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In the following function, I am parsing string form a linked list and giving values to struct array. Is there any way that let me not use mallocs inside while loop.I can not handle glibc errors, so looking for other way.I tried to use char arrays instead of char* for the struct fields. But I am getting seg error. Actually the function is working, but I ahve to call the function 15000 times later, so I want to make sure it won't cause any memory trouble that time.

struct CoordNode
{
int resNum;
double coordX;
double coordY;
double coordZ;
char atomName[4];     
};
void parseCrdList()
{
int resNum=1;
int tAtomNum,i;
char *tcoordX, *tcoordY, *tcoordZ, *tatomName, tresNum[5]; 
ccur_node=headCoord_node->next;  
struct CoordNode *t;
t=malloc(numofRes*sizeof(struct CoordNode));
i=0;
while (ccur_node!=NULL)
{     
      tresNum=malloc(5*sizeof(char));
      memcpy(tresNum,ccur_node->crdRow+26,4);
      resNum=atoi(tresNum);                  
      t[i].resNum=resNum;
      tcoordX=malloc(8*sizeof(char));
      memcpy(tcoordX,ccur_node->crdRow+35,7);         
      tcoordY=malloc(8*sizeof(char));
      memcpy(tcoordY,ccur_node->crdRow+43,7);       
      tcoordZ=malloc(8*sizeof(char));
      memcpy(tcoordZ,ccur_node->crdRow+51,7);                        
      t[i].coordX=strtod(tcoordX,NULL);
      t[i].coordY=strtod(tcoordY,NULL);
      t[i].coordZ=strtod(tcoordZ,NULL);         
      tatomName=malloc(4*sizeof(char));         
      memcpy(tatomName,ccur_node->crdRow+17,3);        
      strcpy(t[i].atomName,tatomName);        
      old_ccur_node=ccur_node;
      ccur_node=ccur_node->next;
      //free(old_ccur_node);          
      i++;  
}
      numofRes=i;
      addCoordData(t);
      //free(t);
      t=NULL;
}
share|improve this question
    
It sounds like your real question is how to use character arrays rather than malloc-ed memory for tcoordX, tcoordY, tccordZ, etc. It might be more productive to show that version of the code and figure out why you were getting seg faults. –  Jim Lewis Nov 14 '13 at 0:11
    
sizeof(char) == 1 byte in C. By definition. –  zubergu Nov 14 '13 at 0:14

2 Answers 2

A couple of thoughts and guesses.
First, as I mentioned before, sizeof(char) is always 1 byte in C, it's actually standard byte definition in C. So remove those as completely unnecessary and hard to read.

Back to the main problem.
You never use array of chars bigger than 8, so just make it statically 8 bytes long. If you have to call you function 15k times, that will save you tons of time(malloc takes time to allocate memory for you).

Given information from the question I guess your segfault was the cause of not initialising memory you allocated with malloc or reserved for auto char [8] with its declaration
1. You allocate (or 2nd version - declare 8-byte array) 8 bytes. It works fine. But you get 8 bytes full of trash here.

2. You copy 7 bytes from your list. And that's fine, too. But you forget to NULL terminate, so if you try to print it out back, you get segfault.EDIT If it works then probably you got lucky, because it shouldn't.

Solution
Replace char * witch char [8], remove all mallocs and frees corresponding to those char *, null terminate all your char[8] after strcpy, strncpy, or memcpy (whatever your choice is, depending on how confident you are that your data in list is correct) data to them.

Check your code with valgrind before further use, too.

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It's surprising you saying this function worked for you. From what I see from your code I had a lot of memory leaks to begin with because non of those 8-byte mallocs was ever fried.

The second thing is that it looks like you're allocating array of CoordNode before knowing the actual number of data records to parse. I added proper numofRes calculation before allocation.

Since you don't modify input data you don't actually need all those mallocs and memcpy's, you can use crdRow in strtod() immediatly, assuming it has char * type.

The last thing: it's generally a bad practice to do allocation in one place and freeing data in another. So it's better you free your headCoord_node structure in a place where it was allocated, after parsing it. The decision of freeing t depends on how addCoordData(t) treats its parameter.

void parseCrdList()
{
    struct CoordNode *t;
    int i;

    // count number of records to parse
    numofRes = 0;
    ccur_node = headCoord_node->next;
    while (ccur_node != NULL)
    {
        numofRes++;
        ccur_node=ccur_node->next;
    }
    t=malloc(numofRes*sizeof(struct CoordNode));

    i=0;
    ccur_node = headCoord_node->next;
    while (ccur_node!=NULL)
    {     
        t[i].resNum=atoi(ccur_node->crdRow+26);
        t[i].coordX=strtod(ccur_node->crdRow+35,NULL);
        t[i].coordY=strtod(ccur_node->crdRow+43,NULL);
        t[i].coordZ=strtod(ccur_node->crdRow+51,NULL);
        strncpy(t[i].atomName,ccur_node->crdRow+17,4);
        ccur_node=ccur_node->next;
        i++;  
    }
    numofRes=i;
    addCoordData(t);
    //free(t); // <<< it depends on how addCoordData treats t
}
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