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Story is: I have to make a class for my programming class and my custom project (Space Marine - yeah, I'm a bit of a fan) is in progress. But I found a problem I just can't simply solve. Here are some codes that I think are important:

HEADER

class SpaceMarine
{

public:
...
    SpaceMarine(); // default constructor
    SpaceMarine(std::string name, 
                unsigned int rang, 
                Statystyki& stats, 
                std::auto_ptr<Pancerz> armor, Bron& weapon);

private:

    std::string name_;
    unsigned int ranga_;
    Statystyki* stats_;
    std::auto_ptr<Pancerz> armor_;
    Bron* weapon_;
    Experience experience_;

just to make it clear : "Statystyki", "Pancerz" and "Bron" are classes that are members of main class SpaceMarine. Project requirements: I have to make one smart pointer (here as auto_ptr).

.CPP

SpaceMarine::SpaceMarine()
{
    name_ = "John";
    stats_ = new Statystyki();
    weapon_ = new Bron(); 
    std::auto_ptr<Pancerz> armor_(new Pancerz());


   ranga_ = 0;
}
SpaceMarine::SpaceMarine(std::string name, 
                         unsigned int rang, 
                         Statystyki& stats, 
                         std::auto_ptr<Pancerz> armor, Bron& weapon) 
: armor_(std::move(armor))
{
    name_ = name;
    ranga_ = rang;
    stats_ = stats;
    armor_ = std::move(armor);
    weapon_ = weapon;
}

Now, where the problem begins: This is the part of "main.cpp" file:

SpaceMarine SM1;
SpaceMarine SM2("Azrael", 3, S2, **P2** , B2);

// S - Stats, P - armor, B-weapon class

There is problem with this little thingy, called P2, which should be an auto_ptr to armor. I have armor object P2 declared previously. I have problem "merging" auto_ptr into my constructor. Any ideas?

Also, all advices about improving my code are welcome :)

Matt

Ps. My first post here! :D Go easy on me ^^

EDIT

Thanks to user1158692 for tidying my code Thanks to Hansmaad and user1158692 I wish I could make both your answers right for this probleme, as both helped me to deal with it ;)

Here's the final code for future refrence:

HEADER

SpaceMarine(std::string name, 
            unsigned int rang, 
            Statystyki& stats, 
            Pancerz& armor, 
            Bron& weapon);

.CPP

SpaceMarine(std::string name, 
            unsigned int rang, 
            Statystyki& stats, 
            Pancerz& armor, 
            Bron& weapon);

{
    name_ = name;
    ranga_ = rang;
    stats_ = &stats;
    std::unique_ptr<Pancerz> armor_(&armor);
    weapon_ = &weapon;
} 

// and example of declaring it in main.cpp

Bron B2("Chainsword" , 0, 6);

Pancerz P2("Power armor", 12);

Statystyki S2(6,6,4,8,20);

SpaceMarine SM2("Azrael", 3, S2, P2 , B2);
share|improve this question
    
I highly recommend using a proper smart pointer (like std::unique_ptr) in C++11 (which you evidently use from the move call). Even before that, there's still Boost's. You're also not initializing or setting your smart pointer data member in the default constructor. It's a good idea to use constructor initializer lists. You're also assigning plain objects to pointers and currently have no need to take them by non-const reference. –  chris Nov 14 '13 at 14:39
1  
std::auto_ptr is deprecated in C++11 because it has weird copy semantics, as suggested by chris you should really use std::unique_ptr. –  Jack Nov 14 '13 at 14:44
    
Well you move the contents of the auto_ptr argument into your member variable auto_ptr twice - once in the initialiser list and once in the constructor body. The second time you do it, the source will be in a "null" state from the time before so will wipe out the destination member variable. –  Grimm The Opiner Nov 14 '13 at 14:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can just pass a auto_ptr to your constructor. It will transfer ownership to the copy. However, std::auto_ptr is deprecated and should be replaced by std::unique_ptr.

struct A {};
struct B 
{
    std::auto_ptr<A> a;
    B(std::auto_ptr<A> a) : a(a)
    {      
    }
};

struct C
{
    std::unique_ptr<A> a;
    C(std::unique_ptr<A> a) : a(std::move(a))
    {
    }
};

int main()
{
    std::auto_ptr<A> a{ new A };
    B b{ a };

    C c{ std::make_unique<A>() };
}
share|improve this answer

If the armor object is to share the lifetime of the SpaceMarine (and the smart pointer suggests it is) then why is it on the heap at all, not the stack?

Still, if that's the way you're going then consider defining the class and constructor like this (some parameters and so on left out for brevity)::

Declaration:

class SpaceMarine
{
public:
    SpaceMarine(Pancerz* armor);
private:
    std::unique_ptr<Pancerz> armor_;
};

Implementation:

SpaceMarine::SpaceMarine( Panzerc* armor )
: armor_(armor)
{
}

Called like:

SpaceMarine obj( new Panzerc() );

or

Panzerc* ptr = new Panzerc();
.   
.
SpaceMarine obj( ptr );
share|improve this answer

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