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I have been reading concurrency in action and had a couple of questions.

public final class ThreeStooges {  

    private final Set<String> stooges = new HashSet<String>();  

    public ThreeStooges() {  
        stooges.add("Moe");  
        stooges.add("Larry");  
        stooges.add("Curly");  
    }  

    public boolean isStooge(String name) {  
        return stooges.contains(name);  
    }  
}  

The book says that since this class is immutable it is threadsafe since there is no modification of the state(stooges). What I'm confused on is this. What if multiple threads were to call the isStooge(String name) method simultaneously. What happens?

public class HolderObject{  

    private Holder holder;  

    public void initialize() {  
        holder = new Holder(42);  
    }  
}  

The book says this is not thread safe? Why? What does it mean it's not properly published?

public class Holder {  
    private int n;  

    public Holder(int n) { this.n = n; }  

    public void assertSanity() {  
        if (n != n)  
            throw new AssertionError("This statement is false.");  
    }  
}  

Same thing with this one. What's wrong with it? What if multiple threads call assertSanity().

Thank you guys

UPDATE

Let's say the stooges class is changed to the following...

public class ThreeStooges {  

private List<String> stooges = new ArrayList<String>();  

public ThreeStooges() {  
    stooges.add("Moe");  
    stooges.add("Larry");  
    stooges.add("Curly");  
}  

public synchronized void addStoog(String stoog){
         stooges.add(stoog);
}

public boolean getStoog(int index){
   return stooges.get(index);
}

public boolean isStooge(String name) {  
    return stooges.contains(name);  
}  
} 

Are there any thread problems here? Visibility problems on the getters? If thread A was to addStoog("Bobby") and Thread B calls getStoog(3), will that final stoog be visible on the getter?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What if multiple threads were to call the isStooge(String name) method simultaneously. What happens?

In Java's memory model, you get into trouble if two threads access the same data concurrently and at least one of them is a write. This is called a conflicting access.

In this example, you have multiple threads accessing the same data (the stooges variable), but none of them modifies the data, so you are fine.

The book says this is not thread safe? Why? What does it mean it's not properly published?

In this case however, you assign a new value to holder, which is a write. This is a data race, if two threads call initialize at the same time without external synchronization, bad things will happen.

The term 'published' most likely refers to how the change done in one thread becomes visible to other threads. Although I do not recognize this as a common term, so I guess the book should give an exact definition of the term at some point.

Same thing with this one. What's wrong with it? What if multiple threads call assertSanity().

As you have posted it, the code seems fine. Since assertSanity only reads n you do not have a data race.

However, as pointed out by @EnnoShioji's answer, there might be an issue where threads observe the uninitialized value of n and hence the seemingly trivial check might fail.

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One easy way to think about Java concurrency is the following:

  • Each Thread holds a copy of the variable.
  • If Java synchronization (volatile, locks,synchronized) is not used, the Thread might never go 'get' the new copy of the variable and in the case of 'set', it might never flush the value to main variable.

In your example, you force the 'setter' to get a lock on the object and flush the new value to main variable by using the synchronized keyword: synchronized void addStoog

On the other hand, you are not forcing the 'getters' to get a fresh copy of stooges, which will result in reading inconsistent data.

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I agree to the first two answer by @ComicSansMS, but I think his third answer doesn't address the book's original point.

That section of the book (Java Concurrency in Practice) is talking about Safe Publication. An object being immutable does not automatically mean it's free from concurrency problem (in this case, visibility problem). Even though the state of Holder is not changed during its lifetime, if it's accessed by a different thread without satisfying some rules, the other thread may see an object mid constructing, and hence see incorrect values.

Because when an object is constructed, the fields are first populated null/zero, in the third example (Holder), a thread could see n=0 and then n=42, and hence throw AssertionError.

That's what the book means when it says:

far worse, other threads could see an up to date value for the holder reference, but stale values for the state of the Holder

Had you had declared the int field as final however, the Holder object would have become a formally "immutable object" and thus the JMM would have guaranteed that such race condition wouldn't happen (see the paragraph about special guarantee on immutable objects). The book also describes other rules you can follow to prevent this from happening.

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Both of you guys were great help but I can't checkmark both. I also can't upvote because I have less than 15 rep. –  user1172490 Nov 14 '13 at 10:16
    
+1 And thanks for explaining the third example. One follow-up question here: Can this race still happen if there is a happens-before relation between the call to Holder's constructor and the call to the assertSanity member function? I'm asking because in general if you have races between the constructor finishing execution and calls to member functions, you usually have even bigger problems as the class invariants might not have been established when the member functions are executed. –  ComicSansMS Nov 14 '13 at 10:25
1  
I think as of Java 5 specification, the memory model has changed to allow the constructor to fully finish before other methods can be called. I don't know If I'm 100% right though. Expert needed here. –  user1172490 Nov 14 '13 at 10:34
    
@ComicSansMS: If I understand it correctly, if there is a happens-before relationship this race doesn't happen. I guess this race condition really only affect you if you are trying to do String#hashCode type optimization (exploiting the idempotency of an operation and rely on atomicity of the assignment of reference rather than using happens-before facilities like volatile), or in other words weird stuff. –  Enno Shioji Nov 14 '13 at 11:48

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