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This is a snippet of the code I am currently attempting to run:

int main()
{
    //Declare variables
    string userSentence = " ";
    string permanantUserSentence = " ";
    int spaceNumber = 0;
    int wordNumber = 0;
    int characterCount = 0;
    int reverseCount = 1;
    int posLastSpace = -1;
    int posSpace = 0;
    int reverseSpace = 0;
    int previousReverseSpace = 0;

    //Begin the loop
    while(userSentence != "quit" && userSentence != "q")
    {
        //Prompt the user for their sentence
        cout << "Enter command: ";
        getline(cin, userSentence);
        permanantUserSentence = userSentence;

        //Condition to make sure values are not calculated and printed for the quit conditions
        if(userSentence != "quit" && userSentence != "q")
        {

            //Find and print all of the words in reverse order
            cout << "\nIn Reverse Order: ";
            for(reverseCount = userSentence.length() - 1; reverseCount >= 0; reverseCount -= 1)
            {
                if(userSentence.substr(reverseCount, 1) == " ")
                {
                    cout << userSentence.substr(reverseCount, userSentence.length() - reverseCount);
                }
            }

            //Clear the input buffer and start a new line before the next iteration
            cout << endl;

The goal of this is to take in a string from the user called userSentence and then print every word to the user in the reverse order that they were given. For example, "Look out!" would become "out! Look". When this code is run it does not return anything for the reversed version of the string.

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6  
This is a very popular question on StackOverflow asked in many different programming languages. Why don't you take a look around? – nhgrif Nov 14 '13 at 3:00
1  
Start with the list of Related questions to the right of this one. --------->>>>>>>> You might also look into using a debugger to step through the code and figure out what's not working and why. – Ken White Nov 14 '13 at 3:02
    
This isn't exactly the same. But have a look stackoverflow.com/questions/17026740/… – SuvP Nov 14 '13 at 11:07

Use two nested loops. Declare a buffer inside the first loop. Read the input string from the rear using the internal loop. Add the read character to the front of the buffer. If the read character is a space, print the buffer and reset it.

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try putting each word on a stack, and printing out the stack like this "char *p = strtok(words, " ");" there the stuff in the " " is what splits up words, char *p is called an iterator,
and the words will print out in reverse order #include #include #include

using namespace std;

int main(void)
{
stack<string> mystack;
char words[] = "these are my words separated by spaces";
char *p = strtok(words, " ");
while( p )
{
    mystack.push(p);
    p = strtok(NULL, " ");
}

while( !mystack.empty() )
{
    cout << mystack.top() << " ";
    mystack.pop();
}
return 0;
}
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Something like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <functional>
#include <iterator>

// using own split
namespace bs {
    template< typename Container >
        void split( Container & c
                  , std::string const & line
                  , const std::string & del ) {
            std::string::size_type b( 0 );
            std::string::size_type pos( b );

            while ( pos < line.size() ) {
                pos = line.find_first_of( del, b );
                if ( pos != b ) {
                    c.push_back( line.substr( b, pos - b) );
                }
                b = pos + 1;
            }
        }
}

void reverse( std::string & line )
{
   using vec = std::vector< std::string >;
   vec v;

   bs::split( v, line, std::string( " ,." ) );
   v.erase( std::remove_if(
       v.begin()
       , v.end()
       , [&]( std::string & s ) {
            //bs::trim( s ); // trim if needed
            return s.empty();
      } )
      , v.end() );

   for ( vec::reverse_iterator it( v.rbegin() ), end( v.rend() );
         it != end; ++it ) std::cout << *it << " ";
   std::cout << std::endl;
}


int main() {
    std::string s( "some string   to, reverse" );
    reverse( s );
    std::string s2( "nothingtosplit" );
    reverse( s2 );
}

output:

reverse to string some 
nothingtosplit
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This can reverse a sentence:

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <sstream>

...

string sentenceYouHave;
istringstream stream(sentenceYouHave);

vector<string> words{istream_iterator<string>{stream},
                     istream_iterator<string>{});

reverse(words.begin(), words.end());

If you want to count anything, you have accumulate count and count_if standard algorithms also.

And with boost, a more elegant solution is here:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <boost/range/adaptors.hpp>
#include <boost/range/algorithm.hpp>
#include <boost/regex.hpp>

using namespace std;
namespace b = boost;
namespace ba = boost::adaptors;

using string_range = boost::iterator_range<std::string::const_iterator>;


struct submatch_to_string_range {
    typedef string_range result_type;

    template <class T>
    string_range operator()(T const & s) const {
        return string_range(s.first, s.second);
    }
};


int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {
    string sentence = "This is a sentence";
    auto words_aux =
    sentence |
    ba::tokenized(R"((\w+))") |
    ba::transformed(submatch_to_string_range{});

    vector<string_range> words(words_aux.begin(), words_aux.end());
    boost::reverse(words);
    for (auto const & word : words) {
        cout << word << endl;
    }
}
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Here is the code with problems:

if(userSentence.substr(reverseCount, 1) == " ")
{
  cout << userSentence.substr(reverseCount, userSentence.length() - reverseCount);
}

Each time when you find " ", you will output characters from position reverseCount located to the string end!

For example, if the input string is "Look out please!", first you will get " please!", next you get " out please!" not " out".

And because at the beginning of the string is not " ", you will never output the first word.

So, I think we can modify the code in this form, and it work well:

cout << "In Reverse Order: ";
size_t length = userSentence.length();
for(reverseCount = length - 1; reverseCount >= 0; reverseCount -= 1) {
  if(userSentence.substr(reverseCount, 1) == " ") {
    cout << userSentence.substr(reverseCount + 1, length - reverseCount) << " ";
    length = reverseCount - 1;
  }
}
// output the first words.
cout << userSentence.substr(reverseCount + 1, length - reverseCount) << "\n";
cout << endl;

Hope this would be helpful for you.

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