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So I've read all the similar questions and copied what they wrote but I still keep having issues. So I want something like this

# Yes, I know django has one but I want to make my own
@rate_limit(seconds=10) 
myview(request, somearg, *args, **kwargs):
    # Return a response
...

def rate_limit(seconds=10):    
    def decorator(view):            
        def wrapper(request, *args, **kwargs):
            # Do some stuff
            return view(request, *args, **kwargs)       
        return wrapper
    return decorator

When I run it I get the error

decorator() got an unexpected keyword argument 'somearg'

So I append decorator to take in args and kwargs and get this error

# New decorator signature
def decorator(view, *args, **kwargs)

and error

'function' object has no attribute 'status_code'

edit: So the solution was to use. Thanks Martijn Pieters!

@rate_limit()

instead of

@rate_limit
share|improve this question
1  
Hrm, none of these errors appear to make sense. You do want to use functools.wraps() to decorate the wrapper(): from functools import wraps, then @wraps(view) decorating def wrapper(...). –  Martijn Pieters Nov 13 '13 at 21:50
    
Just change def decorator(view): to def decorator(view, *args, **kwargs): –  karthikr Nov 13 '13 at 21:50
    
@karthikr: That is not the problem. It cannot be, because a decorator is passed just the function-to-decorate. I strongly suspect this is not the full code the OP ran. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 13 '13 at 21:51
1  
@karthikr: that is addressing the wrong problem. I suspect the OP did not call the decorator factory. @rate_limit vs. @rate_limit(10). –  Martijn Pieters Nov 13 '13 at 21:52
1  
@karthikr: No you can not. It is rate_limit() is a decorator factory. It produces the decorator. decorator() is the actual decorator here. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 13 '13 at 21:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your first attempt works just fine, but you probably forgot to call the rate_limit() decorator factory.

In other words, your first error occurs if you do this:

@rate_limit
def myview(request, somearg, *args, **kwargs):

instead of:

@rate_limit(seconds=10)
def myview(request, somearg, *args, **kwargs):

You also really want to use functools.wraps() on decorators used in Django, especially if you want to mix this with other Django decorators such as csrf_exempt:

from functools import wraps

def rate_limit(seconds=10):
    def decorator(view):
        @wraps(view)
        def wrapper(request, *args, **kwargs):
            # Do some stuff
            return view(request, *args, **kwargs)
        return wrapper
    return decorator

This ensures that any attributes set on the to-be-wrapped function are copied over correctly to the wrapper.

share|improve this answer
    
This did the trick! I mean, adding () to my decorator after adding args and kwargs to decorator. Why is it that I have to call it like @rate_limit() instead of @rate_limit like other decorators? Or are the parenthesis always required if it takes arguments? –  Jared Joke Nov 13 '13 at 22:00
1  
@JaredJoke: rate_limit() is a decorator factory. It produces the actual decorator (it returns decorator) letting you build a different decorator based on the arguments. rate_limit(10) returns one decorator, rate_limit(20) returns another. Python then uses the decorator returned to actually decorate the myview() view function. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 13 '13 at 22:02
1  
@JaredJoke: @some_expression really just means: execute some_expression, then take the result (which must be a callable), and call it with the function-to-decorate. So rate_limit(10) returns decorator, which is called passing in myview, and decorator in turn returns wrapper() to replace the myview function. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 13 '13 at 22:03

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