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I'm trying to calculate the slope of two data lists. You can easily calculate this in EXCEL using the SLOPE function. =SLOPE(A1:A100, B1:B100). I'm trying to mimic this function in C# WinForm. Here is my code, it can calculate something, but not the correct number that you would get from the Excel function. Please help me find the error here. Thanks so much!

private double Getslope(List<double> ProductGrossExcessReturnOverRFR, List<double> primaryIndexExcessReturnOverRFR, int months, int go_back = 0)
{
    double slope = 0;
    double sumx = 0, sumy = 0, sumxy = 0, sumx2 = 0;
    for (int i = ProductGrossExcessReturnOverRFR.Count - 1 - go_back; i > ProductGrossExcessReturnOverRFR.Count - (1 + months + go_back); i--)
    {
        sumxy += ProductGrossExcessReturnOverRFR[i] * primaryIndexExcessReturnOverRFR[i];
        sumx += ProductGrossExcessReturnOverRFR[i];
        sumy += primaryIndexExcessReturnOverRFR[i];
        sumx2 += ProductGrossExcessReturnOverRFR[i] * ProductGrossExcessReturnOverRFR[i];      
    }

    return slope = 1 / (((sumxy - sumx * sumy / months) / (sumx2 - sumx * sumx / months)));
}

Test data:
{1.085231224, 2.335034309, 0.346667278} and
{3.185231224,3.705034309 , -0.883332722} should have slope of 0.3373 if you calculate in Excel using =SLOPE function. But my code produces 0.47 somehow...

share|improve this question
    
Some input data and the expected result would be helpful –  dazedandconfused Nov 14 '13 at 20:25
    
{1.085231224, 2.335034309, 0.346667278} and {3.185231224,3.705034309 , -0.883332722} should have slope of 0.3373 if you calculate in Excel using =SLOPE function. But my code produces 0.47 somehow... –  Eddie Nov 14 '13 at 20:34
    
You are very unclear about the input conditions (what does {1.085231224, 2.335034309, 0.346667278} and {3.185231224,3.705034309 , -0.883332722} mean at all?); about your formula (what does months mean?); and you are not even providing a way to validate the calculations (something which might be easily input in Excel). Can you please improve all this? –  varocarbas Nov 14 '13 at 20:44
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think your formula is wrong

According to the Excel documentation the formula for SLOPE is

Note also that the first argument to the function is the the y values.

It's unclear how goback and months apply, but it looks like this might work:

private double Getslope(List<double> ProductGrossExcessReturnOverRFR, 
                        List<double> primaryIndexExcessReturnOverRFR, 
                        int months, 
                        int go_back = 0)
{
    // calc # of items to skip
    int skip = ProductGrossExcessReturnOverRFR.Count - go_back - months;

    // get list of x's and y's
    var ys = ProductGrossExcessReturnOverRFR.Skip(skip).Take(months);
    var xs = primaryIndexExcessReturnOverRFR.Skip(skip).Take(months);

    // "zip" xs and ys to make the sum of products easier
    var xys = Enumerable.Zip(xs,ys, (x, y) => new {x = x, y = y});

    double xbar = xs.Average();
    double ybar = ys.Average();

    double slope = xys.Sum(xy => (xy.x - xbar) * (xy.y - ybar)) / xs.Sum(x => (x - xbar)*(x - xbar));

    return slope;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@D Stanley, your code get 2.11 which is 1/0.47. So essentially it's the same as mine. int months in my code is the number of data within each list. int go_back in most cases would be 0 by definition, but I use it to deal with Year-To-Date situation in other functions. Shouldn't be a problem here. –  Eddie Nov 14 '13 at 21:01
    
@Eddie can you please provide a way to validate your calculations as suggested via comments? For example 3/4 cases. Perhaps it is a rounding problem as far as lots of operations are involved. –  varocarbas Nov 14 '13 at 21:03
    
I think @D Stanley just edited his code above and it works now. @ D Stanley would you please tell me what did you change since the first post? Thank you! –  Eddie Nov 14 '13 at 21:06
1  
@Eddie you don't need to write @ when you are in the answer of the given user. Also you can take a look at the "Edited X mins ago" link above. But, please, in the future provide much better information as far as what D Stanley did was basically a lucky guess (there wasn't enough information in your question to even know what you wanted for sure). PS: also it would be a good thing if you answer people talking to you. –  varocarbas Nov 14 '13 at 21:09
    
@varocarbas I switched the xs and ys. SLOPE takes the ys as the first argument - I was assuming you were using the first argument for the xs. –  D Stanley Nov 14 '13 at 22:12
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