayout(5,5));


        for(int i = 0 ; i<5 ; i++){
            for(int j = 0; j<5 ; j++){
                test.add(buttons[i][j] = new JButton(Integer.toString(index++)));

               buttons[i][j].addActionListener(this);
            }
        }

        add(test, BorderLayout.CENTER);


    }

public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
         Object o =  e.getSource();
         for(int i = 0; i<5 ; i++){
             for(int j = 0 ; j<5; j++){
                 if(buttons[i][j] == o){
                    test.remove(buttons[i][j]); 
                 }
             }
         }
}

In the method of actionListener, it takes out the JButton, but it moves the others buttons and fill the space. Index is just to have something in the button to make visible the change. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I would just use JButton instances for everything and no JLabel. When the button is supposed to look like something, set an icon to it. When it is supposed to look like 'nothing', simply set a blank (transparent) image to the button as icon instead of the first icon. –  Andrew Thompson Nov 13 '13 at 19:39
2  
So, if you take the time to read the answer I left with on your previous questions you'll see the answer –  MadProgrammer Nov 13 '13 at 19:40
    
-1, Yes, this is the 3rd or 4th question on the topic (it looks like the other have been deleted). Quit cluttering the forum with duplicate questions and pay attention to answers you have already received. Having said that, instead of creating an ArrayList to search for your button, I would just use the Container.getComponents() method so you don't need to track the buttons in two places. –  camickr Nov 13 '13 at 19:42
    
Your answere is really nice thanks, but mustn't use ArrayLists. –  Mac Nov 13 '13 at 19:44
    
@Pony, but mustn't use ArrayLists - I gave you an alternate approach above. –  camickr Nov 13 '13 at 19:46

3 Answers 3

So, based on the concept presented in your previous question, you need to know where the component you are removing resides within the container.

Luckily for you, GridLayout lays out each component based on the order in which it was added. This means you simply need to ascertain the position of the current component within the container before you remove it and add the new component where it was.

public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
    Object o =  e.getSource();
    for(int i = 0; i<5 ; i++){
        for(int j = 0 ; j<5; j++){
            if(buttons[i][j] == o){
                // Find the position of the component within the container
                int index = getComponentZOrder(buttons[i][j]);
                // Remove the old component
                test.remove(buttons[i][j]);
                // Replace it with a new component at the same position 
                add(new JLabel("I was here"), index);
            }
        }
    }
}

For an example, see your previous question

share|improve this answer

Instead of adding the button directly to the GridLayout, you could instead add a JPanel that had a CardLayout to the cell. This would allow you add multiple 'cards' to the cell and switch between them. One 'card' could even be blank if you wanted to give the appearance of the cell being blank.

share|improve this answer
@Override
public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
    Object o = e.getSource();
    Component[] components = test.getComponents();

    for (int i = 0; i < components.length; i++) {
        if (components[i] == o) {
            // Remove the button that was clicked.
            test.remove(i);

            // Add a blank label in place of the button.
            test.add(new JLabel(), i);
        }
    }

    // Force Swing to repaint the panel.
    test.repaint();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Index may not represent the buttons position within the container –  MadProgrammer Nov 13 '13 at 19:49
    
Yes, you are correct @MadProgrammer about index. I rewrote my answer which I believe corrects the problem. –  Barzee Nov 13 '13 at 20:03

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