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I have been struggling with trees and python in the last couple of days. Mostly, it's the recursion in trees that is giving me trouble. The problem that I am trying to solve is to find first common ancestor in a binary tree. There are plenty of solutions around that claim to have done that, but they are all for binary search trees, not binary trees. In the case of binary trees, nodes are not ordered so that left is smaller than right. I know which approach I should use, but I am failing in the recursion part: (EDIT: the problem states that I can't use additional data structures or storage)

class Node:

    """docstring for Node"""
    def __init__(self, data):
        self.data = data
        self.left=None
        self.right=None

def findNode(self,target):
    if self==None:
        return 0
    if self.data==target:
        return 1
    return self.findNode(self.left,target) or self.findNode(self.right,target)

def firstCommonAncestor(self,p,q):
    if self==None:
        return 0
    if self.left.data==p and self.right.data==q:
        return self.data
    if findNode(self.left,p) and findNode(self.right,q):
       return 1

root=Node(2)
root.left=Node(5)
root.right=Node(4)
root.left.left=Node(9)
root.left.right=Node(7)
print firstCommonAncestor(root,9,7)

I edited the code to make the problem more clear. findNode(self.left,p) and findNode(self.right,q) should return 1 since both nodes exist. However, when findNode(self.right,q) is not starting the search from the root. I know I should implement recursive calls, but everything I have tried has failed. If someone could provide some pointers on what I am doing wrong, it would be greatly appreciated! (the firstCommonAncestor is not yet implemented, so that doesn't really matter. It's not doing much for now). Edit: this is a problem from Cracking the coding interview.

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5 Answers 5

(Just to give you a hint on why its not working)

When you search for y, its not going back to the root. Your code is doing the right thing. The reason why you can't find Node(7) is because of your data.

This is your tree.

         2
         |
      -------
     5       4
  -------
  9     7 

Your x search is findNode(Node(5), 9) which finds 9.

While your y search is findNode(Node(4), 7) which of course would never find 7

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer

Another hint: your instance methods fell out of the class, and are just ordinary global methods (it's not just the issue of indentation because you also call them in a wrong way). Here is a proper definition of findNode:

class Node:

    """docstring for Node"""
    def __init__(self, data):
        self.data = data
        self.left=None
        self.right=None

    def findNode(self,target):
        result = None

        if self.data == target:
            return self

        result = self.left.findNode(target) if self.left else None
        if not result:
            result = self.right.findNode(target) if self.right else None

        return result

    def firstCommonAncestor(self, p, q):
        pass #TODO

In the findNode method you also have an example of how to call it. You should also fix this in firstCommonAncestor method.

share|improve this answer
class Node:
    def __init__(self, data):
        self.data = data
        self.left = None
        self.right = None

    def isAncestor(self, p, q):
        ret = 0
        if self.data == None:
            return ret
        if (self.data == p):
            ret += 1
        if self.data == q:
            ret += 1
        if ret == 2:
            return ret
        if self.left!=None:
            ret += self.left.isAncestor(p, q)
        if ret == 2:
            return ret
        if self.right!=None:
            return ret + self.right.isAncestor(p ,q)
        return ret

    def commonAncestor(self, p, q):
        if q == p and (self.left.data == q or self.right.data == q):
            return self
        lNodes = self.left.isAncestor(p, q)
        if lNodes == 2:
            if self.left.data == p or self.left.data == q:
                return self.left
            else:
                return self.left.commonAncestor(p, q)
        elif lNodes == 1:
            if self.data == p:
                return p
            elif self.data == q:
                return q

        rNodes = self.right.isAncestor(p, q)
        if rNodes == 2:
            if self.right.data == p or self.right.data == q:
                return self.right
            else:
                return self.right.commonAncestor(p, q)
        elif rNodes == 1:
            if self.data == p:
                return p
            elif self.data == q:
                return q

        if lNodes == 1 and rNodes ==1:
            return self
        else:
            return None


