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I am in a conundrum. I am trying to figure out why the incrementing counter isn't increment. It returns a value of only one. The idea is that are a random time that incrementing counter t_years would go down to zero and begin again while another counter would just keep running.

import time, math, random

t0 = time.time()
average_life_span = .10

while True:
    time.sleep(.01)
    a = time.time()
    age = int (a*1000) - int(t0*1000) #millis

    t_years = 0
    while (int (age) < int (random.normalvariate (average_life_span, 1))):
            t_years = 0
    else:
            t_years = t_years + .01

    print age, t_years
share|improve this question
    
@roippi, good point. There should probably be logic in the inner while loop that changes the value of age. Otherwise, if the while loop begins, it will never, ever end... –  Alex Chumbley Nov 13 '13 at 20:23
    
No it isn't an infinite loop. The right-hand side is an expression that generates a random number. It will be different each time through. So it will only loop infinitely if it's less than the entire range; if it's anywhere within the range it will loop a finite (but nondeterministic) number of times, which is a perfectly reasonable thing to do. –  abarnert Nov 13 '13 at 20:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You set t_years = 0 before the inner loop, then again each time through the loop.

When you finally finish the inner loop, in the else clause, you add .01. So now it's guaranteed to be 0.01.

The next time through the outer loop, you again reset it to 0, and then do so over and over again, and finally add .01 to that at the end. So it's again guaranteed to be 0.01.

If you want the number to start at 0 and increment by 0.01 each time through the outer loop, don't keep resetting it to 0. Do this:

t_years = 0

while True:
    time.sleep(.01)
    a = time.time()
    age = int (a*1000) - int(t0*1000) #millis

    while (int (age) < int (random.normalvariate (average_life_span, 1))):
        pass
    else:
        t_years = t_years + .01

    print age, t_years

I'm not sure what this loop is actually supposed to be doing. I don't think it will ever be triggered, but even if it is, all it can do is delay for a random amount of time burning as much CPU as possible while doing so. Why would you want to do that?

share|improve this answer
    
while (int (age) < int (random.normalvariate (average_life_span, 1))): pass –  Aaron Gilbee Nov 13 '13 at 20:23
1  
@AaronGilbee: Yes? –  abarnert Nov 13 '13 at 20:25
    
that works. so the idea is that while the int age is less than the life span, it will keep incrementing. But there should be a time when the age gets beyond lifespan and resets t_years to zero. –  Aaron Gilbee Nov 13 '13 at 20:26
    
there are two incrementing values. t_years dies off at random intervals. –  Aaron Gilbee Nov 13 '13 at 20:27
    
I am not sure why that command doesn't kick in. –  Aaron Gilbee Nov 13 '13 at 20:29

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