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I've got this method that is passed an array of files. It then replaces any / with \\. Then I call a method and pass the array to it, which puts the argument into a new array, formats the itand returns the new array. Next, I call the same method again, pass it the same local array, format it differently, and out both arrays. Problem is, the second method call is retaining the format from the first method call.

    public void Verify(string[] svnFiles, out string[] local, out string[] build)
    {            
        //replace / with double \\
        var transformed = TransformToFolders(svnFiles);

        build = GetFiles(_buildPath, transformed);
        local = GetFiles(_localPath, transformed);
    }

    private static string[] GetFiles(string path, params string[] files)
    {
        var moddedFiles = files;
        for (var i = 0; i < files.Count(); i++)
            moddedFiles[i] = string.Format(@"{0}\{1}", path, moddedFiles[i]);

        return moddedFiles;
    }

So when I call local = GetFiles(_localPath, transformed); transformed has the same values as moddedFiles. GetFiles used to manipulate its files parameter directly and I was getting the same behavior, so that's why I tried creating a new array, but moddedFiles seems to still just be a reference instead of an actual copy. Is there an easy way to make an actual copy of it so that way I'm not getting basically _localPath\_buildPath\moddedFile?

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This is not related to your question but is a recommendation based on my personal experience. I have always got hurt in the eye when I used multiple out arguments. IMHO I consider that a bad pattern. Instead I create model classes with output values as properties and return that as the result of function. –  Aidin Nov 14 '13 at 16:44
    
Frankly I'm not a huge fan of it either, slowly working on refactoring this project I inherited. I will probably change it. I think it's ugly and hard to follow. Or at least, the full method is-- I had stripped it down to just the core essentials for this post. –  sab669 Nov 14 '13 at 16:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It sounds like you want:

var moddedFiles = (string[]) files.Clone();

That will create a shallow copy of the array, which is largely equivalent to a deep copy when it comes to strings, as they're immutable.

However, a cleaner (IMO) alternative would be to use LINQ:

private static string[] GetFiles(string path, params string[] files)
{
    return files.Select(file => string.Format(@"{0}\{1}", path, file))
                .ToArray();
}

Or if you really want to keep your original rough approach, you don't need to clone the array really - just create a new array of the right size.

private static string[] GetFiles(string path, params string[] files)
{
    var moddedFiles = new string[files.Length];
    for (var i = 0; i < files.Length; i++)
    {
        moddedFiles[i] = string.Format(@"{0}\{1}", path, files[i]);
    }
    return moddedFiles;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that did it. For some reason I didn't think I could cast it to a string array-- I just looking at Clone / MemberwiseClone. This worked, and I'll mark it in 10 minutes :) –  sab669 Nov 14 '13 at 16:30
    
@sab669: Have a look at my edit for a cleaner approach though :) –  Jon Skeet Nov 14 '13 at 16:32

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