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I have recently started looking at GUAVA's collections, namely ImmutableList and that seems rather cumbersome (with the builder instance etc.) Is there a library that would mimic a more "natural" way of how the collections should behave (scala's http://www.scala-lang.org/api/current/index.html#scala.collection.immutable.List is one example). I would like something that allows addition/removal etc. but preserving immutability and, perhaps for the purpose of performance, reuses parts of old list.

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I would like something that allows addition/removal etc. but preserving immutability is a contradiction. By definition, you can't add to or remove from an immutable list. –  gla3dr Nov 14 '13 at 15:29
    
I don't get how an ImmutableList could allow addition/removal. What's wrong with using regular ArrayLists, and using ImmutableList.copyOf() when you want an immutable copy? –  JB Nizet Nov 14 '13 at 15:29
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Since you know what you want, create your own "immutable" collections library. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Nov 14 '13 at 15:30
    
What do you want to be immutable? The collection or the objects within? If it's the collection, how can you add/remove items? –  NickJ Nov 14 '13 at 15:35
    
Then the cons operator :: in Scala/Haskell, obviously are against the immutability then? Or append operator in scala on immutable.List i.e. :+ ? –  Bober02 Nov 14 '13 at 21:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understand you correctly, you want an immutable list that has convenient add/remove methods that return new list instances that reuse as much of the original list structure as possible. You could do something like this:

public abstract class ImmutableList<T> implements Iterable<T> {
    /**
     * Adds an element to the head of the list, returning the new list.
     *
     * @param o The element to be added to the list.
     * @return The list consisting of the element <var>o</var> followed by
     *         this list.
     */
    public final ImmutableList<T> add(final T o) {
        return new Node<>(o, this);
    }

    /**
     * Removes the element <var>o</var> resulting in a new list which
     * is returned to the caller.
     *
     * @param o The object to be removed from the list.
     * @return A list consisting of this list with object <var>o</var> removed.
     */
    public abstract ImmutableList<T> remove(final T o);

    public abstract boolean isEmpty();
    public abstract int size();

    public abstract boolean contains(final T o);

    private ImmutableList() {}

    /**
     * Returns a "standard" enumeration over the elements of the list.
     */
    public Iterator<T> iterator() {
        return new NodeIterator<>(this);
    }

    /**
     * The empty list.  Variables of type ImmutableList should be
     * initialised to this value to create new empty lists.
     */
    private static final ImmutableList<?> EMPTY = new ImmutableList<Object>() {
        @Override
        public ImmutableList<Object> remove(final Object o) {
            return this;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean isEmpty() {
            return true;
        }

        @Override
        public int size() {
            return 0;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean contains(final Object o) {
            return false;
        }
    };

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public static <T> ImmutableList<T> empty() {
        return (ImmutableList<T>)EMPTY;
    }

    public static <T> ImmutableList<T> create(final T head) {
        return new Node<>(head, ImmutableList.<T>empty());
    }

    static class Node<T> extends ImmutableList<T> {
        private final int _size;

        private Node(final T element, final ImmutableList<T> next) {
            _element = element;
            _next = ArgumentHelper.verifyNotNull(next, "next");
            _size = next.size() + 1;
        }

        public ImmutableList<T> remove(final T old) {
            if (_element == old) {
                return _next;
            }
            else {
                final ImmutableList<T> n = _next.remove(old);
                if (n == _next) {
                    return this;
                }
                else {
                    return new Node<>(_element, n);
                }
            }
        }

        @Override
        public boolean isEmpty() {
            return false;
        }

        @Override
        public int size() {
            return _size;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean contains(final T o) {
            return Objects.equals(_element, o) || _next.contains(o);
        }

        private final T _element;
        private final ImmutableList<T> _next;
    }

    private class NodeIterator<T> implements Iterator<T> {
        private ImmutableList<T> _current;

        private NodeIterator(final ImmutableList<T> head) {
            _current = ArgumentHelper.verifyNotNull(head, "head");
        }

        public boolean hasNext() {
            return !_current.isEmpty();
        }

        public T next() {
            final T result = ((Node<T>)_current)._element;
            _current = ((Node<T>)_current)._next;
            return result;
        }

        public void remove() {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }
    }
}

For this implementation, a new list is build by adding item(s) to ImmutableList.empty().

Note that this is not a particularly wonderful implementation; new elements are appended to the beginning of the list, as opposed to the end. But perhaps this will give you an idea of where to start.