"""
             2
           /   \
          5     4
        /  \   /  \
       9    7     11
                    \
                    12
"""
if __name__ == '__main__':
    root=Node(2)
    root.left=Node(2)
    root.right=Node(4)
    root.right.right=Node(11)
    root.left.left=Node(9)
    root.left.right=Node(7)
    root.right.right.right=Node(12)
    common = root.commonAncestor(2,2)
    if common != None:
        print common.data
    else:
        print "Not found"
share|improve this answer

since the tree isn't ordered, you are going to have to search a lot of it anyway. and since you aren't allowed extra data structures you are in danger of repeating a lot of searches.

so it's probably most efficient to recurse down to the leaf nodes once, and then on the return combine data. this is O(n), but then so is a single search.

so that's what the code below tries to do. the search method returns (a's parent, b's parent) and if they are different, but both set, then we are at the common ancestor.

def search(self, a, b):
    ap1 = ap2 = ap3 = bp1 = bp2 = bp3 = None
    # parents to left
    if self.left:
        ap1, bp1 = self.left.search(a, b)
    # parents to right
    if self.right:
        ap2, bp2 = self.right.search(a, b)
    # are we an immediate "parent" ourselves?
    if self.data == a: 
        ap3 = self
    elif self.data == b:
        bp3 = self
    # only one of the above can succeed, so find it
    ap = ap1 or ap2 or ap3
    bp = bp1 or bp2 or bp3
    # if we are the point where two paths meet at the common
    # ancestor, return ourselves
    if ap and bp and ap != bp:
        return self, self
    # otherwise, return what we have
    else:
        return ap, bp
share|improve this answer
    
it's not readable –  evhen14 Nov 15 '13 at 0:03

EDIT : Reworked solution to make it cleaner and resolve issues from comments

There is quite efficient solution, but a bit more complicated. It involves drilling into the tree and tracking if you have found first or second value when you go back up. If at some point you have found both (1st and 2nd) return that node and it will be your common ancestor.

Here is more efficient solution, but it does not work if you have DUPLICATES, but it helps you to get the idea and solve it for duplicate cases:

class Node:
    """docstring for Node"""
    def __init__(self, data):
        self.data = data
        self.left=None
        self.right=None

    def union(self, u1, u2):
        res = u1[0] or u2[0], u1[1] or u2[1], u1[2] or u2[2]
        if res[0] and res[1] and not res[2]:
            return res[0], res[1], self
        return res

    def doCommon(self, p, q):
        # recursion base case
        l = (False, False, None)
        r = (False, False, None)
        if self.left:
            l = self.left.doCommon(p, q)
        if self.right:
            r = self.right.doCommon(p, q)

        res = self.union(l, r)
        if res[0] and res[1]:
            return res

        if self.data == p:
            return self.union((True, False, None), res)
        if self.data == q:
            return self.union((False, True, None), res)
        return res

    def common(self, p, q):
        return self.doCommon(p, q)[2]



if __name__ == '__main__':
    root=Node(2)
    root.left=Node(5)
    root.right=Node(4)
    root.left.left=Node(9)
    root.left.right=Node(7)
    res = root.common(9,7)
    if res != None:
        print res.data
    else:
        print "Not found"
share|improve this answer
    
I understand that. The problem specifically says to avoid additional data structures or creating additional storage. I edited the original question to clarify this. –  Anastasia Nov 14 '13 at 23:23
    
yes, graph is a more generic data structure that requires more generic algorithm. –  evhen14 Nov 14 '13 at 23:31
1  
Thank you, I see where my mistake was! –  Anastasia Nov 15 '13 at 0:03
    
be careful, it's not the most efficient solution. More affecting would be to have a flag to say if both values are there, otherwise you have to check it in each recursive call. –  evhen14 Nov 15 '13 at 0:05
    
I know it is inefficient. My problem was the error inside the code: I placed the function outside node class and therefore, many things went wrong. –  Anastasia Nov 15 '13 at 0:13

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