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Can anyone tell me how to insert large number of rows in Oracle ?

Using insert statement we can insert data into rows of table.

            insert into example values(1,'name','address');

Suppose I want to insert 100,000 rows , do I need to insert one by one by following above procedure? Or is there any other way to insert a large number of rows at a time? Can any one advise me with an example please.

Note: here i'm not asking copying data from another table.. just consider we have an XL sheet consist of 1,00,000 rows,then how we can insert them into a particular table..

Thanks, Sai.

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1  
where are your source rows located? –  be here now Nov 14 '13 at 7:02
2  
These days even one hundred thousand is not a large number of rows. A lot to type out, but not a lot to load. So you need to give us more details. Where is the source data now? Do you need to apply cleansing or validation routines? Is this a one-off exercise or a regular process? What is the Unit of Work? Which version and Edition of Oracle do you have? Any other constraints (e.g. directory permissions, ability to create database objects, etc)? –  APC Nov 14 '13 at 7:37
1  
My point is, Oracle has lots of different ways to bulk-load data. Different approaches suit different scenarios. –  APC Nov 14 '13 at 7:40

3 Answers 3

I suspect you have it in a CSV file.

  1. Create directory object
  2. Create external table. You can query external table the same way as regular table the difference is that the data in the table is from a file located in a directory object.

http://www.oracle-base.com/articles/9i/external-tables-9i.php

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Use sqlldr with the direct path option.

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If you are loading using individual insert statements from a script, using SQL*Plus, say, then one handy speed-up is to bunch sets of inserts into anonymous PL/SQL blocks ...

begin
  insert into example values(1,'name','address');
  insert into example values(1,'name','address');
  insert into example values(1,'name','address');
  ...
end;
/

begin
  insert into example values(1,'name','address');
  insert into example values(1,'name','address');
  insert into example values(1,'name','address');
  ...
end;
/

This reduces the client/server chatter enormously.

An original file can often be easily modified with unix scripts or macro in a decent text editor.

Not necessarily what you'd want to embed into a production process but handy for the occasional job.

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