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There is an ImmutableArrayList (and other immutable collections) in Goldman Sachs Collection library

See ImmutableArrayList.java, methods newWith(T t) and newWithout(T t)

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Your requirements show you misunderstood the purpose of these tools. An immutable list always needs a builder because it must not change after the constructor has been called. That's the whole purpose of immutables. They don't change, ever. There is no "setup stage."

If you don't need that, simply wrap your existing list in Collections.unmodifiableList().

The drawback is, of course, that someone might keep a reference to the original list and modify it. Or a hacker might peek into the wrapper, get the underlying list and start to mess with it.

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It's possible to have an useful immutable list type without a builder if, given an instance of the list, one may efficiently produce a new instance which contains additional content. With some immutable types, building a list with repeated calls to myList = myList.PlusItem(newItem); could be an O(N^2) or even O(N^3) operation, but with some other types such code will execute in time O(N). Note that types with lazily-evaluated fields may be particularly useful for this (e.g. a "list" type might hold a reference to a list with all but the last item, along with the last item, but... –  supercat Nov 14 '13 at 18:56
    
...also hold fields with more information that could be used to look up earlier items in the list. If many items are added and before any look-ups are required, it may be fastest to start by simply building a linked list while things are being added, and then fill in the other fields if and when they're actually needed. –  supercat Nov 14 '13 at 18:59
    
@supercat: True. Just remember: For each item of the linked list, you need to pay a high price: Allocate memory. Compared to changing a pointer in a preallocated array, this is is very, very expensive. If you just create a list of immutables (like Strings), your approach is total overkill. I just wished that compilers and VMs would be smart enough to give me a single API to write my code and then decide themselves which approach to use. –  Aaron Digulla Nov 15 '13 at 9:08
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I wouldn't expect a compiler to be able to totally figure out such things itself, since that would require that compilers be able to predict what outside code will want to do with a data structure, but I would like to see a language which can efficiently distinguish between persistable and ephemeral reference types, and can let an object know whether more than one persistable reference has ever existed to it. If only one reference exists to an object, mutating the object will be equivalent to making a copy which has the change applied, but may be much faster. –  supercat Nov 15 '13 at 15:53
    
Presently, code wanting to encapsulate a value which is too complicated to represent in a fixed group of primitives must either hold a reference to an object which will always encapsulate the same value, or else hold the only persistent reference to an object it can mutate at will. I'd like to see compiler support for three styles: (1) immutable object; (2) persistent reference which the compiler won't let be persisted elsewhere, or (3) a pair of references which would be used together to implement a pessimistic "copy on write" strategy [so that either 1 or 2 could be used... –  supercat Nov 15 '13 at 15:58

Immutable means the one that doesn't change, so the answer is no. You can't mutate an immutable list (whoa!). The builder that's shipped with list utilities is good as long as you just want to initialize the list with some content and leave it with them, so I'd suggest you to review your app's architecture.

About the reusing parts of old list - if the list is mutable, than, by mutating it you are risking with the immutability of state of the list from which the current one was derived. But, if the instances are both immutable, you actually do refer to the previous list because you can reuse its parts as long as it doesn't change, and immutable items don't ever change.

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Even though objects of type string are immutable, it is common to regard variables of type string as being mutable strings, rather than as holding references to immutable strings. Given string X="Fred"; X+="erick";, the second statement will generate an entirely new string "Frederick"` independent from the "Fred" to which X had previously held a reference, and store a reference to that, but semantically, after the first statement X encapsulated the character sequence "Fred", and afterward it encapsulated the sequence "Frederick"; the second statement thus changed... –  supercat Nov 14 '13 at 17:56
    
...the character sequence encapsulated by X. Java doesn't allow any class types other than String to use the same sort of syntax, but code which takes a variable that encapsulates a set of items, and changes it so that it encapsulate a set with more items, effectively changes the set of items encapsulated by that variable. That the variable will hold a reference to a different object is essentially an implementation detail. –  supercat Nov 14 '13 at 18:01
    
@supercat Yeah, I thought about something like this to mention, but since I'm using Scala, I'm accustomed to variables being both final (i.e. no reassignments) and immutable, so I just forgot the other way it can be. I should admit that I was not totally correct here. –  cdshines Nov 14 '13 at 18:27
    
I'm not familiar with Scala or Guava, but in Java and .NET languages, even though a class may encapsulate mutable state in a mutable variable which references an immutable object, an immutable variable which owns a mutable object to which other "views" (references) may exist, or a variable [which may or may not be mutable] which holds the only reference to a mutable object, or various other ways, there's no way to indicate declaratively which usage pattern applies to a particular variable. Unfortunate, IMHO, since one can't write correct code without knowing which pattern applies where. –  supercat Nov 14 '13 at 18:44

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