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I use python in GAP and try to delete one entries in datastore by using db.delete(model_obj). I suppose this operation is undertaken synchronously, since the document tell the difference between delete() and delete_async(), but when I read the source code in the db, the delete method just simply call the delete_async, which is not match what the document says :(

So is there any one to do delete in synchronous flow? Here is the source code in db:

def delete_async(models, **kwargs):
  """Asynchronous version of delete one or more Model instances.

  Identical to db.delete() except returns an asynchronous object. Call
  get_result() on the return value to block on the call.
  """

  if isinstance(models, (basestring, Model, Key)):
    models = [models]
  else:
    try:
      models = iter(models)
    except TypeError:
      models = [models]
  keys = [_coerce_to_key(v) for v in models]

  return datastore.DeleteAsync(keys, **kwargs)


def delete(models, **kwargs):
  """Delete one or more Model instances.
  """
  delete_async(models, **kwargs).get_result()

EDIT: From a comment, this is the original misbehaving code:

def tearDown(self): 
    print self.account 
    db.delete(self.device) 
    db.delete(self.account) 
    print Account.get_by_email(self.email, case_sensitive=False) 

The result for two print statement is <Account object at 0x10d1827d0> <Account object at 0x10d1825d0>. Even two memory addresses are different but they point to the same object. If I put some latency after the delete like for loop, the object fetched is None.

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1 Answer 1

The code you show for delete calls delete_async, yes, but then it calls get_result on the returned asynchronous handle, which will block until the delete actually occurs. So, delete is synchronous.

The reason the sample code you show is returning an object is that you're probably running a query to fetch the account; I presume the email is not the db.Key of the account? Normal queries are not guaranteed to return updated results immediately. To avoid seeing stale data, you either need to use an ancestor query or look up the entity by key, both of which are strongly consistent.

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Hmm, sounds reasonable. But when I db.delete(object_a) and just right after that db.delete(object_b) and try to fetch object b it is still there.object b is object a's parent. I do not know why does it happens –  Mike Nov 15 '13 at 0:37
    
@Mike, can you edit your question to include the code which you're describing which deletes the objects and then fetches them, along with the results you're seeing and the results you expect? –  Jesse Rusak Nov 15 '13 at 14:02
    
I suspect you're having an issue with app engine's eventual consistency but if you post the code you're using, we might be able to confirm that and suggest a fix. –  Jesse Rusak Nov 15 '13 at 14:03
    
def tearDown(self): print self.account db.delete(self.device) db.delete(self.account) print Account.get_by_email(self.email, case_sensitive=False) the result for two print statement is :<Account object at 0x10d1827d0> <Account object at 0x10d1825d0>. Even two memory addresss are different but they point to the same object. If I put some latency after the delete like for loop, the object fetched is None. –  Mike Nov 15 '13 at 18:20
    
@Mike: I've added your code to your original question and updated my answer to match. –  Jesse Rusak Nov 16 '13 at 16:41

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