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Quick question - How to access "two levels above" properties? Testing example in TypeScript:

export class Test {
    testVariable: string;
    constructor() { }

    TestFunction() {
        MyFunctions.Proxy.Join() { //some made up function from other module
            //HERE
            //How can I here access testVariable property of Test class?
        }
    }
}

Or is it even possible to access such a properties in TypeScript (or JavaScript in general)?

Edit + answer: As my question was not clear enough I bring some new info about this issue. It is very commonly asked question by starting programmers.

Issue here is that this changes its context - firstly it refers to class Test, then it refers to my inner function - Join(). To achieve correctness we have to either use lambda expressions for inner function call or use some substitute value for this.

First solution is in the accepted answer.

Second is this:

export class Test {
    testVariable: string;
    constructor() { }

    TestFunction() {
        var myClassTest: Test = this;
        MyFunctions.Proxy.Join() { //some made up function from other module
            myClassTest.testVariable; //approaching my class propery in inner function through substitute variable
        }
    }
}
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closed as unclear what you're asking by Ryan Cavanaugh, Qantas 94 Heavy, Flow, David, Dan Nov 15 '13 at 12:42

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Your syntax isn't valid to begin with, so it's hard to tell what you're trying to do. Unless you have access to the instance variable that contains the property you need, you can't walk the parent chain, unless you have properties created that would allow you to do that. –  WiredPrairie Nov 14 '13 at 15:17
    
Sorry, it was my bad. I gave just a test example and didn't notice its not valid. My point was simply if I can approach properties (some variables) that are two levels above my function = using "this" keyword would lead to my above-function and not to the class. –  OutOfSpaceHoneyBadger Nov 15 '13 at 7:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you use fat-arrow syntax, it will preserve your lexical scope:

export class Test {
    testVariable: string;
    constructor() { }

    TestFunction() {
        var MyFunctions = {
            Proxy: {
                Join: function() {}
            }
        };

        MyFunctions.Proxy.Join = () => {
            alert(this.testVariable);
        }
    }
}
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