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I have a lot of C# Code that I have to write in C++. I don't have much experience in C++.

I am using Visual Studio 2012 to build. The project is an Static Library in C++ (not in C++/CLI).

I am creating some UnitTests, in the C# version, they have a class TestData, a number of static instaces of TestData and a static Initialize method, that sets values to those static instances.

When I try to the same in C++ I found that if my Initialize method is declared inside the TestData class, it doesnt work. but if I declare it outside, it works.

C++ (Test)

TEST_CLASS(UnitTest1)
{
public:
    TEST_CLASS_INITIALIZE(ClassInitialize)
    {
        TestData::Initialize();
    }

    TEST_METHOD(TestMethod1)
    {
        Assert::AreEqual(data0.testValue, 30);          
    }
};

C++ (Initialize method inside TestData class):

The test fails with the Initialize method declared like this. When I debug I see the testValue being set, but when it reaches the Asset is back to 0.

//.h
namespace Data
{
    class TestData
    {
    public:
        TestData(void);
        ~TestData(void);

    int testValue;

        static void Initialize();       
    };

    static TestData data0 = TestData();
}


    //.cpp
namespace Data
{
    TestData::TestData(void){}
    TestData::~TestData(void){}

    void TestData::Initialize()
    {
        data0.testValue = 30;
    }
}

C++ (Initialize method declared outside the class):

With the code like this my test works.

    //.h
namespace Data
{
    class TestData
    {
    public:
        TestData(void);
        ~TestData(void);
        int testValue;      
    };

static TestData data0 = TestData();

    static void Initialize()
    {
        data0.testValue = 30;
    }
}

Why is this happening?

Update:

Following Hans' advice I tracked the address of the variables being used. It helped me notice, that for some reason the constructor for TestData is being called twice. I don't know why. I thought that maybe the automatic allocation was being called, so I added an int parameter to the constructor, to see what would happen, and it seems it calls the constructor for data0 twice.

When my test doesn't work (having Initialize inside the class) the calling order is:

  1. TestData (data0) Constructor (Address: 1)
  2. TestData (data0) Constructor (Address: 2)
  3. Initialize: uses data0 with Address 1
  4. Test: uses data0 with Address 2

When my test works (having initialze outside the class) the calling order is:

  1. TestData (data0) Constructor (Address: 1)
  2. TestData (data0) Constructor (Address: 2)
  3. Initialize: uses data0 with Address 2
  4. Test: uses data0 with Address 2

Now I understand why my test is failing. But I don't get why the constructor is called twice, and why in one case both instances are used, and in the other case only the second instance is being used.

share|improve this question
    
Google "static initialization order fiasco". And use debugger breakpoints. –  Hans Passant Nov 14 '13 at 15:06
    
Hi @HansPassant, I didn't know about the "static initialization order fiasco". I am not sure if applies in this case, because I am using the functionalities for the tests of Microsoft (unless tests are considered static?). When I debug, the debugger stops first in the Constructor of my class, and then goes to the Initialize method and then it goes to the test method. In the Initialize method it is setting the value, but in the test method is not set any more. –  Dzyann Nov 14 '13 at 16:15
    
You'll next need to learn the & operator, useful in the debugger to see the address of a variable so you can be sure that the code is using the exact same variable. And data breakpoints, useful to debug memory corruption. –  Hans Passant Nov 14 '13 at 16:20
    
@HansPassant, I didn't think of using the & operator. I just did as you said, and I found out that there is 2 instances being created for TestData, I don't understand why. I added more details in my question. –  Dzyann Nov 14 '13 at 16:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Actually I think the problem has nothing to do with whether the Initialize function is defined inside or outside the Class. It is because the global variable data0 and the function definition are not in the same file.

The static construct in c++ has another meaning with a global variable, which means the variable is only visible in the current file.

You define 'static TestData data0 = TestData()' in the header file, and include it in the cpp implementation file. And I guess you also include it in a test cpp file, which cause the header file to be included twice. So there are actually two instances of data0.

When Debugging the code, you see the 'data0' in the implementation file was set to 30, but in fact the 'data0' in the test file was not touched.

Try the codes below, and it should work correctly.

.h
class TestData
{
public:
    TestData(void);
    ~TestData(void);

    int testValue;

    static void Initialize();       
};

extern TestData data0;

//.cpp
TestData data0 = TestData();
TestData::TestData(void){}
TestData::~TestData(void){}

void TestData::Initialize()
{
    data0.testValue = 30;
}

The codes above only declare TestData data0 in the header file(extern means the variable is defined somewhere else), and define it in the cpp file. So in this case there is only one instance of data0.

share|improve this answer
    
I used your code and it works. As you say now the constructor of TestData is called only once. Is using extern the only way I can achieve this? I guess in this case having "staic" is not needed because as you say it is a Global Variable. Wil my variable be instantiated once per file that includes the h file then? Do you always avoid this problem by using extern? I need my h file to be included in both cpp files. –  Dzyann Nov 14 '13 at 17:00
1  
The variable will not be instantiated multiple times as long as it is declared with extern. It is sort of a best practice that do not define variables in h file, use extern to declare it and define it in a cpp file only once. Then all the other cpp files which include the h file will find the instance variable in that cpp file, instead of instantiating again. Maybe you should try to understand the difference between declaration and definition in c++, C# does not have that issue. –  benjamin_t Nov 14 '13 at 17:14

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