Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently writing an App that needs the ability to modify and persist various pieces of data. I've decided to use Core Data for this purpose. When the user opens the Application for the first time I need to import a large amount of data from a sqlite database, this data consists of the many-to-many relationships.

I'd like to find out the best way to insert all of this data into my code data store. Right now I am using an NSOperation to do the import while that rest of the application remains active, so the user can do other things, but I'd like the import to happen as quickly as possible so the entire App can be accessed right away.

The method that I'm using now is to use an NSFetchRequest to attempt to find the related entity in the data store, if the entity is there I just add it as a relationship, if the entity is not there I create a new one and add it as a relationship. This works, but I feel that it is probably not even close to optimal.

The code I'm using now:

- (void)importEntitiesIntoContext: (NSManagedObjectContext*)managedObjectContext
{
    // Setup the database object
    static NSString* const databaseName = @"DBName.sqlite";
    NSString* databasePath = [[[NSBundle mainBundle] resourcePath] stringByAppendingPathComponent: databaseName];

    sqlite3* database;

    // Open the database from the user's filessytem
    if ( sqlite3_open_v2( [databasePath UTF8String], &database, SQLITE_OPEN_READONLY, NULL ) == SQLITE_OK ) 
    {
        // Setup the SQL Statement
        NSString* sqlStatement = [NSString stringWithFormat: @"SELECT some_columns FROM SomeTable;"];

        sqlite3_stmt* compiledStatement;
        if ( sqlite3_prepare_v2( database, [sqlStatement UTF8String], -1, &compiledStatement, NULL ) == SQLITE_OK ) 
        {
            // Create objects to test for existence of exercises
            NSPredicate* predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat: @"something == $SOME_NAME"];

            NSEntityDescription* entityDescription = [NSEntityDescription entityForName: @"SomeEntity" 
                                                                 inManagedObjectContext: managedObjectContext];
            NSFetchRequest* fetchRequest = [[[NSFetchRequest alloc] init] autorelease];
            [fetchRequest setEntity: entityDescription];

            // Loop through the results and add them to the feeds array
            while ( sqlite3_step( compiledStatement ) == SQLITE_ROW ) 
            {
                NSString* someName = [NSString stringWithCharsIfNotNull: (char*)sqlite3_column_text( compiledStatement, 1 )];
                NSPredicate* localPredicate = [predicate predicateWithSubstitutionVariables: 
                                               [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObject: someName
                                                                           forKey: @"SOME_NAME"]];
                [fetchRequest setPredicate: localPredicate];

                NSError* fetchError;
                NSArray* array = [managedObjectContext executeFetchRequest: fetchRequest 
                                                                     error: &fetchError];
                if ( array == nil )
                {
                    // handle error
                }
                else if ( [array count] == 0 )
                {
                    SomeEntity* entity = 
                    [NSEntityDescription insertNewObjectForEntityForName: @"SomeEntity"
                                                  inManagedObjectContext: managedObjectContext];
                    entity.name = someName;

// **here I call a method that attempts to add the relationships(listed below)**

                }
                else
                {
                    // Some entity already in store
                }

            }
        }
        else
        {
            NSLog( @"sqlStatement failed: %@", sqlStatement );
        }

        // Release the compiled statement from memory
        sqlite3_finalize( compiledStatement );
    }

    // All the data has been imported into this temporary context, now save it
    NSError *error = nil;
    if ( ![managedObjectContext save: &error] ) 
    {
        NSLog( @"Unable to save %@ - %@", [error localizedDescription] );
    }
}

Method to add the relationships:

- (void)setRelationshipForEntity: (Entity*)entity 
            inManagedObjectContext: (NSManagedObjectContext*)managedObjectContext 
                     usingDatabase: (sqlite3*)database
                        entityId: (NSNumber*)entityId
{

