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This is a homework and I'm not allowed to use loops or global variables.

Basically the function looks like

(defun pairs (1 4)

and makes a list like so (1 2 3 4) and finds all possible pairs, so it should return ((1 2) (1 3) (1 4) (2 3) (2 4) (3 4)). All the code I've tried don't give me all the pairings, usually resulting in just getting pairs from the start to the end, like (1 2) (2 3) (3 4). I'm also not sure if the base case should be when (= m n) or (= (1- m) n).

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closed as off-topic by Rainer Joswig, JB., Dukeling, zero323, Dan Nov 15 '13 at 12:44

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You might want to think about a double recursion –  mck Nov 14 '13 at 17:38
    
This question is accumulating some close votes because "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results." What have you tried so far? What didn't work about it? –  Joshua Taylor Nov 14 '13 at 20:08
    
You might want to split your task into separate problems. As you've phrased it, you first need to generate (1 2 3 4) from 1 and 4. That's one subproblem (and not a particularly hard one). After that, you'll need to construct the list of pairs from (1 2 3 4). Have you attempted or solved either of these? –  Joshua Taylor Nov 14 '13 at 20:10

1 Answer 1

It's unlikely that you can use mapcon in your solution, so I don't feel like the following code is giving you a homework answer. If you read up on what mapcon does, though, and understand how to implement it, you can use the following as a guide to a solution.

(defun pairs (list)
  (mapcon (lambda (tail)
            (mapcar (lambda (y)
                      (list (first tail) y))
                    (rest tail)))
          list))
CL-USER> (pairs '(1 2 3 4))
;=> ((1 2) (1 3) (1 4) (2 3) (2 4) (3 4))

The idea here is that if you'd want to recurse on the tails of your original list. That is, consider (1 2 3 4) and generate some pairs from that, then consider (2 3 4) and generate some pairs from that, then (3 4), and then (4) and generate (an empty set of) some pairs from that:

(1 2 3 4) → [1, (2 3 4)] ↦ ((1 2) (1 3) (1 4))
  (2 3 4) → [2,   (3 4)] ↦ ((2 3) (2 4))
    (3 4) → [3,     (4)] ↦ ((3 4))
      (4) → [4,      ()] ↦ ()

Then you just need to put ((1 2) (1 3) (1 4)), ((2 3) (2 4)), ((3 4)), and () together to get ((1 2) (1 3) (1 4) (2 3) (2 4) (3 4)).

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