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Say I have a class in Typescript.

class MyAnimal {

   constructor(param1, param2) {
       voice: param1;
       height: param2;
   }
}

How do I actually construct the class so that I can access those properties when using the object:

var gorilla = new MyAnimal(param1, param2);

The above yields a compile error: Error TS2094: "The property voice does not exist on value of type 'MyAnimal'."

I converted this over from javascript, where it was working fine, however then it looked like this:

var MyAnimal = function (param1, param2) {
    return {
        voice: param1,
        height: param2,
    }
}

With that, I could access properties all day

var gorilla = MyAnimal(param1, param2);
if (gorilla.height < 5)
    alert("It's a baby gorilla!");

I am pretty new to Typescript/javascript, so there's a lot I am still trying to figure out. I wouldn't think it should be that hard to access properties. I have a suspicion I am just trying to access it incorrectly.

Am I just building the class wrong? Why can't I retrieve properties when I new up an instance of MyAnimal?

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2  
You're using propName: notation outside of an object literal. That creates labels. Try = instead. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Nov 13 '13 at 21:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
constructor(param1, param2) {
   voice: param1;
   height: param2;
}

This code simply defines two statement labels called 'voice' and 'height' and does nothing with the parameters. Instead what you want to do is:

class MyAnimal {
    voice: string;
    height: number;

   constructor(param1, param2) {
       this.voice = param1;
       this.height = param2;
   }
}

You might want to read the TypeScript Tutorials to get a feel for the basics of the language.

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Thanks all for the quick replies. As it turns out I just found an article from msdn that gave an example very similar to your answer, so I implemented that format at it seems to be working, thanks! (insert sheepish smile as I run off to revisit the tutorials) –  wjhguitarman Nov 13 '13 at 21:51
1  
This really was the better answer given that it helped the user with the specific syntax problem they were having as opposed to offering up something completely different... even though I like the syntax in my answer better. ;) –  Alex Dresko Nov 13 '13 at 22:01

This might be the easiest way to fix your code. This automatically creates the public property from the constructor parameters.

class MyAnimal {
       constructor(public voice, public height) {
   }
}

So now you can do this:

var animal = new MyAnimal("rawr", 23);

// use animal.voice
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