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I have the following method in one of my classes. It's just a public wrapper around a HashMap (named teamOfPlayer, with keys of Player objects and values of Integer objects), nothing more.

public int getTeamOfPlayer(Player p)
{    
    return teamOfPlayer.get(p);
}

As long as my Player objects inherited the default hashCode() method from Object, this worked just fine. However, in order to save my Player objects to files, I implemented my own hashCode(). Suddenly, the method began throwing a NullPointerException.

I expanded the method as follows to print out some debugging information, but it's left me even more confused than before.

public int getTeamOfPlayer(Player p)
{
    Object[] o = teamOfPlayer.keySet().toArray();
    Player p2 = (Player) o[0];

    System.out.println("getTeamOfPlayer(" + p + ")"
        + "\n\thash of argument is " + p.hashCode()
        + "\n\tkeySet() of hashmap is " + teamOfPlayer.keySet() 
        + "\n\tcontainsKey() of hashmap is " + teamOfPlayer.containsKey(p) 
        + "\n\tplayer extracted from keySet() is " + p2 
        + "\n\tplayer extracted from keySet() has hash of" + p2.hashCode() 
        + "\n\targument.equals(key) returns " + p.equals(p2) 
        + "\n\tkey.equals(argument) returns " + p2.equals(p));

    int i = teamOfPlayer.get(p);
    return i;
}

The output of the above method is here:

getTeamOfPlayer(main.data.entities.Player@89f632df)
    hash of argument is -1980353825
    keySet() of hashmap is [main.data.entities.Player@89f632df]
    containsKey() of hashmap is false
    player extracted from keySet() is main.data.entities.Player@89f632df
    player extracted from keySet() has hash of-1980353825
    argument.equals(key) returns true
    key.equals(argument) returns true

The exception is thrown on the "int i = teamOfPlayer.get(p);" line, meaning that the map is returning null (because it doesn't think it contains the key). I know that's why the exception is being thrown. However, I think I've proven that the key DOES exist in the map. What's going on?

--

Update: Here are the equals() and hashCode() methods.

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj)
{
    if (this == obj)
        return true;

    Player player;

    if (obj != null && obj instanceof Player)
        player = (Player) obj;
    else
        return false;

    if (status != player.status || !name.equals(player.name) || race != player.race || weeksOut != player.weeksOut || injuryType != player.injuryType
        || XP != player.XP)
        return false;

    for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
    {
        if (attributes[i] != player.attributes[i])
            return false;

        if (injuries[i] != player.injuries[i])
            return false;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 28; i++)
    {
        if (hasSkill[i] != player.hasSkill[i])
            return false;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        if (equipment[i] != player.equipment[i])
            return false;
    }

    return true;
}

@Override
public int hashCode()
{
    int hash = 11;

    hash = 31 * hash + status;
    hash = 31 * hash + name.hashCode();
    hash = 31 * hash + race;
    hash = 31 * hash + weeksOut;
    hash = 31 * hash + injuryType;
    hash = 31 * hash + XP;

    for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
    {
        hash = 31 * hash + attributes[i];
        hash = 31 * hash + injuries[i];
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 28; i++)
        hash = hash + (hasSkill[i] ? 1 : 0);

    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        hash = 31 * hash + equipment[i];

    return hash;
}
share|improve this question
5  
Did you override equals to be consistent with hashCode? – rgettman Nov 14 '13 at 20:19
1  
please post the code for your hashCode() and equals() method – NickJ Nov 14 '13 at 20:35
1  
@rgettman You can see from the debugging output that not only do both objects have identical hash codes, but they also equal each other. – Gamer_2k4 Nov 14 '13 at 21:13
    
Your hashCode() method has some problems that may bite you down the road. For example hasSkill seems to be an array of 28 booleans. As coded, any two players with the same number of hasSkill elements true will have the same hashCode - even if none of the skills of one player match any of the others. For example, player A could have "good fastball" and "good curve ball" and player B could have "power hitter" and "great outfield speed" and both would have same hash code. But this is not the cause of your problem. Get something like Eclipse. It will generate a hashCode for you. Study it. – Steve Cohen Nov 14 '13 at 21:20
    
@SteveCohen Thanks for both tips. I never knew Eclipse could do that, and you're definitely right about the boolean array. Much appreciated. – Gamer_2k4 Nov 14 '13 at 22:08

Both these answers are right. More specifically

teamOfPlayer.get(p) is returning null (maybe because equals() and hashcode() are not in synch) and then getTeamOfPlayer() is trying to convert null into an int.

If that method returned Integer instead of int, you wouldn't have this problem, or if you coded it as

public int getTeamOfPlayer(Player p)
{    
    Integer t = teamOfPlayer.get(p);
    if (t == null) {
        return -1;
    } 
    return t;
}

you'd be okay. Probably you need to do both. By all means, fix hashCode(), but also, you probably need to consider the legitimate case of a player who is not on any team.

share|improve this answer

What's happening is you are auto-unboxing a null.

The Map's value type is Integer, not int, and the get method is returning a null either because the key is not found or because the Map entry actually has a null for its value.

The line of code that's exploding:

int i = teamOfPlayer.get(p);

is actually compiled to:

int i = teamOfPlayer.get(p).intValue();

to convert from the wrapper Integer, which may be null, to the primitive int, which may not be null.

You must deal with the null, eg try giving a default value to i in case of null:

Integer value = teamOfPlayer.get(p);
int i = value == null ? 0 : value;
share|improve this answer
    
nice concise explanation – Steve Cohen Nov 14 '13 at 21:25

see equals() and hashCode() contract in Java

The problem with your test is that it proves only that there is one pair of players for which the hashcode() and equals() return true. You haven't proven that for all possible pairs(a,b) of players in the map, if a.equals(b) then a.hashCode() == b.hashCode(). You could probably write such a test and find where the disconnect lies.

The reason this is important is because it also affects the process of adding entries to the map. That is why your hashCode() method forced the problem to appear. If you get the source code for java.lang.Object, you'll see in comments that the default hashCode implementation most likely uses the ADDRESS of the object in calculating hashCode. This goes along with the default equals() method which is defined as a == b.

Still, it's not easy to see a place where you are violating this contract, that is where a.equals(b) but a.hashCode() != b.hashCode().

One possible place, and I can't say for sure because I don't know the types of all your variables are:

if (status != player.status || !name.equals(player.name) || race != player.race || weeksOut != player.weeksOut || injuryType != player.injuryType
    || XP != player.XP)
    return false;

If any of these are boolean, this might not give you the results you are expecting. You might need to put parentheses around each individual condition, or better yet, make each one a separate condition and return false at each inequality.

In other words, the problem is most likely a false positive on equals().

share|improve this answer

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