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I have an ordered list of entities. Each entity has an int UniqueKey property.

I want the list to go through a transformation whereby the UniqueKey values are made unique (assuming that there are duplicates). This is done by finding duplicates and progressively incrementing them.

Step-by-step Process:

  1. Start at index 1 (I am using zero-based indexing)
  2. If any previous elements have the same UniqueId value, increment the value at the current index.
  3. Repeat (2) until no previous elements have the same UniqueId
  4. Move one element to the right

For example, { 1, 1, 1, 3, 3, 8 } would go through the following steps:

  1. { 1, 2, 1, 3, 3, 8 } : Index 1 incremented
  2. { 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 8 } : Index 2 incremented
  3. { 1, 2, 3, 3, 3, 8 } : Index 2 incremented again
  4. { 1, 2, 3, 4, 3, 8 } : Index 3 incremented
  5. { 1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 8 } : Index 4 incremented
  6. { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 } : Index 4 incremented again

The code below performs the above-mentioned algorithm in a very procedural manner:

entities = entities.OrderBy(x => x.UniqueId);

foreach (var entity in entities)
{
    var leftList = entities.Take(entities.IndexOf(entity));

    while (leftList.Any(x => x.UniqueId == entity.UniqueId))
    {
        entity.UniqueId++;
    }
}

Question: Is it possible to implement this in LINQ?

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1  
Why would you want to implement this in LINQ? I think your algorithm is clear in its current shape. You can definitely speed it up (which would reduce readability), but using LINQ is more likely to make this algorithm both slower and less readable. LINQ should not be your golden hammer... –  Vincent van der Weele Nov 14 '13 at 14:50
1  
Do you have to use this exact algorithm, or can you use any algorithm that results in all of the IDs being made unique? If one wanted to use LINQ, there are better ways of giving each item a unique id. –  Servy Nov 14 '13 at 14:58
1  
You shouldn't use LINQ for tasks which have non-query semantics. Just use imperative code, it will be both clearer and simpler. –  Vlad Nov 14 '13 at 15:19
    
Why go through all this work? Why not just turn {1, 1, 1, 2} into {1, 2, 3, 4} ? –  Jonas Elfström Nov 14 '13 at 15:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Technically yes:

var indexedEntities =
   entities.Select((e, i) => new { Entity = e, Index = i })
           .ToList();

indexedEntities.ForEach(ie =>
   ie.Entity.UniqueId =
      indexedEntities.Any(prev => prev.Index < ie.Index)
     && ie.Entity.UniqueId
        <= indexedEntities.TakeWhile(prev => prev.Index < ie.Index)
                          .Max(prev => prev.Entity.UniqueId)
        ? indexedEntities.TakeWhile(prev => prev.Index < ie.Index)
                         .Max(prev => prev.Entity.UniqueId) + 1
        : ie.Entity.UniqueId);

var result = indexedEntities.Select(ie => ie.Entity);

Though please, for the love of everything sacred in IT, don't, just don't :)

share|improve this answer
    
You should replace the Wheres you have with TakeWhile –  Servy Nov 14 '13 at 15:01
    
@Servy You really thought about optimizing this monstrosity? Fair enough, updated :) –  decPL Nov 14 '13 at 15:03

You algorithm could be simplify a lot. Just iterate over, and if an Id is lower than the previous, increment it by one. No Linq, no O(n^2), just O(n):

{ 1, 2, 1, 3, 3, 8 } : Index 1 incremented
{ 1, 2, 3, 3, 3, 8 } : Index 2 incremented
{ 1, 2, 3, 4, 3, 8 } : Index 3 incremented
{ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 } : Index 4 incremented

entities = entities.OrderBy(x => x.UniqueId).ToList();
for(int index = 1; index < entities.Count; index++)
{
    int previous = entities[index - 1].UniqueId;
    if (previous >= entities[index].UniqueId)
    {
        entities[index].UniqueId = previous + 1;
    }
}
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This doesn't follow your algorithm faithfully, but it might give you the result you want. Essentially compare each element with the next, and increment the latter's Id to be one more than the former's.

entities.OrderBy(e => e.Id)
    .Aggregate((e1, e2) => { if (e1.Id >= e2.Id) { e2.Id = e1.Id + 1; } return e2; });
share|improve this answer
    
this does nothing - you're first doing an OrderBy and then doing anything only if previous element is greater than the next one. Any chance you meant >= instead of >? –  decPL Nov 14 '13 at 15:01
    
Yes - thanks :-) –  Rob Nov 14 '13 at 15:04
    
@Rob: Oh, Aggregate, my fault, sorry. You are right. –  Vlad Nov 14 '13 at 15:27

If you are desperate for a linq solution why not just use the index as the id.

entities.OrderBy(x => x.UniqueId).Select((x,i) => {
                                                     x.UniqueId = i;
                                                     return x;
                                                  }).ToArray();           
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