Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I often see code like:

if(myQMap.contains("my key")){
    myValue = myQMap["my key"];
}

which theoretically performs two look-up's in the QMap.

My first reaction is that it should be replaced by the following, which performs one lookup only and should be two times faster:

auto it = myQMap.find("my key");
if(it != myQMap.end()){
    myValue = it.value();
}

I am wondering if QMap does this optimization automatically for me ? In other words, I am wondering if QMap saves the position of the last element found with QMap::contains() and checks it first before performing the next lookup ?

Thanks !

share|improve this question
3  
Pretty sure it does not. You can use the same const QMap from multiple threads which would cause serious trouble if it were caching anything (and even in the best caching would only work for one thread) – BeniBela Nov 13 '13 at 23:21
1  
Here is the source code for QMap: qt.gitorious.org/qt/qt/source/… it isn't trivial to read, but it should help you get an answer if you really want it. – Yakk Nov 14 '13 at 4:28
    
@BeniBela I would expect that most of the times a QMap will be accessed from one thread, so if the optimization works only for one thread, it is still worth implementing it. – nbilal Nov 14 '13 at 14:54
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would expect that QMap provides both functions for a better interface to the class. It's more natural to ask if the map 'contains' a value with a specified key than it is to call the 'find' function.

As the code shows, both find and contains call the following internal function: -

Node *n = d->findNode(akey);

So if you're going to use the returned iterator, then using find and checking the return value will be more efficient, but if you just want to know if the value exists in the map, calling contains is better for readability.

If you look at the source code, you'll see that QMap is implemented as a binary tree structure of nodes. Calling findNode iterates through the nodes and does not cache the result.

share|improve this answer
    
How do you know that findNode(akey) don't do some caching itself ? if (akey == lastKey){return lastNode;} – nbilal Nov 14 '13 at 14:42
1  
@nbilal, please correct me if I'm wrong, but looking at the source code, it doesn't appear to do so. – TheDarkKnight Nov 14 '13 at 14:46
    
I wouldn't ask here if I knew the answer :) You half answered my question, maybe you can improve your answer by explaining and giving some kind of proof that findNode itself doesn't do any caching. Thanks. – nbilal Nov 14 '13 at 14:59
1  
If you look at the source code, you'll see that QMap is implemented as a binary tree structure of nodes. Calling findNode iterates through the nodes and does not cache the result. – TheDarkKnight Nov 14 '13 at 15:25
2  
Really?! You're kidding, right? You want me to post Qt code to show you something isn't there? In addition, the link in the answer by @hluk is the source code. Click that and follow the function calls. – TheDarkKnight Nov 15 '13 at 23:35

QMap source code reveals that there is no special code in QMap::contains() method.

In some cases you can use QMap::value() or QMap::values() to get value for a key and check if it is correct. These methods (and const operator[]) will copy the value, although this is probably OK for most Qt types since their underlying data are copied-on-write (notably QMap itself).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.