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I'm currently trying to write some code which, given a list of coin values, will return all the possible combination of coins summing up to some value. Here's an example of how the program should run:

>>> find_changes(4,[1,2,3])
[[1, 1, 1, 1], [2, 1, 1], [1, 2, 1], [3, 1], [1, 1, 2], [2, 2], [1, 3]]

I was given the following code template to fill out:

def find_changes(n, coins):
    if n < 0:
        return []
    if n == 0:
         return [[]]
    all_changes = []

    for last_used_coin in coins:
        ### DELETE THE "pass" LINE AND WRITE YOUR CODE HERE
        pass

    return all_changes

I tried using the following code inside the for loop:

all_changes.append[last_used_coin]
find_changes(n-last_used_coin,coins)

It's currently not working. What am I doing wrong?

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closed as off-topic by martineau, oefe, Ahmed Siouani, Stony, beryllium Nov 15 '13 at 8:58

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7  
What is it supposed to do? What's going wrong? Homework requires more effort... –  sdasdadas Nov 14 '13 at 17:44
    
Yes I know , It is supposed to return a list of list of all possible combinations giving us the sum n , I am new to recursion on Python ,so ..... –  user2928714 Nov 14 '13 at 17:47
    
You should first figure out what your base case is, and then figure out how to break down the problem into smaller sub-problems. If this is hard (because this isn't the easiest recursion question), try to solve something like a Fibonacci recursion first. –  sdasdadas Nov 14 '13 at 17:51
    
@user2928714 -- Welcome to StackOverflow! The reason you were being downvoted was that on first glance, it looked like you were asking a question without stating what the problem was, or what you were trying to do. I tried fixing some of the problems in your post for you, but in the future, try asking your question more clearly, and learn how to format your posts on StackOverflow. –  Michael0x2a Nov 14 '13 at 17:52
    
Thank you Michael –  user2928714 Nov 14 '13 at 17:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your answer was close, but was failing due to a combination of syntax errors, and logic errors.

Remember, append is a method call -- you want add a set of parenthesis around your brackets, like so:

all_changes.append([last_used_coin])   
# Add a list of one element to the `all_changes` list

However, your code still doesn't quite work. Let's try picking through the code.

If we look at your for loop, it's looping through every possible coin in your list. You took the correct next step -- you found all the possible coin combinations for n - last_used_coin through your line find_changes(n - last_used_coin, coins).

Now, all you need to do is iterate through all the possible coin combos from calling find_changes, add back on last_used_coin, and append everything to the all_changes list.

Here's the final, working code:

def find_changes(n, coins):
    if n < 0:
        return []
    if n == 0:
         return [[]]
    all_changes = []

    for last_used_coin in coins:
        combos = find_changes(n - last_used_coin, coins)
        for combo in combos:
            combo.append(last_used_coin)
            all_changes.append(combo)

    return all_changes

print find_changes(4, [1,2,3])
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Thank you very very much Michael ,I highly appreciate it! –  user2928714 Nov 14 '13 at 18:08
    
It takes time to adapt the recursive thinking although i fully understand how to apply it on mathematical recursive defintions –  user2928714 Nov 14 '13 at 18:10
    
There is a problem ,the output is :[[[[[[1], 1], 1], [[2], 1], 1, 1], [[[[1], 1], 1], [[2], 1], 1, 1], [[[1], 2], 1], [[3], 1]], [[[[[1], 1], 1], [[2], 1], 1, 1], [[[[1], 1], 1], [[2], 1], 1, 1], [[[1], 2], 1], [[3], 1]], [[[[[1], 1], 1], [[2], 1], 1, 1], [[[[1], 1], 1], [[2], 1], 1, 1], [[[1], 2], 1], [[3], 1]], [[[[[1], 1], 1], [[2], 1], 1, 1], [[[[1], 1], 1], [[2], 1], 1, 1], [[[1], 2], 1], [[3], 1]], [[[[1], 1], 2], [[2], 2]], [[[[1], 1], 2], [[2], 2]], [[[1], 3]]] –  user2928714 Nov 14 '13 at 18:23
    
@user2928714 -- whoops! It should be fixed now (I was appending combos instead of combo to all_changes) –  Michael0x2a Nov 14 '13 at 18:27
    
Thank you again ,Is there a recommended book for learning recursion ,and recursive thinking (how it works generally .adapting the recursive thinking )-is there also a recommended book -both books should be general of course -not specifically on python...Thanks –  user2928714 Nov 14 '13 at 18:40

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