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I have the following code:

class Dog
  def initialize(attributes = {})
    attributes.each do |attr, value|
      send("#{attr}", value)
    end
  end
end


dog = Dog.new({:talk => 'bruuuf'})

And I get an block in initialize': undefined method `talk' for # (NoMethodError)

Isn't send supposed to be doing something like:

dog.talk = bruuuf Why is not letting me do so? Also, this would not set an instance variable, but it would create an instance method. Right?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure why you would use the send method to set instance variables in the first place, besides educational purpose or feeling adventurous. – MxyL Nov 14 '13 at 6:18
    
completely educational purposes. And isn't send used to do that? I've seen send("@#{key}", value) – Hommer Smith Nov 14 '13 at 6:19
1  
WHy somebody thinks this should be closed? – Hommer Smith Nov 14 '13 at 6:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted

First off: you cannot set instance variables with Object#send. Object#send sends messages, it doesn't set instance variables. Of course, you can send a message which may or may not then in turn invoke a method which may or may not in turn then set an instance variable, but that's not the doing of Object#send, it's the doing of whatever method was invoked in response to the message you sent.

If you want to dynamically set instance variables, use Object#instance_variable_set:

class Dog
  def initialize(**attrs)
    attrs.each do |attr, value|
      instance_variable_set(:"@#{attr}", value)
    end
  end
end

dog = Dog.new(talk: 'bruuuf')

In this case, however, it looks like you don't actually want to set an instance variable but rather call a setter method. Setter methods have names that end with an = sign, e.g. Dog#talk=:

class Dog
  def initialize(**attrs)
    attrs.each do |attr, value|
      send(:"#{attr}=", value)
    end
  end
end

dog = Dog.new(talk: 'bruuuf')

Note, of course, that this assumes that the method Dog#talk= actually exists. If it doesn't, you will get a NoMethodError.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome. I have just a couple of questions: Why (*) instead of just () in the arguments, and also, why writting :"#{attr}=" instead of "#{attr}" – Hommer Smith Nov 14 '13 at 17:23
    
1) Keyword arguments are new in Ruby 2.0, they just are a good fit for this particular use case. 2) send takes both Symbols and Strings, but again, Symbol is just a good fit for this particular data type. – Jörg W Mittag Nov 14 '13 at 19:00

Provided that method talk is defined, you can do send(:talk), but since talk is not defined, you cannot do that. Furthermore, dog.send(:talk) will not give you dog.talk = bruuuf. Provided that talk= is defined, dog.send(:talk=, ...) will do it.

share|improve this answer
    
So, is this used to set instance variables usually? – Hommer Smith Nov 14 '13 at 6:20
    
No, it is not used. – sawa Nov 14 '13 at 6:20
    
sawa, but the typical attributes.each do |attr, value| self.send("#{attr}=", value) end in an initialize method is used to send values to a setter that usually set instance variables, right? – Hommer Smith Nov 14 '13 at 6:24
    
No. Setter methods are usually defined through attr_setter. – sawa Nov 14 '13 at 6:50
    
@sawa This pattern is e.g. used in Rails to set attributes passed in the initializer to the model object (which then more or less just sets instance variables). Using this pattern instead of directly setting the instance variables allows users (i.e. child classes) to override the setter and to introduce new behavior. Depending on the actual use-case of the OP, this might be too much indirection though... – Holger Just Nov 14 '13 at 11:11

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