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I have to write a simple program in C that prints to the standard output triangle with two equal edges for given number n. Meaning that for n=3 the output would be:

x

xx

xxx

Now I'm supposed to do two version of this program: 1. Memory conservative. 2. Time conservative.

Now I'm not entirely sure, but I think that the first version would just print x one at a time, and the second would expand the char table one at a time and then print it.

But is printing a char* faster than printing multiple single chars?

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4  
Have you tested it yourself? – squiguy Nov 14 '13 at 9:34
    
Now I actually did. For the task of printing a triangle with length of 1000 one character at a time took 46 second, and with a string it took measly 8. – Arek Krawczyk Nov 14 '13 at 10:00
1  
I didn't mean to be snide, it's just people here really appreciate a question that has given a full effort beforehand. Whether that means providing code or tests, it really will help here. Cheers! – squiguy Nov 14 '13 at 10:09
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You may not be able to observe but building the entire string in memory and then printing it at once is definitely faster in theory. Reason being you will be making less calls to printf function. Each time you call a function there are multiple things that happen in the background like pushing all the current method variables and current location to stack and popping them back after returning.

However as I mentioned you may not be able to observe this difference for smaller inputs because the time needed for each of these operations are small unless you use a computer from 1960s.

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