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Seems like it should be an easy procedure, but I haven't been able to find the answer after some searching through the help databases for ?lm, ?glm, ?loglin, etc.

Given the dataset

    Y   X
1   4.040000    0.8247096
2   3.170000    0.7896353
3   4.570000    0.8480331
4   1.460000    0.7236442
5   2.920000    0.8056733
6   4.640000    0.8468943
7   4.400000    0.6950719
8   3.570000    0.6297521
9   4.560000    0.6944195
10  1.760000    0.5485687
11  2.580000    0.6166014
12  4.470000    0.6948886
13  0.600000    0.2951873
14  0.360000    0.3001486
15  2.910000    0.7775315
16  0.580000    0.5239421
17  2.690000    0.7735998
18  2.080000    0.7224670
19  0.450000    0.3042284
20  3.050000    0.8391136
...

I would like to fit several models of specific forms to this data, for example:

Y = a*(b^X)+c
Y = a*(X^b)+c

Is there a simple way to solve for the best fit coefficients a, b, and c given a user-defined functional form? And, while I'm at it, return a R2 or some other metric to determine which is the best fit?

Thanks!

-sam

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1  
I think you are looking for nls which is non-linear least squares models; that is you specify functional form to fit to. –  Brian Diggs Nov 14 '13 at 19:30
    
although note that R^2 is dicey at best for non-linear least squares fit -- although it might be OK for comparing models with equal numbers of parameters. –  Ben Bolker Nov 14 '13 at 19:50
    
Great- thanks for the tips. I will try nls, and maybe another metric of fit (e.g. RMSE). –  Sam Zipper Nov 14 '13 at 20:01

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