Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Im trying to make a struct that holds several points to structs because i got a program that reads an img file, and depending on wheter this file is 16, 24 or 32 bit i want to treat it as such. The problem occurs when i try to make my pixelpointer point to one of the other structs ("incompatible types when assigning to type 'Pixel' from type 'Pixel24'"). I realy dont know how to make this work, so i really need some help on it.

I also want to check for a specific file extension when i open the file and i only want to process it if it's the correct file extension, but i have no clue as how to do that.

typedef struct pixel16 {
    uint8_t R, G, B;
}__attribute__((packed)) Pixel16;

typedef struct pixel24 {
    uint8_t R, G, B;
}__attribute__((packed)) Pixel24;

typedef struct pixel32 {
    uint8_t R, G, B, A;
}__attribute__((packed)) Pixel32;


typedef struct pixel{
    Pixel16 pixel16;
    Pixel24 pixel24;
    Pixel32 pixel32;
}__attribute__((packed)) Pixel;

typedef struct file{
    Header *imageHeader;
    Pixel *imageData;
}File

void something(File file){
   Pixel *pixelptr;

    if(file->imageHeader.pixelDepth == 16)
        *pixelptr = file->imageData->pixel16;
    else if(file->imageHeader.pixelDepth == 24)
        *pixelptr = file->imageData->pixel24;
    else
        *pixelptr = file->imageData->pixel32;
}
share|improve this question
    
Updated my code a bit, had forgotten to add the struct File i use to collect the imagadata and header info in. – UserQuestion Nov 14 '13 at 19:11
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use a union:

typedef struct {
    int depth;
    union {
        Pixel16 p16;
        Pixel24 p24;
        Pixel32 p32;
    } data;
} Pixel;

if (pixel.depth == 16)
    pixel.data.p16 = ...;
else if (pixel.depth == 24)
    pixel.data.p24 = ...;
else if (pixel.depth == 32)
    pixel.data.p32 = ...;

A union lets you access any one of its field, while only taking up the storage for the largest member.

As for the extension part, you can use strrpbrk() to scan the string from the end until the first dot or directory separator.

ext = strrpbrk(path, "./");

if (!ext || *ext != '.')
    ; /* No extension found. */

if (!strcmp(ext, ".png")
    ...
else if (!strcmp(ext, ".bmp")
    ...
else
    ... /* Unknown extension. */
share|improve this answer
    
I might just be an idiot here (never used union before), but i get "request for member 'data' in something nor a structure or union" when i try this. (although i dont see why as it clearly is a union im trying to reach) – UserQuestion Nov 14 '13 at 19:11
    
@UserQuestion Sorry, my bad. The data (name of the field) should go at the end. I've corrected it in my example. – haste Nov 14 '13 at 19:17

I would use a mixture of unions and structs:

typedef struct pixel16 {
    uint8_t R, G, B;
}__attribute__((packed)) Pixel16;

typedef struct pixel24 {
     uint8_t R, G, B;
}__attribute__((packed)) Pixel24;

typedef struct pixel32 {
     uint8_t R, G, B, A;
}__attribute__((packed)) Pixel32;


typedef union pixel {
    Pixel16 pixel16;
    Pixel24 pixel24;
    Pixel32 pixel32;
} Pixel;

typedef struct file{
    Pixel *imageData;
}File

You would then use it with something like the following:

void something(File file){
Pixel *pixelptr;

    if(file->imageHeader.pixelDepth == 16)
        *pixelptr = file->imageData.pixel16;
    else if(file->imageHeader.pixelDepth == 24)
        *pixelptr = file->imageData.pixel24;
    else
        *pixelptr = file->imageData.pixel32;
}
share|improve this answer
    
To make it work (somewhat) i have to call: *pixelptr = file->imageData->pixel16; (a . isnt working after imageData), but then i get a new error: "incompatible types when assigning to type Pixel from Type Pixel16" (im probably just being an idiot, but i cant make it work) – UserQuestion Nov 14 '13 at 19:28
    
@UserQuestion You are trying to store Pixel16 in a Pixel. The union lets you share the same storage with all the types, but when working with the data, you still need to access it with the correct type (which would be Pixel16). In my answer, the depth field denotes which union member you should be accessing once you have determined the pixel depth of the file. – haste Nov 14 '13 at 19:38
    
Ah, of course. But does that not mean that i can not use a single pixelptr to do all the work later? I have to switch after what pixelptr that is used on everything i will do later? – UserQuestion Nov 14 '13 at 19:42
    
@UserQuestion The pixel depth is probably stored in the imageHeader so rather than storing the pixel depth in each Pixel structure, you could just use the depth in the header to know which union member to access. – haste Nov 14 '13 at 19:45
    
Scratch that last one, i understood it now. Thanks a lot for the patience :) – UserQuestion Nov 14 '13 at 19:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.