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what is wrong with this code it compiles without error's but when i run it i get a bus error

#include <wchar.h>
#include <stdio.h>


int main(void)
{
char *a =  "yes";
char *b = "no";
char *c = "";

        puts ("\ntype yes or no for selection\n");
        puts ("do you like icecream\n");
        scanf("%c", &*c);

                if (*c == *a){
                puts("you win $1000000000");
                }

                if (*c == *b){
                puts("you loose $50");
                }
return 0;
}
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closed as off-topic by Mitch Wheat, Ed Heal, Jeyaram, Yu Hao, Viruss mca Nov 15 '13 at 6:27

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Mitch Wheat, Ed Heal, Jeyaram, Yu Hao, Viruss mca
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Hint: char *c = ""; followed by scanf("%c", &*c); This is very basic stuff. –  Mitch Wheat Nov 15 '13 at 3:50
    
1) To input strings "yes" or "no" use %s format specifier. 2) To compare strings use strcmp library function, you cannot compare just by ==. 3) Allocate some memory to c pointer. –  Don't You Worry Child Nov 15 '13 at 3:54
    
@0xF1: He could use %c if c pointed to modifiable memory. He can compare the first characters of the strings as shown, but he should cover the case where the input is neither y nor n. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 15 '13 at 3:56
    
@JonathanLeffler: Right, he can also do it that way. –  Don't You Worry Child Nov 15 '13 at 4:00
    
Please compile with all warnings and debug info (i.e. gcc -Wall -g prog.c -o myprog) and learn how to use the debugger (with gdb myprog) –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 15 '13 at 6:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are some hints to get you started:

  1. Store user's answer as a string, rather than pointer to a char variable. So instead of using char *c, you can use char c[4].
  2. When getting user's answer, use scanf("%s", c);, because user's input will be yes or no, which is a string, rather than a character.
  3. When comparing user's answer with the defined answer, use strcmp method, because you are comparing string, and not just a character.
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5  
4. Learn how to spell "lose" :-) But don't ever do #2 in production code (education, assignments or quick'n'dirty applications are probably okay) - it opens you up to buffer overflow attacks. –  paxdiablo Nov 15 '13 at 3:55
    
@paxdiablo. You mean it's better to use fgets as we can specify the max length? –  rcs Nov 15 '13 at 4:01
3  
rcs, yes, a favorite of mine: stackoverflow.com/questions/4023895/… –  paxdiablo Nov 15 '13 at 4:02
char *c =  "";

Declares c a pointer to a zero-length string in unwritable memory. So scanf() has no bytes to write to, and couldn't if it did.

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You need to allocate memory for the pointer c. You are trying to scan a string. But where the string will be stored? change the following

char *c = "";

to

char c[MAX]; //you #define MAX to maximum length of the string.

While scanning for the string, use

scanf("%s",c); 

To know where the variables are allocated memory (for reference), http://stackoverflow.com/a/18479996/1814023

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i tried this but it says MAX is undeclared –  That_Linux_Guy Nov 15 '13 at 4:04
    
include this #define MAX 10 –  user1814023 Nov 15 '13 at 4:08
    
sorry it worked by putting a number in –  That_Linux_Guy Nov 15 '13 at 5:00

scanf("%c", &*c);

This line attempts to store the user's input into const char *. Once you declare something like:

char *foo = "bar";

You cannot change it.

If you intend on changing the string you must allocate memory, either automatically or dynamically with malloc().

char foo[10] = "bar"; or simply char foo[10]

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char *a =  "yes";

char *b = "no"; char *c = "";

Address pointed by c is at static memory area, and notes that the length of "" is just one char. So, you can malloc for c before using it!

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char *a="yes";

+----------+
|    y     |     4000
+----------+ 
|    e     |     4001
+----------+
|    s     |     4002
+----------+
|    \0    |     4003
+----------+

Suppose your address starts at 4000, then this is how the charcaters will be stored in memory and 4000 will be assigned to a. The same applies for other two definitions. SO you store a empty character in c. Also a,b,c are all read only memory and you cannot modify or store data into it at runtime.

You get string input but you compare only characters. Instead you can get a character input. Be simple.

int main(void)
{
    char *a="yes";
    char *b="no";
    char *c=malloc(sizeof(char));
    puts ("\ntype yes(y) or no(n) for selection\n");
    puts ("do you like icecream\n");
    scanf("%c",c);
    if (*c == *a)  puts("you win $1000000000");
    if (*c == *b)  puts("you lose $50");
  return 0;
}


int main(void)
{
    char c;
    puts ("\ntype yes(y) or no(n) for selection\n");
    puts ("do you like icecream\n");
    scanf("%c",&c);
    if (c == 'y')  puts("you win $1000000000");
    if (c == 'n')  puts("you lose $50");
return 0;
}
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If you define variable as a character (char), it can only hold a single byte (8 bits). Else you need to declare the variable as a string (%s). If you need to use characters, you can let the user enter character "y" for "yes" and character "n" for "no".

char *a =  "yes"; /*Wrong*/
char *b = "no";   /*Wrong*/

You have used pointers unnecessarily. Even without the pointers your goal can be achieved easily.

char *c = "";  /* Wrong */

You dont have to assign anything to "c" since you are using scanf() operator. So

char c;  /*would be fine*/

when the user enters one of "y" or "n", the character will get copied to the address of "c".

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