    // Setup the SQL Statement and compile it for faster access
    NSString* sqlStatement = [NSString stringWithFormat: @"SELECT Relationship.name FROM Relationship JOIN Entitys_Relationship ON Entitys_Relationship.id_Relationship = Relationship.id JOIN Entitys ON Entitys_Relationship.id_Entitys = Entitys.id WHERE Entitys.id = %d;", [entityId integerValue]];

    sqlite3_stmt* compiledStatement;
    if ( sqlite3_prepare_v2( database, [sqlStatement UTF8String], -1, &compiledStatement, NULL ) == SQLITE_OK ) 
    {
        // Create objects to test for existence of relationship
        NSPredicate* predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat: @"relationshipName == $RELATIONSHIP_NAME"];

        NSEntityDescription* entityDescription = [NSEntityDescription entityForName: @"EntityRelationship" 
                                                             inManagedObjectContext: managedObjectContext];
        NSFetchRequest* fetchRequest = [[[NSFetchRequest alloc] init] autorelease];
        [fetchRequest setEntity: entityDescription];

        while ( sqlite3_step( compiledStatement ) == SQLITE_ROW ) 
        {
            NSString* relationshipName = [NSString stringWithCharsIfNotNull: (char*)sqlite3_column_text( compiledStatement, 0 )];
            NSPredicate* localPredicate = [predicate predicateWithSubstitutionVariables: 
                                           [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObject: relationshipName
                                                                       forKey: @"RELATIONSHIP_NAME"]];
            [fetchRequest setPredicate: localPredicate];

            NSError* fetchError;
            NSArray* array = [managedObjectContext executeFetchRequest: fetchRequest 
                                                                 error: &fetchError];
            if ( array == nil )
            {
                // handle error
            }
            else if ( [array count] == 0 )
            {
                EntityRelationship* entityRelationship = 
                [NSEntityDescription insertNewObjectForEntityForName: @"EntityRelationship"
                                              inManagedObjectContext: managedObjectContext];
                entityRelationship.relationshipName = relationshipName;

                [entity addRelationshipObject: entityRelationship];
                //NSLog( @"Inserted relationship named %@", relationshipName );
            }
            else
            {
                [entity addRelationship: [NSSet setWithArray: array]];
            }
        }
    }
    else
    {
        NSLog( @"slqStatement failed: %@", sqlStatement );
    }

    // Release the compiled statement from memory
    sqlite3_finalize( compiledStatement );  
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Where is the original database coming from?

Typically, you would convert all your data to Core Data during development and then ship the app with a pre-populated Core Data store (no need for a user to wait for an import).

share|improve this answer
    
the information is in a sqlite database, the user will be able to change the information on their personal device, but for App updates the data will need to be merged with new data. –  jessecurry Jan 4 '10 at 17:54
    
I would still have it so that the merge was between a user's Core Data store on the device and the app's updated initial Core Data store, but that's because I prefer working with Core Data. –  gerry3 Jan 4 '10 at 18:05
    
What method do you typically use to create the initial CoreData store? –  jessecurry Jan 5 '10 at 0:26
    
I am going to make a simple mac app using the same data model to do the import and save the initial Core Data SQLite file. Then, I will add that file to the iPhone app project. On first run, it will copy over as the user's Core Data file. For upgrades, yet another Core Data file of updated objects will be added and checked one by one so as to not overwrite objects with user updates. My import is via a JSON response from a web application because we have all of our data in a web database. You should use whatever makes the most sense--it sounds like your import will be from a SQLite database. –  gerry3 Jan 5 '10 at 2:59
1  
What method do you use to check the objects in order to prevent overwrites? That's the main question that I had. Are you basically doing what I am doing above, or do you have a better method? –  jessecurry Jan 6 '10 at 22:24

Apple has some suggestions on how to optimize large imports into a Core Data store:

  • Disable the undo-manager during batch import
  • Don't insert record-by-record - Create batches of size n (depending on record size)
  • Use a local autorelease pool and drain it after each batch

See the documentation for the details.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.