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i am not really sure how to ask this question properly. so apologies in advance.

but it's basically around how to make an existing app, with a UI, run as a scheduled task with no UI.

background..

I have a winforms app written in vs2012 with 2 forms.

the first form is the login, straight forward, but currently expects user interaction of their username and password.

the second is the main form. which does the main work when you hit the "start" button.

what I am trying to achieve it is for me to send it some command line parameters that would run it without any ui as a scheduled task.

so, I'm guessing, I need get rid of needing the user to input login details. and somehow trigger the "start download" button and make it invisible.

I've worked out how to send command line parameters and can see how to get the software to do something different if it hears /silent but how do I hide the forms?

I'm lost.

any help would be much appreciated!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Modify the Main method which should be the entry point to your application. If there are any arguments, you don't need to instantiate and show any forms, just run the code to do your job without UI.

    [STAThread]
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        if (args.Length > 0)
        {
            // silent mode - you don't need to instantiate any forms
        }
        else
        {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            Application.Run(new Form1());
        }
    }
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1  
i did this. because it matched perfectly what was in the file. many many thanks to everyone!! –  Trevor Daniel Nov 14 '13 at 21:33

C# still has a Main() function. In a standard winforms solution, all it does is create your Form1 (or whatever it gets renamed to), and start the application event queue with that form.

For example, it should look something like:

public static void Main()
{
     Application.Run(new Form1());
}

Modify this function. If you see command line arguments, do whatever you have to. If there are none, let it do its normal magic with the form. When you're done, it would be something like:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    if (args.Length > 0) {
        // log in
        // do all the necessary stuff
    } else {
        Application.Run(new Form1());
    }
}
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I think this is a lot cleaner of a solution, as if you're running from a console, you'll be passing in parameters (i.e. username, password) to it anyways. –  user2366842 Nov 14 '13 at 20:22

find static Main method in your solution. Inside that method you will have Application.Run(new Form()) or (form.Show() or ShowDialog()). So they key is to pass a parameter that will tell you now to call this method (Show method on forms)

The key is to have your business logic in a class that is independent of you form and use this class when you want to have GUI or when you want scheduled task

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1  
+1 for mentioning that the underlying business logic should be the same either way. That's important for robust programming. –  Scott Mermelstein Nov 14 '13 at 20:23

I answered this just other day -- on this question

Pay attention to the difference between code blocks -- the first block runs formless, the 2nd block is standard.

  if (ABCFile > 0)
  {
    var me = new MainForm(); // instantiate the form
    me.NoGui(ABCFile); // call the alternate entry point
    Environment.Exit(0);
  }
  else
  {
    Application.EnableVisualStyles();
    Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
    Application.Run(new MainForm());
  }
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and now you use your Form to do work not related to form (or UI).. It's a far from perfect design –  evhen14 Nov 14 '13 at 20:20
    
It is an occasional convenient hack -- Of course, you can replace me.NoGui() with something not embedded in a form -- works the same way in terms of allowing a "forms app" to run formless based on certain command line args. I illustrate this way so that OP can see how to access logic based in the form -- as is often the case when someone adds this logic after the fact. –  Gary Walker Nov 14 '13 at 20:23

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